Mirvish Village (Honest Ed's Redevelopment) | 85.04m | 26s | Westbank | Henriquez Partners

AlexBozikovic

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MisterF

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Most people have conservative tastes. If builders knew buyers would pay more for orange buildings, every new development would be orange.
Is there any evidence that colourful buildings like 501 Adelaide or the Well (to name a couple random recent examples) perform worse for investors than their more numerous black and charcoal neighbours? I'm not convinced. It seems more likely that this unfortunate trend stems from the design world more than anything. Architects have taken their love of black turtlenecks and blown it up to building size. The same trend is happening in institutional buildings, which obviously have no investors to worry about.

If investors were as conservative as you say then we wouldn't get buildings like 15 Beverley, which is almost entirely dark grey but anything but conservative in design. If people in general had tastes as conservative as you say, then the most colourful neighbourhoods in the city wouldn't be the most popular.
 

TheKingEast

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Is there any evidence that colourful buildings like 501 Adelaide or the Well (to name a couple random recent examples) perform worse for investors than their more numerous black and charcoal neighbours? I'm not convinced. It seems more likely that this unfortunate trend stems from the design world more than anything. Architects have taken their love of black turtlenecks and blown it up to building size. The same trend is happening in institutional buildings, which obviously have no investors to worry about.

If investors were as conservative as you say then we wouldn't get buildings like 15 Beverley, which is almost entirely dark grey but anything but conservative in design. If people in general had tastes as conservative as you say, then the most colourful neighbourhoods in the city wouldn't be the most popular.

Builders build what will get sold for the cheapest $ possible. They build for their buyers who are in most cases investors. The design figures into that equation. Grey, black, etc all cheaper materials. Green and blue glass, cheaper materials.

You use a few exceptions...I'm not sure why. And yes, people tend to be more conservative in their tastes. You really want to dispute that?
 

MisterF

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Builders build what will get sold for the cheapest $ possible. They build for their buyers who are in most cases investors. The design figures into that equation. Grey, black, etc all cheaper materials. Green and blue glass, cheaper materials.

You use a few exceptions...I'm not sure why. And yes, people tend to be more conservative in their tastes. You really want to dispute that?
What's your source for black and grey brick being cheaper than more traditional colours?

What I'm disputing is the assertion that buyers prefer black and charcoal because they're supposedly conservative. Black and charcoal have only recently become trendy. If buyers were as conservative as you claim they would insist on red, which has been the most common brick colour in Toronto since the 19th century. Red and lighter colours are still by far the most popular brick colours in new house construction, where buyers have direct control over the colour of their homes. In any case, Mirvish Village is all rentals so I'm not sure what buyer preferences have to do with the colour choices here.
 

thaivic

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What's your source for black and grey brick being cheaper than more traditional colours?

What I'm disputing is the assertion that buyers prefer black and charcoal because they're supposedly conservative. Black and charcoal have only recently become trendy. If buyers were as conservative as you claim they would insist on red, which has been the most common brick colour in Toronto since the 19th century. Red and lighter colours are still by far the most popular brick colours in new house construction, where buyers have direct control over the colour of their homes. In any case, Mirvish Village is all rentals so I'm not sure what buyer preferences have to do with the colour choices here.
The reality is that black and grey brick is not cheaper, Belden Brick is actually more expensive in black and grey, i drive by the project every day and it's one of the best street wall in Toronto in a long while, there is plenty of colour and different shades to make it one of the most appealing, the corner house on the south end will be restored back to the original red brick.
 

TheKingEast

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What's your source for black and grey brick being cheaper than more traditional colours?

What I'm disputing is the assertion that buyers prefer black and charcoal because they're supposedly conservative. Black and charcoal have only recently become trendy. If buyers were as conservative as you claim they would insist on red, which has been the most common brick colour in Toronto since the 19th century. Red and lighter colours are still by far the most popular brick colours in new house construction, where buyers have direct control over the colour of their homes. In any case, Mirvish Village is all rentals so I'm not sure what buyer preferences have to do with the colour choices here.

Where did I state that black and grey brick is cheaper?
 

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