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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

WislaHD

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On the Yonge Line, Glencairn/Blythwood would be good for the sake of nearby development, while Teddington Park has the edge for connectivity (the 103 and 74A buses end 200 meters away). On the Sheppard West extension, the levy could be used for infill stations at Senlac, Faywood, and the Downsview Airport site.

It could even be used on Don Mills to help pay for the North extension.
There was supposed to be a stop at Glencairn however it and a stop at Glen Echo were canned due to budget reasons. Glen Echo actually got the double whammy of being cut for budget reasons and being impossible to build after it was decided York Mills would be underground.
NIMBYs would be out for blood regarding any development around Glencairn. We haven't even been able to successfully redevelop around Lawrence Station. I suppose though if there was a societal shift of opinion, it would be a great way to induce some infill development near the core of the mega-city.

The other problem with Glencairn/Blythwood is that the extra stop will delay every other rider on the Yonge Line heading southbound, and the cumulative lost time for all those commuters far out-weighs the benefits of a Glencairn/Blythwood stop. It would also be a low-ridership stop, since even with wide-scale infill redevelopment of the area, walk-in traffic is never too high, and there are a lack of connecting feeder bus routes.
 

Steve X

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There was supposed to be a stop at Glencairn however it and a stop at Glen Echo were canned due to budget reasons. Glen Echo actually got the double whammy of being cut for budget reasons and being impossible to build after it was decided York Mills would be underground.
It's just going to be another Bessarion Station. Summerhill and Rosedale are pretty low ridership station. Glen Echo would be worst. Even Lawrence is pretty low and mainly gets it's riders from the 52 and 124 serving York U and Sunnybrook Hospital. Most of the riders on the 52 comes east of Bathurst as 90% of the riders west of the Spadina Line would choose to transfer at Lawrence West or get off by Bathurst Street. At 22k daily ridership, it makes it one of the worst major intersection station on the Yonge Line (north of Union) with frequent bus service feeding the station. There is no hope for Glen Echo with no feeder bus in this area.
 

M II A II R II K

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It doesn’t matter about large GO trains of people crowding onto smaller Ontario line trains. After all the Canada Line carries more people than the entire Lakeshore East line in a day. And less than a third of the people would be transferring at those stations not including those who are disembarking at 5hose stations and not transferrring.
 

robmausser

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NIMBYs would be out for blood regarding any development around Glencairn. We haven't even been able to successfully redevelop around Lawrence Station. I suppose though if there was a societal shift of opinion, it would be a great way to induce some infill development near the core of the mega-city.

The other problem with Glencairn/Blythwood is that the extra stop will delay every other rider on the Yonge Line heading southbound, and the cumulative lost time for all those commuters far out-weighs the benefits of a Glencairn/Blythwood stop. It would also be a low-ridership stop, since even with wide-scale infill redevelopment of the area, walk-in traffic is never too high, and there are a lack of connecting feeder bus routes.
I live at Glencairn/Blythwood, and the NIMBYS WERE out for blood, even in the 1970s when a station was proposed in this area. The residents here voted against the station, and thats a big reason why it wasn't built.
 

Northern Light

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The Star's Ben Spurr out w/Ontario Line updates.


Highlights from the article:

RFQs are back, and province will hold presser to say so.

Line won't be finished by 2027 (editorial: duh!); no alternate date provided.

Contracts for construction/vehicles to be broken up.

Contract 1: 30-year contract to design, supply, operate and maintain the vehicles, track, communications, and train control systems for the entire line

(editorial: this mean M/L must predetermine vehicle length, as station design is dependent on this, also seems to leave TTC operation role unclear)

Contract 2: designing, building, and financing the southern portion of the Ontario Line, from Exhibition Place to the Don Yard west of the Don River, including seven stations and a six-kilometre tunnel.

Contract 3: the northern portion of the line, from Gerrard to the Ontario Science Centre, including seven stations, a three-kilometre tunnel, and associated bridges and elevated guideways.

Contract 4: Segments of the Ontario Line that run through GO corridors

(editorial, I don't see any contract associated with Maintenance and Storage Facility; no location for which has yet been publicly identified, another build whose details are also determined by vehicle size, and number. No specificity
on whether the GO corridor work is tunneled or above grade or elevated, and no mention of rail embankments or land procurement, which hasn't happened yet, unless it has been willing buyer/seller and hidden from the public)


I am genuinely concerned that they plan to move ahead with a project that hasn't even received a cursory public vetting and which has many shortcomings.
 

Edward Skira

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News Release
Ontario Moves Forward with Signature Subway Project
June 2, 2020
Ontario Line will help reduce congestion, drive economic growth and job creation
TORONTO - Today, Caroline Mulroney, Minister of Transportation, and Kinga Surma, Associate Minister of Transportation (GTA), announced the Ontario government is moving forward with the next step in building the Ontario Line, the signature project in the largest subway expansion in the province's history. The government is issuing the first two public-private partnership (P3) Requests for Qualifications (RFQs) to identify and qualify those who will design, build and maintain the subway line. The Ontario Line is being built under three separate P3 contracts.
"Under the leadership of Premier Ford, our government is taking historic steps to expand subway service and reduce traffic congestion across the GTA," said Minister Mulroney. "By issuing these first RFQs we are one step closer to realizing our transit vision and helping to generate economic activity and create tens of thousands of jobs as the province recovers from COVID-19."
The 15.5 kilometre Ontario Line will extend from Exhibition/Ontario Place to the Ontario Science Centre. Current plans include 15 potential stations, including 17 new multi-modal connections to GO Transit, existing TTC subway stations and streetcar lines, and the Eglinton Crosstown Light Rail Transit line.
These first two RFQs being issued will include rolling stock systems, an operations and maintenance contract for the entire line and a design-build-finance contract for the southern portion of the Ontario Line. The RFQ for the northern civil package will be released once the successful proponent for the southern civil package is identified.
"Investments in infrastructure projects, like the Ontario Line, will be essential for getting people back to work and improving the quality of life for people throughout the GTA," said Kinga Surma, Associate Minister of Transportation (GTA). "To build projects of this magnitude, however, we need everyone at the table. We are calling on the federal government to commit to paying their fair share, at least 40 per cent of the four nationally-significant subway projects."
Companies interested in bidding on these contracts must register with www.merx.com to download the respective RFQs. Infrastructure Ontario and Metrolinx will evaluate RFQ submissions and shortlist teams to be invited to respond to a Request for Proposals in fall 2020.
"The Ontario Line is one of the most significant transit infrastructure projects for Ontario in a generation," said Laurie Scott, Minister of Infrastructure. "Moving forward with these procurement contracts signals the government remains committed to building much needed transit infrastructure to reduce congestion and contribute to the economic recovery and renewal of our province."
In April 2019, the province announced its historic new transportation vision, with a preliminary estimated cost of $28.5 billion. This includes four priority transit projects: the all-new Ontario Line; a three-stop Scarborough Subway Extension; the Yonge North Subway Extension; and the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension.
QUICK FACTS
  • In addition to the three P3 contracts, some segments of the Ontario Line, where the alignment joins GO Transit rail corridors, will be procured separately. Work on these sections is expected to start before construction commences on the three major work packages.
  • The TTC will be responsible for day to day operations, including in respect of labour relations. Maintenance that the project company could be responsible for includes re-establishing Ontario Line operations, restoring power, coordinating with utility companies or others depending on the source of failure to restore operations.
  • On February 18, Minister Mulroney introduced the Building Transit Faster Act, which, if passed, would provide the province with the tools to expedite the planning, design and construction process of the four priority transit projects.
 

W. K. Lis

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News Release
Ontario Moves Forward with Signature Subway Project
June 2, 2020
Ontario Line will help reduce congestion, drive economic growth and job creation
TORONTO - Today, Caroline Mulroney, Minister of Transportation, and Kinga Surma, Associate Minister of Transportation (GTA), announced the Ontario government is moving forward with the next step in building the Ontario Line, the signature project in the largest subway expansion in the province's history. The government is issuing the first two public-private partnership (P3) Requests for Qualifications (RFQs) to identify and qualify those who will design, build and maintain the subway line. The Ontario Line is being built under three separate P3 contracts.
"Under the leadership of Premier Ford, our government is taking historic steps to expand subway service and reduce traffic congestion across the GTA," said Minister Mulroney. "By issuing these first RFQs we are one step closer to realizing our transit vision and helping to generate economic activity and create tens of thousands of jobs as the province recovers from COVID-19."
The 15.5 kilometre Ontario Line will extend from Exhibition/Ontario Place to the Ontario Science Centre. Current plans include 15 potential stations, including 17 new multi-modal connections to GO Transit, existing TTC subway stations and streetcar lines, and the Eglinton Crosstown Light Rail Transit line.
These first two RFQs being issued will include rolling stock systems, an operations and maintenance contract for the entire line and a design-build-finance contract for the southern portion of the Ontario Line. The RFQ for the northern civil package will be released once the successful proponent for the southern civil package is identified.
"Investments in infrastructure projects, like the Ontario Line, will be essential for getting people back to work and improving the quality of life for people throughout the GTA," said Kinga Surma, Associate Minister of Transportation (GTA). "To build projects of this magnitude, however, we need everyone at the table. We are calling on the federal government to commit to paying their fair share, at least 40 per cent of the four nationally-significant subway projects."
Companies interested in bidding on these contracts must register with www.merx.com to download the respective RFQs. Infrastructure Ontario and Metrolinx will evaluate RFQ submissions and shortlist teams to be invited to respond to a Request for Proposals in fall 2020.
"The Ontario Line is one of the most significant transit infrastructure projects for Ontario in a generation," said Laurie Scott, Minister of Infrastructure. "Moving forward with these procurement contracts signals the government remains committed to building much needed transit infrastructure to reduce congestion and contribute to the economic recovery and renewal of our province."
In April 2019, the province announced its historic new transportation vision, with a preliminary estimated cost of $28.5 billion. This includes four priority transit projects: the all-new Ontario Line; a three-stop Scarborough Subway Extension; the Yonge North Subway Extension; and the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension.

QUICK FACTS
  • In addition to the three P3 contracts, some segments of the Ontario Line, where the alignment joins GO Transit rail corridors, will be procured separately. Work on these sections is expected to start before construction commences on the three major work packages.
  • The TTC will be responsible for day to day operations, including in respect of labour relations. Maintenance that the project company could be responsible for includes re-establishing Ontario Line operations, restoring power, coordinating with utility companies or others depending on the source of failure to restore operations.
  • On February 18, Minister Mulroney introduced the Building Transit Faster Act, which, if passed, would provide the province with the tools to expedite the planning, design and construction process of the four priority transit projects.

Delayed because they ran out of napkins (COVID-19 this time).


From link.
 

Coolstar

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Unsurprised yet disappointed the line is delayed. I think 2030-2031 seems more like a realistic date for this line. If so we'll may see all 4 of Ford's projects open at the same time.
 

Rainforest

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Dividing the work into multiple contracts probably makes sense. Did they divide wisely though?

A silly question; can we end up in a situation where Contracts 2 and 3: Exhibition to the Don Yard and Gerrard to the Science Centre, are signed off / paid for / under construction, and then it is discovered that the connecting section with the bridge over Don and the East Harbor station cannot be built as planned?
 

Rainforest

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I don't see any contract associated with Maintenance and Storage Facility; no location for which has yet been publicly identified, another build whose details are also determined by vehicle size, and number.
Perhaps that's a part of Contract 1? Whoever commits to maintain the vehicles, should be in control of the Maintenance Facility.
 

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