Toronto

98 Queen East | 108m | 35s | Parallax | IBI Group

Northern Light

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
4,017
Reaction score
3,556
Location
Toronto/EY
First and foremost the tower is too far forward on the site (towards Queen)

It's simply too imposing on the heritage buildings.

I'm not sure what the right set back would be; I'm positive it's greater than what we are seeing here, another 5M from Queen for sure.

The preservation of the heritage itself doesn't seem too bad, and the fine-granularity of the retail (or the illusion of it), seems to be retained.

While I"ve seen far worse in towers........I'm not sold on this.

I'm in complete agreement with @jje1000 that the roofline feels wrong. If fact I agree with the rest of what he's saying too.....while we certainly don't want a botched attempted at a historical-esque tower, the modernity here is just crudely juxtaposed with a very different architectural style. It could be contemporary but still feel sympathetic or complimentary to the existing built form. At the very least, less awkward and interposing.

They actually did an ok job w/the new build podium on the corner, and that might have served as a better jumping off point for the tower.
 

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
10,101
Reaction score
4,839
Location
St Lawrence Market Area
This 2009 Streetview below shows the rather fine Richard Bigley building and the ones to its east.

Bigley was described in Toronto Life as:

Who was “Bigley” of the Richard Bigley building at Queen and Mutual?

BY TORONTO LIFE | JULY 11, 2007

Who was “Bigley” of the Richard Bigley building at Queen and Mutual? And is it true that this is the oldest ghost sign in North America?—Hugo Bernier, Downtown
Ghost signs—ancient ads left painted on walls long after businesses have folded and owners have passed on—are scattered around Toronto. (There is a sizable number on Sorauren Avenue, west of Lansdowne.) Most surviving ones date to the early 20th century, and spotters say Bigley’s is indeed the oldest they know of in the city. But since ghost signs are continually uncovered as billboards are removed and adjacent buildings demolished, it’s hard to say what might still be lurking. Richard Bigley went into business as a 22-year-old woodworker in 1875 but later became a well-known man about town by selling the Happy Thought line of stoves (“_‘Grate’ Happiness at Home” promised an 1885 ad in the Globe). The building that bears his name was finished in 1876. As for Bigley, he died in 1933 and was eulogized in the papers as a “noted stove man.” In the 1970s, his little building spawned a giant one: this was where architect Eb Zeidler drew up plans for the Eaton Centre.



bigley.jpg
 

Chopper1953

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
Messages
50
Reaction score
19
I love the lack of balconies -- clean lines... with some setback for terraces, very elegant. I love how the sidewalk is being widened at the corner. I'm surprised they aren't using 98 as the address? for the lucky "8" vs "90"
 

Chopper1953

New Member
Member Bio
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
Messages
50
Reaction score
19
The Developer has added an Info Website, for those who want to track the progress of the Development.

Not surprising it is not 90 Queen East, but www.98queen.com probably a combo of using a "lucky 8" and the crown jewel of the development is the Richard Bigley Building who's address is 98 Queen East not 90.
 

Top