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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

TheTigerMaster

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It’ll be interesting to see how the City’s control of funds will impact the proposals brought forward. If Metrolinx controlled all the funds, Queen’s Park and their private sector partners would’ve gotten away with saddling Torotonians with an underbuilt and ineffective proposal. That’s now going to be impossible with Toronto controlling access to Federal funds. I expect we’re going to see higher costs and perhaps a dramatically different route as a result
 

W. K. Lis

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When the original Yonge Street Subway opened in 1954, they had expected that two-car Gloucester car trains would be used in the off-peak or Sunday service. Didn't turn out that way, they used four-car at minimum. Eventually settling with six-car and eight-car Gloucester trains.

From link.
 

TheTigerMaster

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When the original Yonge Street Subway opened in 1954, they had expected that two-car Gloucester car trains would be used in the off-peak or Sunday service. Didn't turn out that way, they used four-car at minimum. Eventually settling with six-car and eight-car Gloucester trains.

From link.
Fun fact: In 1954 they also thought they could run the Yonge Line at 90 second headways. Thankfully they weren’t foolish enough to bet the future of the city on that delusion
 

unicornsample

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Noticed these markings on Carlaw today. They run from Queen to approximately Dundas. Almost looks like the outline of a subway alignment... Would someone more knowledgable than me care to dash my optimism? Thanks.

IMG_3342.jpg
 

vic

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I believe those are markings of power lines/gas lines to prevent damage if digging up the road for any work required. Not sure if this is relevant (see link) but red is electrical. My guess is this is where the TTC electrical lines are. https://www.alliancepipeline.com/SafetyEnvironment/Safety/Documents/UniformColorCodes.pdf
Here's the similar chart on the City of Toronto website:

Yes, red = electrical.
 

smallspy

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I believe those are markings of power lines/gas lines to prevent damage if digging up the road for any work required. Not sure if this is relevant (see link) but red is electrical. My guess is this is where the TTC electrical lines are. https://www.alliancepipeline.com/SafetyEnvironment/Safety/Documents/UniformColorCodes.pdf
Indeed, there are a bunch of locations around the City where the TTC has strung (or undergrounded) power wires from one line to another. When aboveground, they can be easily made out as they use the TTC-standard steel poles rather than Toronto Hydro's.

I didn't know about any on Carlaw per se, but it stands to reason that there could be some around there considering that there is a substation at Queen and Greenwood.

Dan
 

W. K. Lis

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New York City has different trains on its subway network. The most obvious difference is some subway cars are 3.05 m wide, while others are 2.67 m. Which means they cannot use the same trains on all the lines.

Different subway car lengths as well.

See link.
 

Streety McCarface

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New York City has different trains on its subway network. The most obvious difference is some subway cars are 3.05 m wide, while others are 2.67 m. Which means they cannot use the same trains on all the lines.

Different subway car lengths as well.

See link.
Those different sizes are a result of different companies building the lines. Nowadays, they try to build all new lines (not extensions) to the BMT/IND specifications. There is absolutely no reason we should be changing sizes here.
 

44 North

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I think there's merit to different sizes (narrower, more articulation points, more of a modern signalling system if that does exist). Things gotta do some tight wiggling in a built environment, which a different train may be better at. But definitely equal - or longer - in overall train length to what we have now.
 

Streety McCarface

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I think there's merit to different sizes (narrower, more articulation points, more of a modern signalling system if that does exist). Things gotta do some tight wiggling in a built environment, which a different train may be better at. But definitely equal - or longer - in overall train length to what we have now.
But how many technologies must we have? No one wants to be SEPTA, who has to run 6 different train types to run their system. We're already at 5, do we really need a 6th?
 

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