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39 Newcastle 
39 Newcastle St, Toronto
Developer: Dunpar Homes


39 Newcastle | 113m | 36s | Dunpar Homes | Turner Fleischer

Amare

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#61
The residents of Mimico should be scared of the scale of the proposals there's no doubt about it. Although there are various planning documents which mandate the need for increased density around transit stations, they are flawed in the sense that they dont take into account the type of service these stations see or the existing local infrastructure already in place.

Take Milton GO for example, yes that is a commuter rail station but it only has rush-hour service and it is already at capacity. Yet various planning documents would mandate that the area around the station should be built as dense as possible even though the station would never be able to absorb all those residents.

With Mimico that situation doesnt really apply wih the GO station, but the local infrastructure around that area would never be able to absorb the residential influx that would come with all of these projects. The local streets wouldnt be able to absorb increased car traffic, the only main arterial road wouldn't be able to either, and there are no alternatives anywhere in sight. Additionally, the local bus route (the 76 Royal York South) wouldnt be able to handle the influx either no matter how many buses the TTC jammed onto Royal York since both the road and the station it connects to are already constrained.

Essentially my point is, although planning documents mandate a certain density around a major transit node, it really shouldn't be a one size fits all model. The existing neighborhood infrastructure and characteristics must be taken into account.
 

drum118

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#62
The residents of Mimico should be scared of the scale of the proposals there's no doubt about it. Although there are various planning documents which mandate the need for increased density around transit stations, they are flawed in the sense that they dont take into account the type of service these stations see or the existing local infrastructure already in place.

Take Milton GO for example, yes that is a commuter rail station but it only has rush-hour service and it is already at capacity. Yet various planning documents would mandate that the area around the station should be built as dense as possible even though the station would never be able to absorb all those residents.

With Mimico that situation doesnt really apply wih the GO station, but the local infrastructure around that area would never be able to absorb the residential influx that would come with all of these projects. The local streets wouldnt be able to absorb increased car traffic, the only main arterial road wouldn't be able to either, and there are no alternatives anywhere in sight. Additionally, the local bus route (the 76 Royal York South) wouldnt be able to handle the influx either no matter how many buses the TTC jammed onto Royal York since both the road and the station it connects to are already constrained.

Essentially my point is, although planning documents mandate a certain density around a major transit node, it really shouldn't be a one size fits all model. The existing neighborhood infrastructure and characteristics must be taken into account.
When the 3rd track is fully completed to Milton that was supposed to be done in 2011, let alone a 4th track that is really needed, GO can run hourly trains 7 days a week. Once a 4th is in place, you can move to 30 minutes service 7 days a week.

As for Mimico or any other station, as long as parking requirement maintain 1:1 or 1:103, no road is going to be able to carry the increase of cars on local roads. As for the 76, you move from a 40' to 60' bus before you start reducing the headway. Based on the current density plan for the area, 76 would see 5 minute headway using 60' buses once full build out is completed. Even then, it may stay 40' buses only since not everyone will be going to Bloor or the Lake Shore. Because there is no real close shopping to this area at this time, weekend will see more cars on the road so people can shop since the Queensway has poor service today.

I agree that one shape fits all stations is not the answer, but you need a starting point standard to start how density should fit a station.

In the end, a good percentage of residents for this project will use GO to get to/from X.