Lakeside Residences Phase 2 | 147.6m | 43s | Greenland | Hariri Pontarini

ferusian

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New ZBA application submitted:

Development Applications

Project description:
Phase 2 of the 215 Lake Shore Blvd E block. The proposal is comprised of a 43-storey mixed-use building containing 844 residential dwelling units, of which, 110 are affordable housing units. The proposal is comprised of 2728.7 square metres of non-residential gross floor area, and 62,116.70 square metres of residential gross floor area.
 

ferusian

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New ZBA application submitted:

Development Applications

Project description:
Greenland Group + Hariri Pontarini Architects: 43 storeys (147.60 metres including MPH)

Massing models:

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Site Plan:

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Proposed courtyard POPS:

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Automation Gallery

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TheSix

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IMO, I have a feeling the "park" space between the buildings might end up like the failed park hugging Monde's West side. But maybe Lakeside's north facing buildings will help shelter this outdoor space from the highway?

In reality I worry about how much use it will get. It's right up against a noisy highway and there is a beautiful green space across the street at the water's edge. While the plan is nice, it's far from a destination that will draw people to the highway (like the underpass skate park). I wonder if some elaborate art piece would have a better chance at making this nook more vibrant and interesting?
 

mjl08

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IMO, I have a feeling the "park" space between the buildings might end up like the failed park hugging Monde's West side. But maybe Lakeside's north facing buildings will help shelter this outdoor space from the highway?

In reality I worry about how much use it will get. It's right up against a noisy highway and there is a beautiful green space across the street at the water's edge. While the plan is nice, it's far from a destination that will draw people to the highway (like the underpass skate park). I wonder if some elaborate art piece would have a better chance at making this nook more vibrant and interesting?

Or the terribly botched June Callwood Park.
 

Northern Light

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IMO, I have a feeling the "park" space between the buildings might end up like the failed park hugging Monde's West side. But maybe Lakeside's north facing buildings will help shelter this outdoor space from the highway?

In reality I worry about how much use it will get. It's right up against a noisy highway and there is a beautiful green space across the street at the water's edge. While the plan is nice, it's far from a destination that will draw people to the highway (like the underpass skate park). I wonder if some elaborate art piece would have a better chance at making this nook more vibrant and interesting?

I too perceive problems w/the park here.

I don't feel that Sherbourne Common North, which you reference is badly sited or shaped; but its detailed elements aren't all that people-friendly.

As people here may know, I often pick on Janet Rosenberg for her tendency for people-unfriendly park designs.

Its a thing that's happened more than once in this City, and it isn't just her.

There is a certain element in the L.A. (landscape architecture field) that mistakes parks for art galleries.

I love art.

I value design.

But what I often see is a park that looks good on paper but few people enjoy.

We've seen that at June Callwood, at Lisgar, a few parks by Janet; and Sherbourne Common north.

There is a failure to see the park as something to be enjoyed, not merely looked at.

I may start a thread on bad park design...... LOL
 
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mjl08

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We've seen that at June Callwood, at Lisgar, a few parks by Janet; and Sherbourne Common north.

There is a failure to see the park as something to be enjoyed, not merely looked at.
I find that many small urban parks with lots of bells and whistles fail because they are trying to do too much.
 

Northern Light

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I find that many small urban parks with lots of bells and whistles fail because they are trying to do too much.

That can be a part of it.

But it's also a failure to perceive the basics of how most people enjoy a park.

I will do the thread on bad park design sometime soon.

Suffice to say, there are important questions to ask.

Is this park a 'destination', if so, why?

If not, then the park is a through space, or an accent space for a local community.

****

Many L.A.s want to make every park a destination.

But as you note, they may lack the area to do so; or a correctly sited space.

Narrow spaces between buildings can be a nice park-like space; but they can't be 'destinations', there's insufficient room.

****

But there's also just some very common mistakes around human behavior.

Why would someone walk this way?

Why would they stay/sit here?

At any rate, I'll provide examples in the thread I create showing why some ideas work, and some don't.
 

BTB

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Respectfully, I disagree with the negative comments about Sherbourne Common North. I live at Monde and don’t consider this a ‘failed park hugging Monde’ - it existed before Monde was built. It has a playground that attracts young children to play and has a serenity during the very hot days of Summer. The water features called "Light Showers", by artist Jill Anholt are wonderful, especially at night when they change colours. Actually, it’s more than a park. Sherbourne Common is the first park in Canada to integrate an ultraviolet (UV) facility for neighbourhood-wide stormwater treatment into its design. The UV facility for East Bayfront’s stormwater management system is located in the basement of the park’s Pavilion. Collected stormwater is treated in the UV facility and released from three art sculptures into a 240-metre long water channel – an urban river that crosses from Sherbourne Common north to south – and back out to Lake Ontario. I’d say that’s pretty cool!
 

Northern Light

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Respectfully, I disagree with the negative comments about Sherbourne Common North. I live at Monde and don’t consider this a ‘failed park hugging Monde’ - it existed before Monde was built. It has a playground that attracts young children to play and has a serenity during the very hot days of Summer. The water features called "Light Showers", by artist Jill Anholt are wonderful, especially at night when they change colours. Actually, it’s more than a park. Sherbourne Common is the first park in Canada to integrate an ultraviolet (UV) facility for neighbourhood-wide stormwater treatment into its design. The UV facility for East Bayfront’s stormwater management system is located in the basement of the park’s Pavilion. Collected stormwater is treated in the UV facility and released from three art sculptures into a 240-metre long water channel – an urban river that crosses from Sherbourne Common north to south – and back out to Lake Ontario. I’d say that’s pretty cool!

The water feature is cool.

But there are most certainly design flaws in the park.

Have a look see and comment on my post about the park in the Problematic Park Design thread............here:

 

BTB

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The water feature is cool.

But there are most certainly design flaws in the park.

Have a look see and comment on my post about the park in the Problematic Park Design thread............here:

I stand by my comments. There are many of us who live in the neighborhood and enjoy the entire Sherbourne Common park immensely - the water features, the playground and seating areas that have a great view of these features and it’s close proximity to the Lake. The south portion borders the Lake with a great Promenade and has a Splash Pad in the Summer and Skating rink in the Winter. It’s a great area for families, dog owners, residents and visitors - I meet many visitors on my strolls. I think these human experiences far outweigh your technical critique...
 

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