Mirvish Village (Honest Ed's Redevelopment) | 85.04m | 26s | Westbank | Henriquez Partners

Johnny Au

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Hopefully this will be a template for future block-long developments in the city.
That template would be good for block-long developments with our without holdouts in the way.

Architects have to take into account potential holdouts as is with the case of the Alternative Thinking holdout within the Mirvish Village plan.
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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*Anxiously awaiting to see what windows they'll be using between those pretty pre-fabs and hoping it won't be G+C fire sale special*
 

afransen

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I'm obsessed with the fact they've used different textures and styles at the pedestrian level. More large developments in the city should take queues from this project in how to keep the pedestrian realm interesting. It is far better than an extended pattern or form that extends full blocks.
I'm kind of surprised that this isn't more commonly used. It has long been well-known in 'new urbanist' circles that having more fine-grained street presence leads to more walkability. Maybe it looks a bit more jumbled in the rendering or some decry it as 'faux' when it is one big building behind it, but it seems to work reasonably well from the pedestrian perspective.
 

AlbertC

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clarkburglar

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will the backs of the buildings on the park (the old houses) have shops or anything or will they just be blank? Also, The backs of the privately owned houses facing the laneway part of the park would be a good place for Toronto to pilot laneway apartment buildings like you can do in places in Vancouver now, since there'll already be a lot of traffic there. It would animate the lane even more.
 
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Northern Light

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On your Twitter feed you ask how the park might hold up to abuse.

The species list will matter.

But I do see some problems in the renders/layout.

While lovely in theory to have people walk a meandering route; most people who use park paths do so to get from point A to point B.

It's just a convenient, nice route.

As such, it's generally a good idea to have paths follow those desire lines (where are people who walk here going, what is the shortest route to get there).

But, you can 'force' people to walk a certain way, if you feel there's a great design reason to do so.

But you have to 'force'.

Note this little Claude Cormier park in the 88 Queen North development:

1616853999437.png

Photo Credit to forum member @skycandy

Cormier installed a little mini-fence to keep people and dogs off his garden.

Whether one uses that method, or seat walls, edges with vigorous shrubs that people just won't choose to walk through; you need to either actively discourage people walking certain ways, or make it easy for them
to walk the way they wish.

You can even do both.

The design referenced in your thread is attractive, but it needs a touch of pragmatism in that regard.

To illustrate this off one of the park renders:

1616855104389.png
 
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Northern Light

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Northern Light

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I agree, and I also think people will let their dogs ravage the plantings if they are not fenced or walled off. Yes, there are numerous other places to take your dog. That never matters.

Agreed, this is a risk. As noted, species list will also matter. There are dog-resistant planting choices; but many L.A.s don't either aren't familiar w/them, or don't want to include them in their design.

There are species that can withstand a fair of bit of dog urine.

And others which can withstand a bit of trodding or digging.

Some others still that dogs just won't want to wander through. (dense shrubbery, plants w/thorns)

Here's a list of plants that can withstand dog urine (I could write a longer one, but it's a good little list)


One cute trick I've seen done, is to have sprinkler heads in a planting bed, that are motion-activated.

Step in a planting bed, get squirted w/water.

Probably not in the parks budget, but still an idea.
 

syn

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On your Twitter feed you ask how the park might hold up to abuse.

The species list will matter.

But I do see some problems in the renders/layout.

While lovely in theory to have people walk a meandering route; most people who use park paths do so to get from point A to point B.

It's just a convenient, nice route.

As such, it's generally a good idea to have paths follow those desire lines (where are people who walk here going, what is the shortest route to get there).

But, you can 'force' people to walk a certain way, if you feel there's a great design reason to do so.

But you have to 'force'.

Note this little Claude Cormier park in the 88 Queen North development:

View attachment 308282
Photo Credit to forum member @skycandy

Cormier installed a little mini-fence to keep people and dogs off his garden.

Whether one uses that method, or seat walls, edges with vigorous shrubs that people just won't choose to walk through; you need to either actively discourage people walking certain ways, or make it easy for them
to walk the way they wish.

You can even do both.

The design referenced in your thread is attractive, but it needs a touch of pragmatism in that regard.

To illustrate this off one of the park renders:

View attachment 308287

You know I when I first saw the images I thought "I'll be curious to read what NorthernLight thinks of this when it's done". Looks like you're years ahead of the rest of us! :p
 

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