Mirvish+Gehry Toronto | 308m | 82s | Great Gulf | Gehry Partners

freshcutgrass

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The City of Toronto's Heritage Property Tax Rebate Program provides eligible heritage property owners with a 40% rebate on their municipal and educational property taxes for the eligible heritage portions of their property. To be eligible for this program, properties must be designated under Part IV or V of the Ontario Heritage Act and subject to a Heritage Easement Agreement (as of September 30, 2006).


The Toronto Heritage Grant Program encourages the conservation of properties designated under Part IV or V of the Ontario Heritage Act in the City of Toronto through matching grant funding of up to 50% of the estimated cost of eligible heritage conservation work. Details about eligibility requirements, the application process and public workshops are available on our website.


Are the Mirvish buildings listed or designated?

Being listed doesn't mean said building can never be altered or demolished....it just means before anything happens it needs to be reviewed by the city.
 

Guy Typing

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An updated design, and it's getting more busy.

(Edit: Sorry, I read a recent article and thought it was a new update, not a month old one.)

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Xray_Crystal_Junkie

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It's not so much to fit in but act as a bit of a sort of tribute to the history of the neighbourhood. The wooden beams of historic warehouses are found inside and unseen from the street. That and they add warmth to an otherwise very modern design.

But I bet you would deride any Gehryesque design.
 

Critique

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I dont mind if it does look "busy". I think in this case more really is MORE. The whole thing is a vision and a dream made real and that is what it looks like. At the end of the day, this is going to be one complicated but a really amazing addition to Toronto. I don't think anyone should worry about this looking ugly in the end.
 

SP!RE

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LET THERE BE LEAKS!

Still loving the idea of sculptural wooden columns along the street though. That would be beautiful, and unique in a high-rise project.
 

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these buildings will be the largest project Gehry has ever taken on. I can't understand the apprehension. 10 yrs from now the city will say, what were they thinking back in 2013. People who love architecture will come from around the world, specifically, just to see them.

found this article in Vanity Fair: http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2010/08/architecture-survey-201008

What is the most important piece of architecture built since 1980? Vanity Fair’s survey of 52 experts, including 11 Pritzker Prize winners, has provided a clear answer: Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao.

In February 1998, at the age of 91, Philip Johnson, the godfather of modern architecture, who 40 years earlier had collaborated with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe on the iconic Seagram Building, in Manhattan, traveled to Spain to see the just-completed Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. He stood in the atrium of the massive, titanium-clad structure with its architect, Frank Gehry, gesturing up to the torqued and sensually curving pillars that support the glass-and-steel ceiling and saying, “Architecture is not about words. It’s about tears.” Breaking into heavy sobs, he added, “I get the same feeling in Chartres Cathedral.” Bilbao had just opened its doors, but Johnson, the principal apostle of the two dominant forms of architecture in the 20th century—Modernism and Postmodernism—and the design establishment’s ultimate arbiter, was prepared to call it on the spot. He anointed Gehry “the greatest architect we have today” and later declared the structure “the greatest building of our time.”

Can someone explain how a city councillor (who's a high school teacher or something along those lines) might advise Gehry on adjustments to the project?
 
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junctionist

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Can someone explain how a city councillor (who's a high school teacher or something along those lines) might advise Gehry on adjustments to the project?

Gehry doesn't live here and may not know much about what the local needs and concerns are. (He grew up here but moved to California a long time ago.) He could design the world's most spectacular building, but it might dump chunks of snow and ice on the sidewalk from its curving facade every winter. The building could shadow important public spaces. Local materials might be suggested for the project that could look amazing and represent Canada better. So Gehry can gain valuable advice from informed locals.
 

adma

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Can someone explain how a city councillor (who's a high school teacher or something along those lines) might advise Gehry on adjustments to the project?

It's been done, re his AGO work. Nothing's as cut-and-dried as "Hail, Supreme Genius"--community consultation is always good. (Probably even happened viz. Bilbao.)
 

TheTigerMaster

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Gehry doesn't live here and may not know much about what the local needs and concerns are. (He grew up here but moved to California a long time ago.) He could design the world's most spectacular building, but it might dump chunks of snow and ice on the sidewalk from its curving facade every winter. The building could shadow important public spaces. Local materials might be suggested for the project that could look amazing and represent Canada better. So Gehry can gain valuable advice from informed locals.

For the life of me I can't figure out shadowing is a legitimate concern for this project. It's on the north side of King Street, so that means that there is zero chance of this building ever casting a shadow on King Street or the public park just south of it. Nor will the shadows be close to any low rise residential areas or public spaces, so we don't have to worry about these buildings casting a shadow on someones flower garden for two hours a day.
 

E.B.

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It's been done, re his AGO work. Nothing's as cut-and-dried as "Hail, Supreme Genius"--community consultation is always good. (Probably even happened viz. Bilbao.)

Did you even read the excerpts of the article quoted or the link?

A survey of 52 experts, including 11 Pritzker Prize winners, has provided a clear answer: Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. They're the ones saying "Hail, Supreme Genius".

"Philip Johnson, who 40 years earlier had collaborated with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe on the iconic Seagram Building, "the principal of the two dominant forms of architecture in the 20th century—Modernism and Postmodernism—and the design establishment’s ultimate arbiter, was prepared to call it on the spot. He anointed Gehry “the greatest architect we have today”

Regarding this project, Gehry has said he would take into consideration community needs. What he's not willing to do is accept advice from a councillor who suggests things like "can you integrate the front of a warehouse into your design". A warehouse? really? How about we put a hat on the Mona Lisa or put Tom Cruise in the Godfather.

With respect to the falling ice issue, we should see if his "curved" building in N.Y. has that problem?
 
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adma

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Did you even read the excerpts of the article quoted or the link?

A survey of 52 experts, including 11 Pritzker Prize winners, has provided a clear answer: Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. They're the ones saying "Hail, Supreme Genius".

Yeah, but my point is: those 52 experts are judging a fait accompli. The thing is: even with Bilbao, Gehry wasn't working within a simple "Supreme Genius, do what you may" vacuum--almost certainly, there was give-and-take w/the community there, too...
 

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