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jn_12

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#4
Books are static and will obviously never be able to match a fluid internet if that's what you're looking for, but that book is only 3 years old, plus it's not like the historical elements are outdated. I enjoyed it anyways.
 

LAz

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#5
There has been no change in Toronto, but in much of the world there has been big change in those few years.
 

jn_12

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#6
ya of course. I'm just saying that there's a great deal of the book devoted to history, which unless new information is found doesn't really change. As I said, you can't compete with the internet if you're looking for the most up to date information, but if you're looking for an interesting read or at least want to gain an understanding of the featured systems up until that point in time then it's a good source.
 

wonderboy416

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#7
I navigate this every day:



My stop is Gangnam, the busiest single line station in Asia (over 140,000 passengers a day recently announced, that's also with it being just a 5 minute walk from another subway line that just opened). Thankfully another new line (several are being built right now) will open up in a years time reducing the crush of people on the line 2 trains.
There's also over 150 different bus connections at surface level, all with a frequency of less than 5 minutes and fares are typically $1 (fluctuates based on distance traveled, calculated automatically by the T-Money smart card). Sure makes me NOT miss the TTC.

It looks quite similar to Tokyo's, but I find it vastly superior in so many ways. When systems get this big different lines end up being operated by different companies which result in spats over smart cards, day passes and transfer zones among other things... In Seoul all the lines must play together fairly resulting in a seamless customer experience, in Tokyo they're practically at war with each other.
 
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LAz

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#8
I navigate this every day:
Lucky...

But Seoul's problem remains that there are like 80 er so independent bus route companies. They need to put them all together. The subway expansion hurt the bus usage, overall in the last 30 years. But more oughta be done to reduce the number of these operators.


ya of course. I'm just saying that there's a great deal of the book devoted to history, which unless new information is found doesn't really change. As I said, you can't compete with the internet if you're looking for the most up to date information, but if you're looking for an interesting read or at least want to gain an understanding of the featured systems up until that point in time then it's a good source.
Hm, okay I guess. But their history is selective. As one goes through the book one gets less and less history.

It's the asian systems that have boomed these last few years... so that is what makes the main difference today, along with some stuff here and there like vancouver's line, caracas... :/
 

wonderboy416

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#9
Lucky...

But Seoul's problem remains that there are like 80 er so independent bus route companies. They need to put them all together. The subway expansion hurt the bus usage, overall in the last 30 years. But more oughta be done to reduce the number of these operators.
The various bus-line operators doesn't have much (if any) impact on the end-user. City transit buses all follow the same system (small green or yellow bus for local service, large green bus for across the dong (neighbhorhood), blue bus for across Seoul and red bus for the suburbs. The smart card will allow you to transfer from one to another (and the subway and commuter rail lines) without hassle. Then there's the bus terminals where buses that travel all across the country are deployed (and as you mention, each one seems to have a different operator) BUT... the user sees no difference and fares across the country are very reasonable (about $15 to just about anywhere) or you can always take the high speed train. The use of bus-lanes in the city itself and the fact that every single bus starts and ends at a subway station makes taking the bus a better alternative than the subway at times. If I wanted to go from my home to Gimpo airport (domestic flights + Japan) I could choose between 4 different buses (all about a $5 fare), or take an express subway train all from where I live. The user is the winner. In Toronto I'm sure it would be made sure that competing transit options would be limited rather than encouraged.
 

LAz

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#10
The problem comes when different companies run buses along the same route. If there were fewer bus companies things could be much more efficient. At least I would think so. But, since the war over there the bus routes have been given to certain "ruling class" interests, as rewards or something. So that's the result of undemocratic processes... a worse product instead of a better one.

But, the metro offsets that, which is the important thing. The even better thing is that the metro has hurt the bus companies - because expansion was so fast it made some buses redundant, and reduced bus ridership. :D