KING Toronto | 57.6m | 16s | Westbank | Bjarke Ingels Group

Undead

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There are too many people stuck in the suburban mentality where driving or owning a car is a must and are not very open to more efficient options for getting around.
Because we're not building those options for the most part. Yes, this project is located such that transit and walking are highly viable options. But go a little further out into the suburbs and active mobility/transit quickly become significantly less viable for getting around.
 

crumplescotch

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I do find it somewhat disappointing that the underground parking has to empty out onto King street.

I don't think that this is the case, King Street Transit Priority Corridor not only mentions inability to park directly on King but also inability to take left turns, so underground parking entrance directly from King street is highly unlikely. If you look closely on the construction photo you can see that parking entrance probably leads towards Wellington Street instead:

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Be that as it may, the necessity of 3 levels of parking at this location is questionable at beast.

Hopefully someday they will remove car infrastructure from all of the downtown and adjacent neighborhoods altogether and replace it with proper transit.
Just dreaming out loud.
 
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crumplescotch

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Because we're not building those options for the most part. Yes, this project is located such that transit and walking are highly viable options. But go a little further out into the suburbs and active mobility/transit quickly become significantly less viable for getting around.

It's a city planning issue. Having lived in many neighbourhoods, I can safely say that most of Toronto "proper" is walkable/transitable enough to not own a car. Boroughs... not that much, but areas around ttc stations and other transit are fine. Suburbs, on the other hand, are boring, car infested wastelands where there is nothing to do, nothing to see and nowhere to walk. Just roads, highways, parking lots, plazas and shopping centres. Suburban codes that exist do not take humans into equation, it's like it's implied that suburbanites actually are cars, like in the "Cars" cartoon. Also, I'm sorry, but who actually needs to go to the suburbs, like ever? Apart from the people that actually live there? And even if you do need to go there for some weird reason, just use car sharing, it's still more affordable than owning a car.

We better start replacing half empty giant parking lots around GO/light rail stations with some mix use, mix density neighbourhoods instead of building single family houses in the middle of nowhere. It's what they do in the city (and in most of the developed countries) and it simply works. Maybe then the rest of the developed world will take our planning seriously.

That being said, KING project is not being built in the area with poor planning, probably for buyers that don't have suburbanite mentality, hence let's leave these car/parking complaints out of it.

Sorry for off topic by the way.
 
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neuhaus

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Also the King West and Entertainment District is often visited by 905’ers (mostly on the weekends) due to the club/bar scene that it creates a huge influx of vehicular traffic in these areas. Luckily, I tend to go to bed early and don’t experience all sorts of chaos, crime and mischef that goes on late at night — my partying ways has past ages ago and now a responsible mature adult, lol!
I have public parking on the first level of my parking garage, after a Friday and Saturday night that level is littered in urine, vomit, fast food wrappers/containers, and empty bottles and cans. Classy 905’ers (and DB city dwellers)!
 

daptive

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Also the King West and Entertainment District is often visited by 905’ers (mostly on the weekends) due to the club/bar scene that it creates a huge influx of vehicular traffic in these areas. Luckily, I tend to go to bed early and don’t experience all sorts of chaos, crime and mischef that goes on late at night — my partying ways has past ages ago and now a responsible mature adult, lol!
I have public parking on the first level of my parking garage, after a Friday and Saturday night that level is littered in urine, vomit, fast food wrappers/containers, and empty bottles and cans. Classy 905’ers (and DB city dwellers)!

I fully understand the distaste for the fights and general debauchery that can go down. But I also wish the city could just invest in more public washrooms and garbage bins that aren’t broken or filled to the brim.

Why can’t the city recognize areas that are highly visited and install according infrastructure!?
 

matthew921

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My parents bought me a unit at Vancouver House not too long ago, that was also developed by Westbank. Recently, there's been leaking in our building (it's 2 year old building). It's making me a bit worried with this project.
 

UrbanOzz

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My parents bought me a unit at Vancouver House not too long ago, that was also developed by Westbank. Recently, there's been leaking in our building (it's 2 year old building). It's making me a bit worried with this project.
i wouldn't worry about that. leaks are going to happen. what kind of leak anyways?
 

egotrippin

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It's a city planning issue. Having lived in many neighbourhoods, I can safely say that most of Toronto "proper" is walkable/transitable enough to not own a car. Boroughs... not that much, but areas around ttc stations and other transit are fine. Suburbs, on the other hand, are boring, car infested wastelands where there is nothing to do, nothing to see and nowhere to walk. Just roads, highways, parking lots, plazas and shopping centres. Suburban codes that exist do not take humans into equation, it's like it's implied that suburbanites actually are cars, like in the "Cars" cartoon. Also, I'm sorry, but who actually needs to go to the suburbs, like ever? Apart from the people that actually live there? And even if you do need to go there for some weird reason, just use car sharing, it's still more affordable than owning a car.

We better start replacing half empty giant parking lots around GO/light rail stations with some mix use, mix density neighbourhoods instead of building single family houses in the middle of nowhere. It's what they do in the city (and in most of the developed countries) and it simply works. Maybe then the rest of the developed world will take our planning seriously.

That being said, KING project is not being built in the area with poor planning, probably for buyers that don't have suburbanite mentality, hence let's leave these car/parking complaints out of it.

Sorry for off topic by the way.
The whole looking down on the suburbs mentality is quite tiresome, and besides, different people want different things at various stages of their lives. I've lived in multiple environments in the GTA; rural, urban and suburban, and there are positive and negative qualities to all of them. I agree we need to increase density and reduce car reliance in the suburbs, but not everybody wants to live in a busy city core either. Besides, there's plenty to do in the suburbs; if anything the retail and dining landscapes will only get better as small, independent businesses continue to get priced out of the core. Most new condos fail at producing a fine grained retail landscape, instead creating large units that get snapped up by ubiquitous chains.
 

drum118

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Saw the Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest) in Milano a few days ago and look forward to see how this project turn out as both are night and day to each other. Given the fact that Bosco Verticale (Vertical Forest) is almost 8 year old, some trees and shrubs need trimming and replace, but it is a small amount to what is there now.

A lot of roofs around the city have trees
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