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Tolls, streetcars and bus lanes in Montreal's future: transit plan

AnarchoSocialist

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The first part was meant to be sarcastic. The second part was alluding to the fact that there will no doubt be more cases of private interests trying to take advantage of the interest in transit and rail projects.

I actually have no idea whether the Montreal airport shuttle is just a Bleu Vingt-deux. I have tried to find as much information as possible on its status to this point and there is almost nothing about who might operate it or how a link between PET and downtown will be constructed (with the exception of the part being constructed with the Dorval interchange). The fact that AMT was excluded from a relocated PET train station despite the fact it was originally planned to relocate along with VIA does make me suspicous. The other part of the project that it is odd is how the eastern approach to the new PET terminal is well designed and thoughout, yet the western approach really poorly done, almost as an after thought (I will post a picture of it shortly). It seems to have been designed with the shuttle in mind and only minimal consideration for VIA (and now nothing for AMT).

Edit: Here are two pictures of the proposed alignment. It is in red on the first picture, and in pink on the second.





You can see how the approach from the east (the route the shuttle will serve) is well designed with nice geometry. The approach from the west could not be a lazier design. This is the other reason why I wonder what exactly is going on with this project. Had the west side been designed better it could have been a wonderfully functioning station with almost no lose in travel save perhaps a minute. Instead, this is what is proposed.
 

unimaginative2

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I agree that excluding AMT is a mistake, though I don't think the alignment is really a problem. I don't think easing out the angle a little bit on the west side would have any significant impact on travel time, and it could add hundreds of millions to the cost.
 

AnarchoSocialist

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It is not horrible, and if AMT had smaller, more nimble train sets than it might not be such a big deal. But with the sets the use right now, it would add a few minutes of travel time at least to each trip, and, while it might not seem like much, increasing travel time is not a desirable situation.

You can also see the western side of the new PET station alignment is just a single track. While it is not totally unmanagable, this certainly does place more restrictions on volume and scheduling than if there where two tracks.

The original made much more sense. Though this plan is still not bad for the reason that the only part that will be constructed right now is corridor that the PET alignment from the Dorion line to the new train teminal will operate in (essentially the only thing that wont be done is laying the actual tracks). So there are still plenty of opportunites to get the western end changed and return the project to what it was originally supposed to be, with AMT at the new terminal as well. Right now I am just trying to find out what the reasons for the changes are, which has not been easy so far. I am willing to believe that there are logical, technical reasons why this is the plan that currently exists and that the intent is still to achieve the original outcome of the project (which I should add had a budget of around $150-$200 million which would have been enough to construct it properly). Though dodgey, backroom deals are still not out of the question right now.
 

ShonTron

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Seems like an odd alignment for VIA trains too. Most of VIA's passengers at Dorval are those who try to avoid Gare Centrale or live closer, not passengers to and from the airport. I wonder how inconvenient it would be to have to the airport versus the current station, particularly as to how busy Dorval is.
 

AnarchoSocialist

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^Part of the original intent of the new PET station was to create an intermodal terminal that would be suitable for future needs. It is hard to use the current situation to evaluate how many VIA passengers would use the PET terminal to transfer to the airport. But if you consider those living in Brockville, Cornwall, even someone in Ottawa or Kingston flying out of PET, it would probably make it a popular arrival/departure point for VIA travellers (and that is too say nothing of how popular it would be if you also had transfer free connections from the South Shore or other parts of the Montreal region east of Central Station). Though it might not seem like much difference moving the terminal such a short distance, just the elimination of that extra transfer from the train to the airport shuttle to the airport itself will really do a lot to increase the attractiveness of using VIA to get to PET.

For VIA losing a few minutes because of the alignment is not much of a big deal because most trips will be long enough that it would hardly be noticed and could be made up at other points along the way perhaps.
 

unimaginative2

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I wouldn't underestimate the number who ride to Dorval station to catch a flight, especially from Ottawa. That figure would likely jump if the station were right at the terminal. I really don't think that alignment is a big problem. The distance is so short, and the trains will already be travelling quite slowly coming out of the station, so the sharp curve shouldn't be a problem. Many European airport loop tracks look quite similar.
 

AnarchoSocialist

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It is not that the alignment is terrible, but it is certainly mediocre compared to what was originally planned. But, it appears that the western approach is likely just a temporary solution with a proper alignment to be built at a later date.

The reason for AMT not being included in the station actually seem to be their own choice at the moment. While I have not come across a direct quote stating the fact yet, the implied reasoning seems to be that they don't want to contribute financially to the project at the moment and see more benefit keeping their station where it currently is. If they moved it would not only mean reduced parking capacity or more expensive parking costs (plus additional costs for bus terminal facilities) but also mean additional costs for the new western alignment, which, I am guessing is not a high priority for them at the moment.

Overall the project is very well designed so AMT's choice not to relocate now will not affect the long term value of the project. Enough consideration has been given in the design so that when AMT does move to the new PET terminal there will be minimal problems accomodating them. And I still have yet to see exact plans for what the condition will be between PET and Central Station but it looks like they will construct two new dedicated passenger rail tracks to accomodate the shuttle (and perhaps VIA since they are contributing financially to the project).

And I still do not know the operational structure of the PET-Central Station air shuttle. Most references I have seen to it indicate a private operator will be involved, but they do also say that operator would likely be ADM (Aeroport de Montreal) working in partnership with AMT, so, I am still clueless about that aspect.
 

W. K. Lis

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Québec City could have streetcars before Montréal gets their streetcar?

See translation at this link:

Quebec City adopted its Plan of sustainable mobility , which included two tram lines . The City is launching immediately a feasibility study which, surprise surprise, will be funded by the Ministry of Transport of Quebec . It will cost between $ 3.5 million and $ 5M.




[video=youtube;Qz791aWNg6I]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qz791aWNg6I[/video]
 

TOareaFan

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A new rail right of way that will allow VIA and airport shuttle service that will spur off the Dorion-Rigaud line and enter at a new station at PET will be built, regardless of the current status of any projects, as part of the Dorval interchange modernization project. It will include all the flyovers/overpasses necessary and allow them to simply lay down tracks and build a station when the time comes. AMT will continue to use the existing Dorval station though.

What I am wondering about is will it mean new tracks being built just for an airport shuttle? Will new tracks be built but also benefit AMT and VIA? Will it be on existing tracks with shared priority and some upgrades? They might seem like mundane concerns, but, if you followed the story of Blue22 in Toronto (there is a thread on this page actually) then it is easy to understand why I have such an interest in the details of the airport shuttle plan.
Next to Pearson, PET is the airport that I am most often at.....and I have always been struck between the similarities between Dorval and Malton train stations....both have huge potential that has been un-tapped while people seem to look for larger infrastructure solutions.

Both stations have the ability to serve VIA and commuter trains and both are within site of the airport......with a bit of money spent on people mover/shuttle they could become "part of the airport" and provide relatively low cost links between the cities they are in and the airport the sit beside.
 

Platform 27

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Next to Pearson, PET is the airport that I am most often at.....and I have always been struck between the similarities between Dorval and Malton train stations....both have huge potential that has been un-tapped while people seem to look for larger infrastructure solutions.

Both stations have the ability to serve VIA and commuter trains and both are within site of the airport......with a bit of money spent on people mover/shuttle they could become "part of the airport" and provide relatively low cost links between the cities they are in and the airport the sit beside.
I would quibble and say that the gap between PET's terminal and the Dorval train station is something like a quarter of the distance of Pearson to Malton GO---about 800m to 3km, based on my Google Maps eyeballing. That's a significant difference in terms of mentally being "part of the airport."
 

TOareaFan

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I would quibble and say that the gap between PET's terminal and the Dorval train station is something like a quarter of the distance of Pearson to Malton GO---about 800m to 3km, based on my Google Maps eyeballing. That's a significant difference in terms of mentally being "part of the airport."
I don't think I mentioned actual distance...just that they are both within site of the airport and have similar potential.

I think the environment is what makes it feel part of the airport......if the terminus of the peoplemover/shuttle at the train station end felt like the airport, was designed to feel that way, perhaps even with some checkin counters/car rentals/retail/etc and all the public was doing was hopping off the train for a 90 second (or so) ride to their specific terminal, you would create that "I am at the airport" feeling. When people park at the lot at the end of the current people mover and hop on the train, they feel they have arrived at the airport (not their terminal....but the airport) and I think could create that at Malton or Dorval and for a lot less money than a train spur into the aiprort and serve a lot more people at a lot lower fare!
 

dunkalunk

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I don't think I mentioned actual distance...just that they are both within site of the airport and have similar potential.

I think the environment is what makes it feel part of the airport......if the terminus of the peoplemover/shuttle at the train station end felt like the airport, was designed to feel that way, perhaps even with some checkin counters/car rentals/retail/etc and all the public was doing was hopping off the train for a 90 second (or so) ride to their specific terminal, you would create that "I am at the airport" feeling. When people park at the lot at the end of the current people mover and hop on the train, they feel they have arrived at the airport (not their terminal....but the airport) and I think could create that at Malton or Dorval and for a lot less money than a train spur into the aiprort and serve a lot more people at a lot lower fare!
Hmm, This sounds familiar :)

 

W. K. Lis

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Montréal latest plan:

Electrification of the surface system


from this link:

TOMORROW'S MOBILITY COMPLETELY ELECTRIC

Did you know that, in Quebec, transportation accounts for 43% of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)?

The City of Montréal and the Quebec government have therefore decided to reduce transport GHG emissions by 30% and 25% respectively by 2020. And the STM can play an active role in achieving that goal. How?


  • By encouraging more people to use public transit
  • By moving toward electrification

Moving towards a fully electric transit system


The Quebec government's Electric vehicles 2011-2020 action plan aims for 95% of public transit passenger trips to be on electric-powered vehicles by 2030.
By 2025, all new buses will be electric-powered to achieve zero GHG emissions by 2040.

Montréal's métro system, which delivers 50% of all public transit passenger trips in Quebec, has been 100% electric since it opened in 1966.

The hybrid bus


The biodiesel-electric hybrid bus, with an electric motor powered by a diesel generator, is now standard for all public transit systems in Quebec. This first important step will lead to the gradual electrification of the entire surface system.


For Montréal, average of 30% savings in fuel and an equivalent reduction in GHG

Much less noisy

A smoother ride

In anticipation of the arrival of some 200 hybrid buses between 2014 and 2016, a model of this low-floor bus is being tested on a few STM lines to assess its reliability and energy efficiency. It is easily recognizable by its outside markings highlighting the "green" benefits of its hybrid technology. In addition, the STM already has eight hybrid buses acquired in 2008 as part of a pilot project to test the performance of this type of bus.

An articulated hybrid bus was also tested last year in preparation for its purchase in the coming years.

Electric buses


  • Dynamic recharging
  • Fast-charging electric buses

After the hybrid bus, the STM plans to make 100% electric buses its standard within the next few years .


Zero GHG emissions
Very quiet
Green (non-polluting) air conditioning

In the meantime, the first 12-metre bus, lent to us by the Chinese firm BYD, will be tested in Montréal in early 2014 to:


  • Assess its overall performance, particularly under winter conditions
  • Test its functioning

Dynamic recharging



The first line of electric buses using dynamic recharging technology, accessible to people with reduced mobility, could be operational in Montréal by 2017. These air conditioned vehicles will be propelled by 100% electric motors. Our objective: to create a network of some 100 vehicles on four of the most heavily travelled routes in the surface system.

Amazingly silent given its size, the 18-metre electric articulated bus can carry up to 150 passengers. It will be powered by overhead lines similar to those used by trolleybuses and thus enjoy almost unlimited autonomy. Several sections of the route will nevertheless be wireless and thus fully autonomous thanks to batteries that will recharge with no loss of time once the electric bus is connected.


Did you know:
Trolleybuses have been used for decades. They are still being used in some cities, such as Vancouver.
In the 1950s, Montréal had an impressive trolleybus system.
The largest trolleybus system in the world is found in Moscow, where the weather is similar to ours.
Modern trolleybus systems are still being developed, especially in Europe.

Fast-charging electric buses


According to STM experts, the future of the electric bus includes powerful, fast-charging batteries that will allow them to run more independently. In 2016, the STM will test this new system- known as "flash charging" - which is now in the research and development stage. Implementing this project in Montréal will allow us to test this new technology under local conditions.

A QUICK-CHARGING ELECTRIC BUS


The STM and Nova Bus, Volvo Group’s North American division, have entered into an agreement to carry out an electrification project for public transit: City Mobility. Thus, Montréal will become part of the City Mobility Program.

Quick-charging electric buses to undergo testing soon

The City Mobility project will see STM operate three pre-production, fully electric Nova Bus LFS buses for out-of-service testing by late 2015. In-service testing with passengers should begin in early 2016, allowing the STM to assess the new vehicle under actual operating conditions.

The autonomy of these buses will be increased thanks to a conductive quick-charge system, with a charging station at each end of a bus line. The station lowers itself to make direct contact with the bus for the purpose of recharging.

This project will serve to demonstrate the quick-charging system and assess the performance of the electric buses, in terms of reliability and energy-efficiency, in our weather conditions.

Remember:


  • Compared to cars, which are parked 95% of the time, buses are in service more than 80% of the time. Given the heavy weight of buses, meeting the challenge of electrification will rely on industry's ability to develop highly efficient and reliable technologies. According to our experts, a wireless 100% electric bus that meets our needs and performance standards will not be available before 2025 at the earliest.

  • For the STM, everything is in place to meet our electrification objectives. We can count on the current government of Quebec, for which this project is a priority, on Hydro-Québec, which has agreed to finance the necessary electric infrastructure, and on Quebec industry, which is also on board.

Electrification - even more benefits



  • Development of Quebec companies
  • Reduced dependence on oil
  • Use of clean (unpolluting) energy produced in Quebec

The plan to electrify Montréal's bus system is a big step in the right direction.
To implement this plan, requires money.

[video=youtube_share;aKx-WrdfzJY]http://youtu.be/aKx-WrdfzJY[/video]

Too bad Toronto is having a battle to get a new garage and more buses & streetcars.
 
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