Globe and Mail Centre, The | 83m | 17s | First Gulf | Diamond Schmitt

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
10,749
Reaction score
5,666
Location
St Lawrence Market Area
Great shot. Thanks. It'll look a bit neater though whenever that gas station at Front and Sherbourne bites the dust.
While it is true that the gas station at Front and Sherbourne is not pleasant to look at there really is a need for a gas station in the area. Over the last decade most of them have closed and the next nearest are, I think, at Richmond and Jarvis and Jarvis and Wellesley.
 

Skeezix

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Messages
4,343
Reaction score
2,673
Location
East of this, west of that
While it is true that the gas station at Front and Sherbourne is not pleasant to look at there really is a need for a gas station in the area. Over the last decade most of them have closed and the next nearest are, I think, at Richmond and Jarvis and Jarvis and Wellesley.
I think the Shell at Richmond and Parliament is probably closer than the one at Jarvis and Wellesley. The Esso at Church and Dundas may also be closer. But good point - people are not going to stop needing gas, at least not at any point soon. The market will dictate what happens to that station, and the market might not do anything in the near future.
 

Tulse

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
2,376
Reaction score
434
With major developments on two of the corners, I can't imagine the gas station will be there for long -- the market is speaking pretty loudly.
 

rdaner

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 25, 2007
Messages
1,201
Reaction score
235
I have seen developments in Japan that incorporate an open air gas station on the ground floor of an apartment or office tower. Maybe we are ready for such high density solutions.
 

bilked

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
487
Reaction score
897

maestro

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
Messages
7,085
Reaction score
1,877
Well, then the gas stations would make perfect spots for gas fired generating stations if electric cars finally live up to the hype after a hundred years of disappointment.
 

bilked

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
487
Reaction score
897
Sure, just don't tell that to the Norwegians where 37% of all new car sales are EVs and where there's a legislated end game of reaching 100% by 2025.

But from the thread, I clearly digress. I just get excited thinking about the renewal that can occur at all these gas stations pockmarking the inner city once the death knell finally sounds for the internal combustion engine.
 
Last edited:

jje1000

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 19, 2007
Messages
4,371
Reaction score
1,805
FYI electric car sales are heavily subsidized in Norway, paid for by oil money.

That's not necessarily a bad thing though, but it's not that electrics are currently competing with petrol cars on equal footing.
 

bilked

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Sep 13, 2013
Messages
487
Reaction score
897
True, but cost parity soon cometh. In 2010, the U.S. DoE suggested cost parity would be reached when lithium battery cell packs drop to $125usd/kWh. They set a goal of reaching this by 2022. The 2017 Chev Volt has a battery cell cost of $145/kWh. Nearly there. The industry is now forecasting battery costs to drop to $100/kWh by 2020 and to $80/kWh soon after that. I'd hate to be in the horse and buggy business by then.

In any event, the billions of dollars in health care costs (and premature deaths) arising from air borne pollutants directly attributable to the use of ICE vehicles represent a public subsidy of sorts too. If users were required to bear those externalities, the cost of ICES would exceed the unsubsidized costs of EVs by a comfortable margin.
 

Top