7028 Yonge | 213m | 65s | Gupta | IBI Group

innsertnamehere

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The only thing that can help will be the Yonge subway extension - which is probably 10+ years away from opening still. It should remove the vast majority of the buses navigating this intersection and will likely help with a good chunk of the cars, too.

Of course York Region has been very specific to allocate only a limited amount of units "pre-subway" on this stretch of yonge - with this development, the Vangaurd, and World on Yonge, it's probably all accounted for. Once the subway opens though, there will be a total flood of sewage allocation to this stretch that will result in a huge boom of construction.
 

ProjectEnd

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The only thing that can help will be the Yonge subway extension - which is probably 10+ years away from opening still. It should remove the vast majority of the buses navigating this intersection and will likely help with a good chunk of the cars, too.

Of course York Region has been very specific to allocate only a limited amount of units "pre-subway" on this stretch of yonge - with this development, the Vangaurd, and World on Yonge, it's probably all accounted for. Once the subway opens though, there will be a total flood of sewage allocation to this stretch that will result in a huge boom of construction.
'Sewage allocation' really is the best term for the quality of development we've seen in the area...
 

interchange42

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The only thing that can help will be the Yonge subway extension - which is probably 10+ years away from opening still. It should remove the vast majority of the buses navigating this intersection and will likely help with a good chunk of the cars, too.

Of course York Region has been very specific to allocate only a limited amount of units "pre-subway" on this stretch of yonge - with this development, the Vangaurd, and World on Yonge, it's probably all accounted for. Once the subway opens though, there will be a total flood of sewage allocation to this stretch that will result in a huge boom of construction.
It should be far longer than 10+ years, assuming that the Relief Line won't make it that far north for 20 years: the Yonge line should under no circumstances be extended into York Region before the Relief Line North is in place. Of course, subway capacity will mean nothing to the morons now running Queens Park, so York Region may get its extension long before it should.

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innsertnamehere

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IIRC studies have shown that DRL south + ATC will allow the subway to be extended - but that there won't be a lot of capacity for growth. You'd want to make sure that the DRL north is shortly behind the Yonge subway, though not neccessarily in front of it.
 

interchange42

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Nope, the Relief Line won't take enough ridership off the Yonge Line until it makes it to Sheppard. ATC will only barely cover increased demand for subway service from new developments within Toronto itself. Encouraging more people from York Region to take the Yonge line by extending it north will only clog the line up sooner, meaning not only will Torontonians not be able to find a seat on the Yonge line, they won't be able to get on the trains in many cases.

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sunnyraytoronto

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Source: CityPlanning/TTC - Yonge/Eglinton Midtown Secondary Plan Study
66F31A70-C238-4343-B1E6-B7845796F710.jpeg
 

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Transportfan

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Nope, the Relief Line won't take enough ridership off the Yonge Line until it makes it to Sheppard. ATC will only barely cover increased demand for subway service from new developments within Toronto itself. Encouraging more people from York Region to take the Yonge line by extending it north will only clog the line up sooner, meaning not only will Torontonians not be able to find a seat on the Yonge line, they won't be able to get on the trains in many cases.

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One way to mitigate that problem would be to turn back every second train at Finch.
 

Solaris

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Mind you ... a Torontonian living at Yonge Steeles (south side) is as equally entitled to transit as a downtown dweller ... just because one lives in North York does not discount for the fact they are very much part of the City
 

innsertnamehere

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Mind you ... a Torontonian living at Yonge Steeles (south side) is as equally entitled to transit as a downtown dweller ... just because one lives in North York does not discount for the fact they are very much part of the City
But if you live on the north side? Transit needs to serve all people of Ontario, just just Toronto.

Drawing lines of who "deserves" service more is wrong in so many ways. Transit needs to serve the trips that people want to make, regardless of whether or not they cross a municipal boundary. Instead of complaining about what is "fair", we need to find solutions so that both Torontonians and York Regionians can take the subway... and that involves making sure that the subway has the required capacity to service demand.
 

interchange42

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A Torontonian living at Yonge and Steeles currently has a far shorter ride by bus to the subway than does any Torontonian in Humber Bay Shores, Mimico, New Toronto, or Long Branch, for example. Not having a subway station at Yonge and Steeles does not hurt people at Yonge and Steeles any more than the average Torontonian. What it does is stop an already overcrowded subway line from becoming even more so. Until the Relief Line is built far enough north to divert a sizeable number of riders away from the Yonge line (and Metrolinx says that Sheppard is how far north the Relief Line needs to go to accomplish that), then the Yonge line must not be extended.

It would be great to have a longer Yonge line, but not before the network can handle it.

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Transportfan

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Yes, that way, Torontonians could get on every other train at least! It would be good to leave half the subway for them. Brilliant!

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Perhaps I should have said Steeles?

I said Finch because Finch has both the exiting crossover as well as a pocket track (for less disruptive short turns) north of the station. No need to get snarky.
 

interchange42

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Perhaps I should have said Steeles?

I said Finch because Finch has both the exiting crossover as well as a pocket track (for less disruptive short turns) north of the station. No need to get snarky.
Turning every other train back at Steeles is not the point. The point is that this city needs a better transport network, and extending the Yonge line will not give that to us until such time as there is a Relief Line as far north as Sheppard. If you extend the Yonge line north, you…
  1. cut into funding that should go to higher priorities like the Relief Line, so the Relief Line gets built more slowly
  2. funnel more people into a line that already cannot handle everyone who is trying to ride it, and in effect damage the existing network more
It does not matter where you turn trains back if you are attracting more people to a line that already has too many people on it. The point is this: do not attract more people to the Yonge line until it has additional capacity. The only way to add enough new capacity to it is to divert a good chunk of the existing usage to another line. If you have a vested interest in having the Yonge line extended (close to where you live or work possibly?) then I cannot think of why you would promote having this line extended, it is certainly not for the health of Toronto's subway system.

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