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Amare

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Parklawn and lakeshore will become one of the most densily populated areas in GTA, outside of the core of Toronto. Its logical progression for the OL to extend itself out to Parklawn. Humber Bay is is already plagued with poor transit as is, with excess of over 40 towers already and another 18 in the plans....this area needs it. Very short sighted by the province to not consider it.
Just a slight correction, Humber Bay will become the densest neighborhood in Canada once the Mondelez lands are developed. Even denser than St.James Town. At the moment I believe it's #2 in Canada.

We're not going to see the Ontario Line extended westwards for decades so dont put to much of your breath into deciding where it should go.
 

nfitz

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There’s a planned OL extension to Pearson? As in, announced and funded? When did this happen?
As in planned. In the province's latest Transportation Plan ... the third update now to the Big Move.

We discussed this extensively back in March in one of the Ontario Line extension threads.

Also was in the media. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/can...ation-plan-including-a-proposed-transit-line/

The project is a 50-km Ontario Line extension (project 30) from Science Centre station north to 407, along the 407 transitway alignment, west to 427, south to Pearson and then Kipling subway station.

Oddly there was no extension west of Exhibition station. There were also potential spurs to Burlington in the west, and Oshawa in the east (project 29) - though it's not clear what the technology would be - very similar to the north branch of the 1970s ALRT plan.
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SaugeenJunction

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As someone who wouldn’t vote PC for many reasons, Doug has improved transit plans in Ontario, hands down. The Ontario Line is better than the Relief Line in every way. One element that people forget about the RL is the massive (and costly) underground train interchange structure that was required at Pape to move trains onto Line 2 for yard access. The OL made that redundant.

Also, just a reminder that the Liberals deserve full credit for the Finch West LRT. The project reached financial close the day before the writ dropped for the 2018 election. Its heavily rumoured that Doug Ford wanted to cancel it, but the Liberals poison-pilled the heck out of the cancellation clause in the contract.
 

mdriver

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Just a slight correction, Humber Bay will become the densest neighborhood in Canada once the Mondelez lands are developed. Even denser than St.James Town. At the moment I believe it's #2 in Canada.

We're not going to see the Ontario Line extended westwards for decades so dont put to much of your breath into deciding where it should go.


Thats the saddest part, they could easily use the existing rail linesGo corridor from the CNE/and extended into Humber Bay site.
 

afransen

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Thats the saddest part, they could easily use the existing rail linesGo corridor from the CNE/and extended into Humber Bay site.
Why not just increase frequency on Lakeshore West? It is bananas to build a parallel subway line for silly reasons like lack of fare integration, etc.
 

turbanplanner

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Just a slight correction, Humber Bay will become the densest neighborhood in Canada once the Mondelez lands are developed. Even denser than St.James Town. At the moment I believe it's #2 in Canada.

We're not going to see the Ontario Line extended westwards for decades so dont put to much of your breath into deciding where it should go.
Humber bay has probably done more to discourage density than any group of nimbys could!

I'm regularly in the area and the it's crazy how mismanaged the area is more than a decade after redevelopment started! The streetcar has been closed nearly every year due to track work, the go station was finally confirmed recently after years of push back by planners and the province, the parking at the shops is out of control, and there is no green space that's mostly for the residents. (Yes there is a park in walking distance but it seems based on how full parking is the vast majority is people from further away which leads to a park that's way more crowded than other suburban parks.

There is a single bus that runs in the area to the subway and no express routes. Residents are warned by the TDSB schools nearby are basically full.
 

sunnyside

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Why not just increase frequency on Lakeshore West? It is bananas to build a parallel subway line for silly reasons like lack of fare integration, etc.
The benefit of extending the OL here is moreso for wherever it is connecting to, presumably the section from Kipling to the airport. Using the rail corridor is better than a new tunnel. Who knows, it could even replace part of the WWLRT.
 

W. K. Lis

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Why not just increase frequency on Lakeshore West? It is bananas to build a parallel subway line for silly reasons like lack of fare integration, etc.
They are going to increase the frequency along the entire Lakeshore West AND East.

See link.

GOExpansionFBC_v6_0_November2018_750.jpg


Have you been to the US in the past decade? Their subways/metro/rapid transit considers 20 minutes as "frequent".
 

allengeorge

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I’ll point out that the province has done various iterations of this “Big Move” transportation planning documents over the past 30+ years or more. These documents are visioning exercises. Yes, various politicians can reach into it and cherry-pick a plan or two as a starting point, but it’s a huge stretch to go from that document to a statement like ‘the province has planned this’.
 

nfitz

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I’ll point out that the province has done various iterations of this “Big Move” transportation planning documents over the past 30+ years or more. These documents are visioning exercises. Yes, various politicians can reach into it and cherry-pick a plan or two as a starting point, but it’s a huge stretch to go from that document to a statement like ‘the province has planned this’.
It's a huge stretch to go from "they planned this" to "they are building this.

But it's in the plan - and if you already knew about the plan, and simply were being disingenuous, please stop.

Of course much in the plan won't happen. At the same time, it makes it clear what the long-term thoughts are.

Not that there's much changed in the Don Mills/Leslie alignment since Transit City, or the east-west alignment either for decades.

I'd be surprised if the OL wasn't one day extended to at least Sheppard.
 

Rainforest

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Why not just increase frequency on Lakeshore West? It is bananas to build a parallel subway line for silly reasons like lack of fare integration, etc.

Definitely not just for the lack of fare integration. But maybe for the more efficient use of the rail corridor space.

Depends on where the bottleneck is. Imagine the bottleneck is between the Exhibition and Union, where we have fully utilized GO tracks without the ability to add more, plus the pair of OL tracks that see decent usage but aren't at capacity. And, there is room inside the rail corridor west of the Exhibition to extend the OL tracks. In that case, extending the OL adds to the total capacity of the corridor.

On the other hand, imagine the bottleneck is west of the Exhibition, so the OL extension would reduce the ability to expand GO service. In that case, GO should be given priority and OL should not be extended, or at least not in the same corridor.

Not sure which assumption is true, but that should determine the utility of the OL extension.
 
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