Hurontario-Main LRT | ?m | ?s | Metrolinx

sixrings

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If it is so close which I agree it is then it should have had an extra stop or a extra long underground platform. Either way this is far from ideal.
Actually, that is what happened. There was going to be one more stop in Port Credit on Port Street East, one block south of Lakeshore.

Before Brampton narrowly rejected the Main Street section (to appease old rich white guys) Mississauga cut the LRT back to Port Credit GO to appease NIMBYs there.
Well that’s great. I can walk a quarter mile to dairy cream and then walk another quarter mile back. Pretty sure they were trying to help me burn off that lakeshore ice cream. Epic.
 

junctionist

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Mississauga can claim to be a mature and independent city, but as long as they give in to the whims of NIMBYs on issues like this critical transportation project that should be bringing people to the heart of their vibrant waterfront neighbourhood, they will always be a car-dependent suburb.
 

sixrings

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Mississauga can claim to be a mature and independent city, but as long as they give in to the whims of NIMBYs on issues like this critical transportation project that should be bringing people to the heart of their vibrant waterfront neighbourhood, they will always be a car-dependent suburb.
I was told it was just a 200 m walk. Stop being such an alarmist. ;)
 

nfitz

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It's 230metres from the foot of 10 and lakeshore. Effectively, the thing does end at Lakeshore.
In my mind, Port Credit station was Lakeshore - that's a lot closer than Union subway station is to Queens Quay which is over 500 metres. The connection between the Line 1 and Line 2 platforms at Spadina is 200 metres - 350 metres if you need to walk from the Kendal entrance to the next entrance (which doesn't happen as often now with Presto). The tunnel from the GO/MiWay platform at Kipling is a 250 metre walk to the turnstiles of the subway.
 
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bangkok

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Yup, it's really not that far. It is essentially the length of the two buildings on the left side of the photo.
DJI_0183ce.jpg
 

ARG1

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In my mind, Port Credit station was Lakeshore - that's a lot closer than Union subway station is to Queens Quay which is over 500 metres. The connection between the Line 1 and Line 2 platforms at Spadina is 200 metres - 350 metres if you need to walk from the Kendal entrance to the next entrance (which doesn't happen as often now with Presto). The tunnel from the GO/MiWay platform at Kipling is a 250 metre walk to the turnstiles of the subway.
Exactly. Now in the case of Port Credit vs Lakeshore, having 2 stations here would probably not be the worst thing in the world - Port Credit is going to be extremely well used and as such not much slowdown will occur for having both a station at Port Credit and Lakeshore, but at the same time 200m is virtually nothing. Google Maps claims that's approximately a 3 minutes (which means for most people its 2 minutes) which is absolutely within a range that people are expected to be able to walk to a station no problem. The only actual issue this arrangement might create is with bus connections - having to walk 2 minutes to connect to busses may not be the most attractive situation, but then again that's pretty standard for most subway stations (as well as Yonge/Major-Mackenzie Station on Viva Blue 🤣).

EDIT: As a side note, such a setup with probably result in the shortest distance between 2 stations anywhere in the GTA's LRT network. Even Stevenson Station which many people make fun of for being incredibly redundant and stupid, is 300m and 400m from Albion and Kipling respectively.
 

sixrings

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In my mind, Port Credit station was Lakeshore - that's a lot closer than Union subway station is to Queens Quay which is over 500 metres. The connection between the Line 1 and Line 2 platforms at Spadina is 200 metres - 350 metres if you need to walk from the Kendal entrance to the next entrance (which doesn't happen as often now with Presto). The tunnel from the GO/MiWay platform at Kipling is a 250 metre walk to the turnstiles of the subway.
The point is if it’s this close it should just get to lakeshore and be done with it.
 

drum118

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Well that’s great. I can walk a quarter mile to dairy cream and then walk another quarter mile back. Pretty sure they were trying to help me burn off that lakeshore ice cream. Epic.
That maybe true, but the NIMBY folks kill the plan to have the LRT running on Port St to the river.

By doing so, the city did a transportation study of Lakeshore from end to end that kill the LRT plan more.

In fact, everyone is pushing to have transit underground on the Lakeshore from Mississauga Rd to about Cawthra so car are free to gridlock the area. By doing this, how do you connect the Hurontario Line to the Lakeshore with no station there or having 2 stations on either side of the T junction??? Having interline service going to Long Branch is one thing, but going both way with straight running service is another thing. Riders will sure have to check the front of the LRV's to see if it is their train without going somewhere else. Riders can not do that today with buses.

There is no business case to have an LRT Line west of Mississauga Rd unless you tear all the housing backing onto the Lakeshore down which will never happen in anyone life time. The best you can have west of Mississauga Rd is express buses and better off with 5 minute service.

There is a business case to have an BRT east of Mississauga Rd on the surface. If the city gets it head out of their ass for not allowing taller building than 4-6 story for the east side, you can have an LRT line. Since this LRT line will be under the control of Metrolinx, it will stop at Long Branch and use the Hurontario LRT Line maintenance complex by 407.

If the plan on having TTC running service on the Lakeshore take place, then it has to be TTC gage with the Hurontario Line stopping at the Lakeshore with a station for both lines there. Same for an BRT line. The current Port Credit station is setup to continue underground to the Lakeshore doing a cut and fill method or return to the surface.
 

nfitz

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Yup, it's really not that far. It is essentially the length of the two buildings on the left side of the photo.
Gosh, that's actually closer than I thought. I hadn't realised that the station reached so far south of the GO tracks. Is there a good diagram somewhere? Did they adjust this after they decided not to have a stop at Lakeshore?

I wonder if there's any chance this line would be extended down to Lakeshore and then eastwards - which a terminus at Lakeshore would be more difficult.
 

sixrings

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That maybe true, but the NIMBY folks kill the plan to have the LRT running on Port St to the river.

By doing so, the city did a transportation study of Lakeshore from end to end that kill the LRT plan more.

In fact, everyone is pushing to have transit underground on the Lakeshore from Mississauga Rd to about Cawthra so car are free to gridlock the area. By doing this, how do you connect the Hurontario Line to the Lakeshore with no station there or having 2 stations on either side of the T junction??? Having interline service going to Long Branch is one thing, but going both way with straight running service is another thing. Riders will sure have to check the front of the LRV's to see if it is their train without going somewhere else. Riders can not do that today with buses.

There is no business case to have an LRT Line west of Mississauga Rd unless you tear all the housing backing onto the Lakeshore down which will never happen in anyone life time. The best you can have west of Mississauga Rd is express buses and better off with 5 minute service.

There is a business case to have an BRT east of Mississauga Rd on the surface. If the city gets it head out of their ass for not allowing taller building than 4-6 story for the east side, you can have an LRT line. Since this LRT line will be under the control of Metrolinx, it will stop at Long Branch and use the Hurontario LRT Line maintenance complex by 407.

If the plan on having TTC running service on the Lakeshore take place, then it has to be TTC gage with the Hurontario Line stopping at the Lakeshore with a station for both lines there. Same for an BRT line. The current Port Credit station is setup to continue underground to the Lakeshore doing a cut and fill method or return to the surface.
I was just typing a response when you beat me to it. What happens when there’s a streetcar or lrt on lakeshore. How does it reach this station. This transfer walk is supposed to be good enough. Didn’t we learn anything from the new Kipling bus terminal? But this is an urban forum with people who I generally think of being urban defending this decision. Coffey1 and one city on the other hand…
 

drum118

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I was just typing a response when you beat me to it. What happens when there’s a streetcar or lrt on lakeshore. How does it reach this station. This transfer walk is supposed to be good enough. Didn’t we learn anything from the new Kipling bus terminal? But this is an urban forum with people who I generally think of being urban defending this decision. Coffey1 and one city on the other hand…
I never like the idea of stopping the LRT at Port Credit GO as it fail to service Port Credit itself even thou it was on Port St.

As to your question, it can be one of 5 things. Until the 5 options are water down to 1, its a guessing game as I noted above.

Option 1: Remove all street parking and have only have a single lane in each direction with a surface ROW line. Con: huge bitching for removal of on street parking and patios. Traffic will be line up for miles in both directions since this is the only east-west route south of the QEW that becomes gridlock when something happen on the QEW. Would require a T connection for the intersection to get cars to/from the line. Can have a centre platform for Hurontario and side platforms on Lakeshore on either side of Hurontario.

Option 2: An BRT line on Lakeshore with the Hurontario Line station on the surface or underground. BRT stations same as LRT. Same Con as option 1.

Option 3: Hurontario LRT interline with Lakeshore LRT underground with 3 underground stations. Con: very costly and an operation issue.

Option 4: Lakeshore LRT does not connect with Hurontario LRT with Hurontario LRT returning to the surface and having a centre platform on the south side of the intersection.

Option 5: Same as option 4, but underground with one station for both lines. Con: very costly to do.

One question that needs to be address is how deep will the Lakeshore line be to get under the Credit River as well will there be a single or double train using the Lakeshore Line. It has an impact on the stations east of Hurontario to Mississauga Rd
 

DirectionNorth

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I was just typing a response when you beat me to it. What happens when there’s a streetcar or lrt on lakeshore. How does it reach this station. This transfer walk is supposed to be good enough. Didn’t we learn anything from the new Kipling bus terminal? But this is an urban forum with people who I generally think of being urban defending this decision. Coffey1 and one city on the other hand…
Haven't actually seen Coffey1 and one city in a while. Anyways, I highly doubt that they'll build anything along Lakeshore. There's not enough density along most of it, and where there is density, it would be easier to add a GO station.
 

Admiral Beez

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Mississauga can claim to be a mature and independent city, but as long as they give in to the whims of NIMBYs on issues like this critical transportation project that should be bringing people to the heart of their vibrant waterfront neighbourhood, they will always be a car-dependent suburb.
Mississauga‘s waterfront residents don’t want the masses of Mississaugians that reside above the QEW coming their waty.
 

asher__jo

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Now to get the conversation going of extending Waterfront LRT along lakeshore to connect to this station.
 

sche

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Actually, that is what happened. There was going to be one more stop in Port Credit on Port Street East, one block south of Lakeshore.

Before Brampton narrowly rejected the Main Street section (to appease old rich white guys) Mississauga cut the LRT back to Port Credit GO to appease NIMBYs there.
I think it’s a good thing that Hurontario LRT is not extending to Lakeshore.

From a transportation network perspective, it makes more sense for buses (or any future higher order transit) on Lakeshore to detour the couple hundred metres to the GO station, and for the GO station to be the transportation hub for the area, in order to facilitate transfers between the GO line and various local transit routes.

Extending the LRT to Lakeshore would produce two possible outcomes, neither of which are ideal. First outcome is that transit along Lakeshore is still routed to Port Credit GO to facilitate that transfer, and the extra bit of the LRT becomes a useless stub kind of like McCowan on the SRT. The other outcome is if transit on Lakeshore does not detour to Port Credit GO. This results in a pretty bad situation where anyone trying to travel from somewhere along Lakeshore to Downtown Toronto (or otherwise transferring between GO and Lakeshore) has to transfer onto the LRT and ride for 200m before transferring again. Even then, the LRT station serves little purpose, since it would probably be faster to walk most of the time due to the LRT’s headway.
 
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