Hurontario-Main LRT | ?m | ?s | Metrolinx

Mercenary

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I really wish the LRT was elevated. Preferably from Eglinton up to Dundas. Could have helped with the traffic.
 

DopeyFish

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Calling it 10!? What? :)

I think hurontario is highway 10

much like lake shore is highway 2 (or at least was)

455e0o.jpg
 

Transportfan

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I think hurontario is highway 10

much like lake shore is highway 2 (or at least was)

View attachment 373778

But try to find anyone who labels a street running through an older area with an LRT line in a "real" city by it's highway number with a straight face though, whether it has still has one or not...
 

bangkok

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W. K. Lis

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But try to find anyone who labels a street running through an older area with an LRT line in a "real" city by it's highway number with a straight face though, whether it has still has one or not...
Wasn't Yonge Street Highway 11?

From link.

Highway 11 was first established in 1920. The highway began in Toronto and followed Yonge Street to Bradford and Barrie. The highway then continued north to Orillia and ended at the Severn River. Beyond the Severn River, the road was maintained as a Northern Development Trunk Road, which did not have a highway number. The trunk road went as far as North Bay, but it did not proceed any further. The Government of Ontario sought to improve access to the booming Timiskaming and Cochrane Districts, as it was felt that improved road access to these regions was vital in order to ensure their ongoing prosperity. Construction began on an extension to the trunk road from North Bay to Cobalt in 1925, to permit traffic to enter the Timiskaming District from the south. The trunk road was completed and officially opened to traffic on July 2, 1927. The trunk road was named the Ferguson Highway, in honour of Premier G. Howard Ferguson. Premier Ferguson was one of the largest proponents of northern development and procured the construction of many new trunk roads including the North Bay to Cochrane Trunk Road. The trunk road from the Severn River to North Bay soon became known as the Ferguson Highway as well, even though it wasn't actually part of the highway that Ferguson's Government had constructed. The Ferguson Highway was gradually extended from Cochrane to Hearst in the late 1920s and early 1930s. In the mid-1930s, the Department of Highways of Ontario (DHO) amalgamated with the Department of Northern Development (DND). The DHO assumed responsiblity for the trunk roads previously maintained by the DND, including the Ferguson Highway from Severn River to Hearst. The entire Ferguson Highway was designated as Highway 11 in 1937.

During the late 1930s, an access road was built from Highway 17 at Nipigon to the booming gold mines near Geraldton. During World War II, a road was completed between Geraldton and Hearst, forging a new highway link across Northern Ontario. This new road was technically the first Trans-Canada Highway, because the famed Trans-Canada Highway around Lake Superior via Wawa was incomplete until the 1960s. Upon the road's completion in 1943, the entire highway from Hearst to Nipigon was designated as Highway 11. For many years, Highway 11 ended in Nipigon. In the 1950s, construction got underway to provide a new highway link between Thunder Bay and Fort Frances. Initially, this highway was known as Highway 120, but the road was later designated as an extension of Highway 11. In order to do this, the DHO had to sign a 180 km section of Highway 17 concurrently with Highway 11 between Nipigon and Shabaqua Corners and redesignate a section of Highway 71 from Fort Frances to Rainy River as Highway 11. The new highway from Thunder Bay to Fort Frances was completed in 1965. The new highway link boasted an impressive 4.8 km (3 mile) causeway across Rainy Lake. The new Highway 11 link greatly reduced the highway distance between Fort Frances and Thunder Bay. It also marked the completion of Highway 11, which now covered a distance of almost 1,900 km. Highway 11 was designated as a Trans Canada Highway route from North Bay to the Highway 71 Junction near Emo during the 1960s.
During the late 1990s, the section of Highway 11 from Lakeshore Boulevard in Toronto to the Highway 400A & Highway 93 Junction at Crown Hill near Barrie was formally decommissioned as a King's Highway.
Hwy11map-1928_sm.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it existed before the extension into Northern Ontario in 1937.

Hwy11map-1997.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it existed prior to 1996.

Hwy11map.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it appears today.
 

Transportfan

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Wasn't Yonge Street Highway 11?

From link.



Hwy11map-1928_sm.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it existed before the extension into Northern Ontario in 1937.

Hwy11map-1997.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it existed prior to 1996.

Hwy11map.jpg
Route of King's Highway 11 as it appears today.

Yonge St. was Hwy. 11 as far north as Barrie only, and not even that was fully synonymous. The section of 11 between Holland Landing and Bradford was not Yonge. Guinness listed Yonge as the longest street in the world because they believed the claim that Yonge and 11 were one and the same throughout. They removed the record after the section between Toronto and Barrie was downloaded--even though that would not have shortened Yonge even if the two were synonymous before.

As for Hurontario St./Hwy 10, they were never fully the same either. Hwy. 10 splits from Hurontario in Orangeville and runs as a gravel road one concession east up to Hwy. 89. It breaks up and has several names before becoming former Hwy. 24. up to Collingwood, where it ends. Hwy 10 goes northwest from Hwy. 89 (Shelburne) and ends in Owen Sound . Both run between Lakes Ontario and Huron, but they split apart. This thread explains it

But at the end of the day, what I was saying is that nobody really actually calls named streets in tradition cities "Highway X" in normal speech
 

ARG1

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Yonge St. was Hwy. 11 as far north as Barrie only, and not even that was fully synonymous. The section of 11 between Holland Landing and Bradford was not Yonge. Guinness listed Yonge as the longest street in the world because they believed the claim that Yonge and 11 were one and the same throughout. They removed the record after the section between Toronto and Barrie was downloaded--even though that would not have shortened Yonge even if the two were synonymous before.

As for Hurontario St./Hwy 10, they were never fully the same either. Hwy. 10 splits from Hurontario in Orangeville and runs as a gravel road one concession east up to Hwy. 89. It breaks up and has several names before becoming former Hwy. 24. up to Collingwood, where it ends. Hwy 10 goes northwest from Hwy. 89 (Shelburne) and ends in Owen Sound . Both run between Lakes Ontario and Huron, but they split apart. This thread explains it

But at the end of the day, what I was saying is that nobody really actually calls named streets in tradition cities "Highway X" in normal speech
I do, and there's nothing you can do to stop me😆
 

sixrings

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Sure it was but who calls it Highway 11 today, or even 50 years ago?
Well I find it strange anyone still calls hurontario highway 10. Nothing about it screams highway and it just makes me think people are living in the past. I can understand people calling Rogers centre skydome because it’s fundamentally the same building with a corporate name attached. Hurontario looks vastly different today than what it did in the 90s yet alone the 50s.
 

W. K. Lis

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Sure it was but who calls it Highway 11 today, or even 50 years ago?
University Avenue, Avenue Road, and Oriole Parkway were Highway 11A in Toronto.

Hwy109map.jpg
From link.

Why would someone want a light rail rapid transit along Highway 10?
hwy10-5_lg.jpg
From
Junction of Hwy 7 & Hwy 10 at Westervelt Corners north of Brampton, facing south along Hurontario Street in 1930.
This photo shows the original directional intersection at the Hwy 7 & Hwy 10 Junction north of Brampton. For many years, Hwy 7 & Hwy 10 shared a short concurrent routing between this highway junction at Westervelt Corners (located at the present-day intersection of Bovaird Drive & Hurontario Street) and Downtown Brampton. The two highways shared this route from the time route numbers were first introduced on Ontario Highways in 1925 up until the early 1980s, when Hwy 7 was rerouted along Bovaird Drive and the newly-built Hwy 410. Note the pre-King's Highway triangular Ontario Provincial Highway signs and the unusual square "STOP" sign at right.
Compare this 1930 photo to this 2004 photo of the same intersection.
hwy7-57_lg.jpg
 

Deadpool X

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University Avenue, Avenue Road, and Oriole Parkway were Highway 11A in Toronto.

Hwy109map.jpg
From link.

Why would someone want a light rail rapid transit along Highway 10?
hwy10-5_lg.jpg
From
Junction of Hwy 7 & Hwy 10 at Westervelt Corners north of Brampton, facing south along Hurontario Street in 1930.

Compare this 1930 photo to this 2004 photo of the same intersection.
hwy7-57_lg.jpg
I am not sure if I understand your response. I was asking who calls Yonge Street Highway 11 anymore and you replied by saying some other roads were called Highway 11A. Then you shared some old and new photos of Hurontario.
 

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