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Crosstown LRT | ?m | ?s

JasonParis

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London is a completely different story since there are many key interchanges on the Elizabeth line. In fact, almost every station there is a "key interchange", so opening the line without one, not that big of a deal. The same can't be said about Toronto.
Indeed. Their system is overflowing with resiliency. Something ours doesn't have, although Eglinton and Ontario will certainly help.
 

StroadWarrior

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Was out near Mount Dennis Station the other week and snapped this. For all the issues at Yonge, the stations that are complete do look quite nice.

PXL_20221010_164747672.jpg
 

W. K. Lis

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The traffic signals at Keelesdale Road and Eglinton Avenue West (west of Black Creek Drive) has been activated. (Wonder if they'll rename the street since it's at Mt. Dennis Station, not Keelesdale Station further east at Keele Street. Please don't name after a "Ford".)

Timing is terrible. Needs adjusting or proper detection system. No bus in the left turn lane, but the transit signal goes on.
Transit-Priority-Signal.png


Still using the Ontario only vertical transit signal for buses turning left (south) from westbound Eglinton. In the rest of the world, they would be using a diagonal bar.
fig-10d-01.gif
 

dusk

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Does anyone know if we might be able to use driverless and slightly larger trains (such as those we might expect on the Ontario Line) on the crosstown in the future or are we "stuck" with this size / type of LRT?
 

robmausser

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Does anyone know if we might be able to use driverless and slightly larger trains (such as those we might expect on the Ontario Line) on the crosstown in the future or are we "stuck" with this size / type of LRT?

We are stuck with this type of LRT but not size or brand. But it has to be 100% Low floor.

Right now the trains that can fit are 3 lengths. But, the underground station boxes are long enough to accommodate 4 length trains. So its technically possible to use 4 length trains in the future, but it would require a rebuilding of the underground stations (they would have to move staircases, maintenence rooms, etc and lengthen the platforms) and lengthening the platforms above ground. It would be a lot of work.

Something else they could do is procure some kind of custom LRT car that was entirely 3 car lengths long, adding passenger space in the current voids between the train. Increasing frequency using better transit signal priority would also probably be looked into first as well.
 

AlxOptimism

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Line 5 will be equipped with ATC from day one, with the trains being fully controlled remotely between Mount Dennis and Laird. The drivers will simply be watching for track obstructions and opening and closing the doors. Presumably this could be easily upgraded to allow for fully remote trains with the line being split at Laird or Science station if Leslie was grade separated. Might require PSD. Operating automated would certainly be cheaper operationally, especially as the line is extended to Renfrew/Pearson/further.

As for capacity, the line as it currently stands will likely have sufficient capacity for many years to come, with trains short-turning at Laird/Science Station/Sloan to allow for higher TPH in the higher demand sections of the line. Also platform extensions are plausible as alluded to above. New trains must be low-floor but they could be better designed to use their footprint for more capacity (ex longitudinal seating).
 

robmausser

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Line 5 will be equipped with ATC from day one, with the trains being fully controlled remotely between Mount Dennis and Laird. The drivers will simply be watching for track obstructions and opening and closing the doors. Presumably this could be easily upgraded to allow for fully remote trains with the line being split at Laird or Science station if Leslie was grade separated. Might require PSD. Operating automated would certainly be cheaper operationally, especially as the line is extended to Renfrew/Pearson/further.
I would imagine in the next 20 years we will see technology that allows LRTs at-grade and even in mixed traffic being 100% driverless. If you can get a car to be completely autonomous, its even easier to do so with a vehicle that doesnt need to be steered.

So I could see the entire system being ATC at some point, which with better transit priority would help with increasing service levels.

It could also allow to use the existing cab driver areas as passenger space, increasing capacity by a bit.
 

afransen

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Line 5 will be equipped with ATC from day one, with the trains being fully controlled remotely between Mount Dennis and Laird. The drivers will simply be watching for track obstructions and opening and closing the doors. Presumably this could be easily upgraded to allow for fully remote trains with the line being split at Laird or Science station if Leslie was grade separated. Might require PSD. Operating automated would certainly be cheaper operationally, especially as the line is extended to Renfrew/Pearson/further.

As for capacity, the line as it currently stands will likely have sufficient capacity for many years to come, with trains short-turning at Laird/Science Station/Sloan to allow for higher TPH in the higher demand sections of the line. Also platform extensions are plausible as alluded to above. New trains must be low-floor but they could be better designed to use their footprint for more capacity (ex longitudinal seating).
Really a shame that this decision to split the line wasn't made sooner. Letting the grade separated portion be built as high floor light metro instead with PSDs would not only lower the operating cost but allow the line to operate at higher speeds with shorter dwell times at stations.
 

W. K. Lis

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I would imagine in the next 20 years we will see technology that allows LRTs at-grade and even in mixed traffic being 100% driverless. If you can get a car to be completely autonomous, its even easier to do so with a vehicle that doesnt need to be steered.

So I could see the entire system being ATC at some point, which with better transit priority would help with increasing service levels.

It could also allow to use the existing cab driver areas as passenger space, increasing capacity by a bit.
We'll still need TTC employees (guards? fare inspectors?) to "babysit" the teenagers, gangs, busybodies, etc. on the trains.

Until we are able to get robo-fare inspectors.


Robocop-movie-Peter-Weller-Cyborg.jpg
Presto card, please!
 

officedweller

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Transit-Priority-Signal.png


Still using the Ontario only vertical transit signal for buses turning left (south) from westbound Eglinton. In the rest of the world, they would be using a diagonal bar.
The white vertical bar is also used for bus priority around Vancouver.
There's one at Marine Drive and Taylor Way in West Vancouver (at Park Royal) where it allows the bus to move from the curb lane bus stop before the intersection to the far left through lane (crossing 2 lanes) after the intersection.
 

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