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Planned Sprawl in the GTA

innsertnamehere

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through a discussion on SSP, I decided to create a map of planned sprawl areas around the GTA. I included existing and planned highway networks as well, to show the correlation between the two.

Blue outline = existing urban areas
yellow = planned urban areas
red = highways, planned and existing.




A couple of notes:

The only official plan for any suburban municipality not to include urban expansion lands (sprawl) was Oakville, as far as I can tell.

Clarington has huge population growth plans between the growth of Bowmanville and Courtice.

Durham is going to get a much, much larger urban area with the opening of the 407 extension.

Northern York Region has some big growth incoming, especially around the 404 extension. one of two entirely new towns will be built up there, Queensville. (the other is Seaton in North Pickering)

Bradford has built most of it's planned sprawl already and is still waiting for its highway to support it. (Bradford bypass)

Barrie is completely built out and recently annexed part of Innisfil to find some land for suburban growth to the south.

Stouffville is approaching full buildout, it'll probably peak at around 40-50,000 people in the town, with full buildout probably around 2020.

Milton is planning to use much, much less land that it has been given by the province, though it is still sprawling significantly.

Brampton has literally it's entire municipality zoned for sprawl other than the small stretch of greenbelt that drops down into it.
 

James

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^ I think it will...and many who live in Durham or are planning to move into Durham believe so too. I predict north Pickering is going to be a nice little hub once it develops.
 

innsertnamehere

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The question is really how much commercial will actually develop along the 407, the tolls are a real deterrent to truck traffic.

Updated to include Oakville Northern expansion area, which I somehow missed. I added Hamilton as wel. I didn't do Guelph, though its urban area boundary has been drawn out.

 

denfromoakvillemilton

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^ I think it will...and many who live in Durham or are planning to move into Durham believe so too. I predict north Pickering is going to be a nice little hub once it develops.
So there will be no chance of people breaking into the housing market once places like Pickering, Ajax and Whitby get expensive.
 

howl

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TJ O'Pootertoot

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through a discussion on SSP, I decided to create a map of planned sprawl areas around the GTA. I included existing and planned highway networks as well, to show the correlation between the two.

Blue outline = existing urban areas
yellow = planned urban areas
red = highways, planned and existing.




A couple of notes:

The only official plan for any suburban municipality not to include urban expansion lands (sprawl) was Oakville, as far as I can tell.

...

Northern York Region has some big growth incoming, especially around the 404 extension. one of two entirely new towns will be built up there, Queensville. (the other is Seaton in North Pickering)
I'd check that. If we're talking about municipalities that opened up expansion lands after Places to Grow, only 3 munis in York Region (Vaughan, Markham and East Gwillimbury) did so. Even if you add in whitebelt lands, I don't think any other York Region municipality but for those 3 has any left.

And at the risk of getting into semantics, I don't think any new development is necessarily "sprawl," though obviously when your building something on the periphery, there's a good chance it's heading that way.

Nice map, though!
 

denfromoakvillemilton

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The question is really how much commercial will actually develop along the 407, the tolls are a real deterrent to truck traffic.

Updated to include Oakville Northern expansion area, which I somehow missed. I added Hamilton as wel. I didn't do Guelph, though its urban area boundary has been drawn out.

aurora, Richmond hill, and Newmarket have current farm fields that are zoned for industrial or residential use.
I'm shocked to hear there are still farms in RH. I think tolls will slow growth in general up there but we'll see.
 

canarob

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The question is really how much commercial will actually develop along the 407, the tolls are a real deterrent to truck traffic
I think significant commercial development along the 407 in Durham is highly dependent on the Pickering Airport moving forward, even if it's just a general aviation and cargo airport at first. Otherwise, I would assume the lands in Eastern Markham would get developed first, unless we are talking about some kind of large-scale development that requires a huge amount of land.
 

James

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The question is really how much commercial will actually develop along the 407, the tolls are a real deterrent to truck traffic.

...
I believe that commercial and retail will still develop despite the toll roads. Perhaps we may not get as much manufacturing and assembly plants requiring the frequent importing and exporting of goods and materials. Given the changing landscape of businesses in North America, i.e. shrinking manufacturing sector and increasing service sector, I can envision healthy commercial in these corridors where businesses will be focused on consulting, public service, or high-tech.
 

TOareaFan

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If you look along the 407 you see a lot of distribution and cold storage facilities....this just shows you that the "cost of congestion" calculations are somewhat accurate. Faced with quick access at the cost of tolls....or delayed access due to congestion...the market is voting for the former.
 

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