18 Dalhousie | 173.51m | 54s | Pemberton | Graziani + Corazza

Rascacielo

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In the second and third renderings, the upper part of the tower is at an angle, but in the rest of the renderings , it's aligned with the lower part of the tower. I know the former is depicting the Dalhousie frontage (east and north facades), whereas the rest is showing the Church St frontage (west and south facades), but it seems unlikely the architects will design a tower with such an awkward shape just for the novelty.
 

interchange42

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In the second and third renderings, the upper part of the tower is at an angle, but in the rest of the renderings , it's aligned with the lower part of the tower. I know the former is depicting the Dalhousie frontage (east and north facades), whereas the rest is showing the Church St frontage (west and south facades), but it seems unlikely the architects will design a tower with such an awkward shape just for the novelty.
It's not for novelty, it's for staying out of the helicopter flight path to St Mike's.

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Rascacielo

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It's not for novelty, it's for staying out of the helicopter flight path to St Mike's.

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Is that also why they're keeping the west and south sides flush with the lower part? Otherwise, wouldn't it be easier to just turn the entire upper part at an angle so that they can keep 90 degrees corners and avoid awkward layouts?
 

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I'm not 100% certain on this, but I'll say that developers are more concerned with maximizing the total GFA they'll be allowed on their sites than they typically are with the units that will have some odd angles in them.

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Rascacielo

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I'm not 100% certain on this, but I'll say that developers are more concerned with maximizing the total GFA they'll be allowed on their sites than they typically are with the units that will have some odd angles in them.

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True. I guess it's not their problem if some units have useless spaces because of odd angles. It's up to potential buyers to refuse to buy such units and teach them a lesson that maximizing total GFA doesn't always pay.
 

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147 Church Street - Notice of Intention to Designate a Property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act

This item will be considered by Toronto Preservation Board on December 3, 2021.


Summary
This report recommends that City Council state its intention to designate the property at 147 Church Street (including entrance addresses at 149 Church Street, 18 Dalhousie Street, and 20 Dalhousie Street) for its design, associative, and contextual values under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Constructed circa 1910 for prominent Toronto businessman and contractor Joseph Wright, the property at 147 Church Street spans the shallow block between Church and Dalhousie Streets, and includes a primary elevation on the east side of Church Street and a secondary elevation on the west side of Dalhousie Street. The property is a representative example of the Edwardian Classicism architectural style that was popular for commercial buildings in the early 20th century. The property retains its original scale, form, and massing as a 3-storey flat-roofed building, and its Edwardian Classicism style is reflected in its simple, balanced design and restrained classical detailing.

On June 8, 2018, an Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment application was made for a site at 139-149 Church Street. The original development scheme did not propose the conservation of any portion of the building at 147 Church Street. As a result of continued discussions with the owner in an attempt to resolve outstanding issues, the revised development scheme, at the time of writing this report, involves demolition of the building at 147 Church Street, and panelization and reconstruction of its principal (west) elevation.

In June 2019, the More Homes, More Choice Act, 2019 (Bill 108) received Royal Assent. Schedule 11 of this Act included amendments to the Ontario Heritage Act (OHA). The Bill 108 Amendments to the OHA came into force on July 1, 2021, which included a shift in Part IV designations related to certain Planning Act applications. Section 29(1.2) of the OHA now restricts City Council's ability to give notice of its intention to designate a property under the OHA to within 90 days after the City Clerk gives notice of a complete application.

The application currently under review was deemed complete prior to the new legislation coming into force on July 1, 2021.

Designation will enable City Council to review proposed alterations or demolitions to the property and enforce heritage property standards and maintenance.​


Current view of 147 Church Street, in the centre of this Google street view image here:


147chu.JPG
 

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