North Shore Condos | ?m | 22s | Fram | Giannone Petricone

jeicow

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I remember starting a thread for this before, but I can't find it anymore so I'll just post here.

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Location: Hurontario Road and Lakeshore Road, Port Credit
Developer: Fram-Slooker Port Credit Limited
Architect: Ralph Giannone
Planning Docs: http://www5.mississauga.ca/agendas/planning/2007/06_25_07/Item11OZ05024W1Rpt.pdf (WARNING: 11MB final)
Website: http://www.framhomes.com/northshore/
Designation: Residential, Commercial (possibly offices)
Status: Approved by City but appealed to OMB by NIMBYs. However Sales started over a year ago and is close to 80% sold already (developer said Fall '07 start date)
Expected Occupancy: Fall 2009 (unlikely due to probably delayed starting date)
Height: 77m (253 m)- the largest building in the area
Floors: 22 tower (2 podium)
Size: ?
 

jeicow

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If you do look over the final planning report, you'll likely notice a few things:
- The proposed relocation and saving of the historic Grey House to the north end of the property failed to happen when council rejected the proposed relocation of the Port Credit Library. As a result, the historic house was demolished (I should note though, that the developer offered the house to anyone who wanted to save it + $100,000).
- This will require that the reconfiguration of the NE corner of Lakeshore and Hurontario, which will see the removal of the current right hand turn lane (bih plus imo).
- This project was originally proposed as 25 storeys with a 16 storey senior's building to the north. Due to community negotiations though, the 25 building became 22 and the 16 became the current 7 (however this thread is more focusing on the tower, as the senior's building hasn't gone into sales yet). The biggy however, is that the OMB ruled on the site in the early 90s, and nothing bigger than 7 stories was recommended.
- This project faced some of the heaviest NIMBY opposition of any project in Mississauga from what I can remember. The interesting part though, is that the majority of it came from the rate payers group north of Port Credit (Credit Reserve) who actually went out as far as mailing out "literature" to every house in about a 2 km area from this site.
- Hazel was really pushing this project and kept mentioning the ideal location due to the waterfront, parks, close transit, and the future of the Hurontario LRT. The one disappointment though, is that it sounds like nothing much taller than 5-10 storeis will now be allowed on Lakeshore Road going east, but I really hope they flip-flop on that one.
 

Observer Walt

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It's a nice project, and will bring some real class to the NE corner of Hurontario and Lakeshore. Fram-Slokker have established good credentials, with their redevelopment of the St. Lawrence lands just across the street, which has to be one of the best projects in not just Mississauga, but the entire G.T.A.

You are quite right that the backyards of these particular NIMBYs are actually not in the neighbourhood at all. The people in Port Credit itself, both the merchants and residents, were pretty much supportive of this project, although admittedly they did not accept the part about using the Grey House as part of the new library (a mistake IMO, but I don't live in the area). It's a bit frustrating that the Credit Reserve people see fit to spend so much effort interfering.

This is exactly the type of project that should go at this location. I hope it moves forward soon.
 

jeicow

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Almost sold out and hasn't even broken ground yet. According to their website they have 4 units left, the sign outside the office said 5, so I'd say it's in a good position. I noticed that the site has pretty cleared pretty much so I expect construction will start this spring as long as nothing bad goes down at the OMB.

I haven't been in town the last few months so I don't know what's happening with the OMB appeal but from what I can tell the hearing occurred on Oct. 24, but no decision has been posted on what happened there so I guess it's a waiting game. I honestly doubt that anything will change since this building makes sense for this location.
 

BobBob

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Prominent intersection, future LRT, Lakeshore line GO station right there... the location couldn't be better for this sort of intensification.
 

drum118

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I hope the OMB allows the buildings to be higher as it needs to be.

The Grey House could still fit into this development one way or another when the library got shot down. The idea was good, but the NIMBY's had a field day over it. Fran acted to quickly tearing down the house.

I listen to the NIMBY's at the council planning meeting this year and only shake my heads that these folks were off the wall.

They want all the good stuff, but don't want to pay for it. Therefore you need more ppl to spread the cost over, but they don't want them in their area.

The NIMBY's have already kill Hurontario between the Lakeshore and the QEW by allowing what taking place there now.

One supporter stated to council he want to see this building 100 stories tall to say here is Mississauga and a beacon for airplanes flying over the area.

NIMBY's don't want senior's living here and it the same thinking that took place for another senior's project in Clarkson that had the support of the BIA. It got shot down.

That Gas station and the area north of it should be bought up and another couple tall building should go there to make that whole block look a lot better than what it has over past 30 years.

This would be a good trip generator for transit since there is high transit service there now with more to come.
 

doady

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This actually has a nice podium, unlike most the buildings in MCC, and I like how it is all glass (i.e. does not look cheap), also unlike most of the buildings in MCC.

It is sad there is so much opposition to this development, espeically considering the (much uglier) 20-or-so storey building that already exists right across the street.

Port Credit may look nice, but I wouldn't like to live a neighbourhood with those kind of people. I bet there will be opposition to the LRT as well.
 

SP!RE

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Great podium design... and the tower's crown is visually engaging. I like it
 

Tuscani01

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Port Credit may look nice, but I wouldn't like to live a neighbourhood with those kind of people. I bet there will be opposition to the LRT as well.

I swear, if that happens we are all forming a group and attending these meetings just to put those NIMBY's in their place. If they can have a say in something which wont affect them (seeing as the people complaining don't even live around the development) then so should we!
 

jeicow

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Port Credit may look nice, but I wouldn't like to live a neighbourhood with those kind of people. I bet there will be opposition to the LRT as well.
The immediate area was in support of the project. It was north of Port Credit where most of the opposition came from. The Port Credit Ratepayers Association and BIA were in favour of having this baby built.
 

yyzer

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Evolving port in a storm

TheStar.com - living - Evolving port in a storm


ANDREW WALLACE/TORONTO STAR
Mississauga Councillor Carmen Corbasson, says it won’t set a precedent for more highrises in the area. Port Credit
Residents of the former town in south Mississauga want to retain a village feel through a post-industrial evolution that includes intensification.

Homeowners' groups at odds over tower and how best to deal with intensification in south Mississauga

March 01, 2008
Mike Funston
STAFF REPORTER


The approval of a 22-storey condominium tower to be built close to the Mississauga waterfront in Port Credit has residents' groups divided and has sparked fears it could lead to a highrise jungle along Lakeshore Rd.

"This could very well set a precedent for highrise buildings on the north side of Lakeshore going both east and west (of Hurontario St.)," says Ian Smith, president of the Town of Port Credit Association, a 100-household group formed to oppose the condo project called North Shore.

"There are certainly a number of sites along Lakeshore, in terms of the price of land and location, that are ideal for redevelopment and where taller buildings could be accommodated."

His group opposes the project on the grounds that it's "an intrusion into the village-like setting" of Port Credit, with its trendy shopping district and picturesque harbour. Once an independent municipality, it joined Streetsville and the Town of Mississauga to become the City of Mississauga in 1974.

Any redevelopment along Lakeshore should be lowrise upscale commercial or residential, Smith says.

The dispute may be a precursor to other situations in the GTA where established communities with predominantly lowrise and single-family housing may be forced to evolve because of provincial intensification policies. Such policies are aimed at taking better advantage of existing infrastructure, especially within walking distance of major public transit hubs, in an effort to curb suburban sprawl.

The Port Credit Village Ratepayers Association, with about 150-member households, wants to protect the neighbourhood character, too.

But it raised eyebrows in the community by supporting the project, at the northeast corner of Hurontario St. and Lakeshore Rd. E., although it has solid reasons for doing so, says director John David.

The site was limited by a previous Ontario Municipal Board decision to a 10-storey height.

However, that would have occupied most of the land and created a walled effect along Lakeshore and had a more detrimental impact on neighbouring residents, David says.

Instead, the group felt that a taller but narrower building would open up more space and be a better alternative.

"It was a win for us from that perspective and we're also getting a $1-million contribution from the developer for a neighbouring park."

David adds: "We think it will be a good project for Port Credit. It's a strategic corner, a transit hub with a GO station nearby. It will bring more people to the centre of the village and be good for the businesses here as well as community amenities."

The high density can be justified because it is a major transit node and there are no other sites like it in the vicinity, he says, therefore it isn't likely to set a precedent for more such highrises. There is already an apartment building of about 20 storeys, dating back about 40 years, on the opposite side of Hurontario.

The 214-unit project has attracted a flood of buyers, gobbling up condos ranging from $280,000 to $1.5 million, for a choice location near the waterfront, says developer Frank Giannone, of the FRAM/Slokker Group. The company will also build an adjacent seven-storey, 150-unit seniors' apartment building.

The project should be constructed within the next two years.

"We're bringing high-quality architecture that will frame Hurontario St. (combined with the existing highrise) as the entry point to Port Credit," Giannone says, insisting the project "will enhance the atmosphere of a pedestrian-friendly village."

Mississauga Council approved the application last summer after it had been held up for a year while city officials looked for ways to preserve the historic Gray House on site. It was once home to the founders of St. Lawrence Starch Company that was on the south side of Lakeshore, east of Hurontario.

The plant was closed in 1991 and eventually redeveloped by FRAM/Slokker for townhouses, lowrise condos, retail and office use.

The proposal to save the vacant 2 1/2 storey Edwardian-style house, built in 1910, involved using it as a new location for the Port Credit Library and incorporating it into the condo development with towers 22-and 16-storeys high. But overwhelming citizen opposition to moving the library killed that plan and last March the house was legally demolished.

Dorothy Tomiuk, chair of a coalition of ratepayer and community groups that opposed the 22-storey tower, says all "built form" becomes a precedent and there is a threat that it could spark more highrise development along Lakeshore.

Other big developments are probably on the drawing board, she says.

"We're in for an active decade in terms of what's coming down the pipe. At all cost we want to preserve that Lakeshore corridor. If it becomes a canyon it won't be pedestrian-friendly ... and it will obscure the waterfront."

The coalition will "fight to maintain the village ambience that is the secret to Port Credit's success," Tomiuk says. "We're taking what we've learned and trying to be a positive force into the future. All is not lost by any means. One development isn't going to kill us. We'll survive this."

Known as VIVA (Village Inspired Vision Alliance), the coalition includes Credit Reserve Association, the Town of Port Credit Association, Port Credit Village Project, Friends of Old Port Credit Village, Mississauga South Historical Society, Mississauga Heritage Foundation, Walk and Bike for Life and liaises with Lakeview Ratepayers Association.

Councillor Carmen Corbasson, who represents the area, does not believe the project will set a precedent for further highrise development. While another developer has proposed a 21-storey condo near Dixie Rd. and Lakeshore, east of Port Credit, in Lakeview, Corbasson doesn't see it being approved just because the other project was.

"That site is not a major transit node. It's zoned for single-family residential at 6.9 units per acre. They (developers) are proposing 200 units per acre. It's like comparing grapes to watermelons (with the Port Credit site)," Corbasson says.

Mississauga has infill, intensification policies that would see only lowrise projects along Lakeshore, with one or two exceptions that might permit 10-storey buildings, she says.

On Lakeshore, the city wants street-level commercial uses (shops, restaurants) of two-to-three storeys in height with upper level apartments or condos, she says.

"It wouldn't be appropriate to go all the way along Lakeshore with highrises. I just don't see it happening. Developers could always do a land assembly and go to the OMB, which has to follow provincial intensification policy, but at the same time the developers have to demonstrate why it (highrise) would be a better use than what we have there today. I don't think they could do that."

In the Lakeview area between Cawthra Rd. and Dixie, residents would actually welcome some highrise development – in the right places, says Lakeview Ratepayers Association president Jim Tovey.

He'd like to see the industrial-commercial zone south of Lakeshore, which includes the former Lakeview coal-fired power plant, turned into mixed residential, commercial and park use to create something special for the waterfront. Residents are concerned the Lakeview site will be turned into a gas-fired power plant.

There's about 750 metres between Lakeshore and the waterfront, room to accommodate a highrise tower without obscuring the lake, he says.

"It could be right in the middle," adding that his community welcomes smart growth.

Putting some high-density projects in the industrial-commercial zone could take some of the pressure off development along Lakeshore in Port Credit, Tovey says.
 

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