Lower Don Lands Redevelopment | ?m | ?s | Waterfront Toronto

globalexpress

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From my previous post ... https://urbantoronto.ca/forum/threa...waterfront-toronto.3363/page-183#post-1662675 Here are similar shots but taken at night. Again, shot from my balcony in the Distillery District.

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Northern Light

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I think this is where we are sticking info on the extension of Flood Protection to the East Habour site.

If not, the Mods can shift this where it belongs.

The E.A. for the extension of Flood Protection to the East Habour area has wrapped (subject to notice of completion and Ministry approval)

The report on same is headed to the March 23rd meeting of the Infrastructure and Environment Committee:

Link here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2021/ie/bgrd/backgroundfile-164827.pdf

The report recommends phasing the work.

While detailed design and construction remain unfunded to date; staff actually recommend proceeding to detailed design to the 60% threshold this year.

That would strongly suggest that money is anticipated to flow.

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Cost estimates for the total project show a range in current dollars from $259-284 Million.
 
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UtakataNoAnnex

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adHominem

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UtakataNoAnnex

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Unlikely, it's literally brand new – new storm water treatment facility, as noted on the previous page:
Sorry, I completely missed that...

...but I am glad this isn't some Brutalist structure from the 70/80's that was on he chopping block to make way for something "newer". I am even more glad it's a Brutalist structure of much more recent affair, as this an artform that hasn't been entirely forgotten or ignored.
 

condovo

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^^^ Brutalist buildings from the mid-to-late 20th century didn't have that kind of faceted form. That's contemporary. We should enjoy it while it lasts. It's going to get pummelled with tagging in 3-2-1...
 

UtakataNoAnnex

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^^^ Brutalist buildings from the mid-to-late 20th century didn't have that kind of faceted form. That's contemporary. We should enjoy it while it lasts. It's going to get pummelled with tagging in 3-2-1...
To me, raw formed concrete without any prefabrication would classify any building as such, including this one. So my only offense is likely I did not stick the prefix of "Neo" before it. That said, if it walks like a duck and quacks like a one...

Furthermore, isn't Brutalism contemporary? I mean it's certainly not classical.

...and finally, if they board formed that structure, it would likely made it more difficult surface to tag or bomb on. /shrug
 
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44 North

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Apologies if this has been discussed before, but at the NE corner of Logan/Commissioners there's something neat I noticed recently. Looks like a mobile power plant. Never seen anything like it before. Says energy storage, but why store energy down there? What's it for? Streetview shows it being there in 2019 so not brand new.
 

Automation Gallery

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For all of you that think this area will be all residential/parkland bling, think again,
...they'll have to to build around Ports Toronto cause for the time being the shipping industry isn't going anywhere.

Port of Toronto Moves more than 2.2 Million Metric Tonnes of Cargo in 2020​

TORONTO, March 16, 2021 /CNW/ - For the fourth consecutive year, the Port of Toronto moved more than two million metric tonnes of bulk and general cargo products, which represents another strong year in marine imports for the city. Despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 the Port of Toronto experienced another strong year in steel imports, received the highest cement cargo levels in 16 years, and saw the return of Short Sea Shipping—demonstrating the Port's position as a vital part of Toronto's economic infrastructure and movement of goods.

In 2020, 174 cargo vessels visited the Port of Toronto, offloading a range of containers, bulk, project and general cargo products. Overall, the Port moved 2,208,358 metric tonnes of cargo, bringing road salt, sugar, cement, aggregate and steel directly into the city's core. With the Greater Toronto Area's construction industry showing no signs of slowing down, the port recorded its highest cement cargo imports in 16 years with more than 728,600 metric tonnes delivered through the Port of Toronto last year. The Port also recorded an 11 per cent increase in sugar imports, with 638,283 metric tonnes imported from Central and South America to support Toronto's food and beverage industry. In addition to importing 677,726 metric tonnes of salt and 92,072 metric tonnes of aggregate in 2020, the Port had another strong year for steel products such as steel coils, rebar, plates and rail from Sweden, Spain and Turkey, totalling more than 59,381 metric tonnes.

more...
 
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Northern Light

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For all of you that think this area will be all residential/parkland bling, think again,
...they'll have to to build around Ports Toronto cause for the time being the shipping industry isn't going anywhere.

Port of Toronto Moves more than 2.2 Million Metric Tonnes of Cargo in 2020​

TORONTO, March 16, 2021 /CNW/ - For the fourth consecutive year, the Port of Toronto moved more than two million metric tonnes of bulk and general cargo products, which represents another strong year in marine imports for the city. Despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 the Port of Toronto experienced another strong year in steel imports, received the highest cement cargo levels in 16 years, and saw the return of Short Sea Shipping—demonstrating the Port's position as a vital part of Toronto's economic infrastructure and movement of goods.

In 2020, 174 cargo vessels visited the Port of Toronto, offloading a range of containers, bulk, project and general cargo products. Overall, the Port moved 2,208,358 metric tonnes of cargo, bringing road salt, sugar, cement, aggregate and steel directly into the city's core. With the Greater Toronto Area's construction industry showing no signs of slowing down, the port recorded its highest cement cargo imports in 16 years with more than 728,600 metric tonnes delivered through the Port of Toronto last year. The Port also recorded an 11 per cent increase in sugar imports, with 638,283 metric tonnes imported from Central and South America to support Toronto's food and beverage industry. In addition to importing 677,726 metric tonnes of salt and 92,072 metric tonnes of aggregate in 2020, the Port had another strong year for steel products such as steel coils, rebar, plates and rail from Sweden, Spain and Turkey, totalling more than 59,381 metric tonnes.

more...

Did someone suggest all shipping in Toronto was going to cease?

I don't recall that.

What has been said is that Toronto's shipping is very low and doesn't merit a Federal Port Authority.

That remains true.

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from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamilton-Oshawa_Port_Authority

Toronto's has less than 1/4 of the shipping of Thunder Bay, less than 1/5 of Hamilton, less than 1/7 of Chicago.

Red Path and Road Salt account for fully 1/2 of Toronto's Port activity.
 

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