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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

Leo_Chan

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Look what I've found by a simple URL manipulation:


This map doesn't look very aesthetically pleasing and the stations labeled don't have clear reasoning. It appears that it shows all the interchange and terminal stations in the existing TTC subway stations and stations that interchange (or will) with GO Trains and buses. However, missing are Yorkdale, York Mills, Eglinton West/Cedarvale, UNION, and for some reason Finch West (LRT?) is on here. I'm confused, can anyone explain?
 

Coolstar

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This map doesn't look very aesthetically pleasing and the stations labeled don't have clear reasoning. It appears that it shows all the interchange and terminal stations in the existing TTC subway stations and stations that interchange (or will) with GO Trains and buses. However, missing are Yorkdale, York Mills, Eglinton West/Cedarvale, UNION, and for some reason Finch West (LRT?) is on here. I'm confused, can anyone explain?
Finch West interchanges with the LRT and Union is on there.
 

asher__jo

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I'll give the benefit of the doubt the station names are preliminary, but what the hell? Metrolinx is very selective about applying their naming convention evenly (ex. Jane and Finch on Finch W LRT, all the above stations that have /)
 

Isotack

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This map doesn't look very aesthetically pleasing and the stations labeled don't have clear reasoning. It appears that it shows all the interchange and terminal stations in the existing TTC subway stations and stations that interchange (or will) with GO Trains and buses. However, missing are Yorkdale, York Mills, Eglinton West/Cedarvale, UNION, and for some reason Finch West (LRT?) is on here. I'm confused, can anyone explain?
They are getting rid of all those stations...it was on here a few pages back
 

Neutrino

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That map also includes some kind of two stop SSE
 

TheTigerMaster

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Look what I've found by a simple URL manipulation:


I see the graphic design department has had their budget slashed to zero
 

Leo_Chan

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That map also includes some kind of two stop SSE
Well, if you go by the logic I proposed in my previous post, then it doesn’t mean anything since Lawrence East and Brimley/Eglinton do not have any GO Transit connections and are not terminal stations, so they’re not labeled on the map.
 

TossYourJacket

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That has to be the ugliest/dumbest transit map I've ever seen. They couldn't even line the two labelled Spadina stations up correctly. Also, the fact they included the SSE but not the Crosstown is hilarious and bizarre.
 

amnesiajune

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Given that many systems use a solid cantenary in tunnels now (i.e. a rail on the ceiling) I'd think the bore difference isn't a huge cost difference. Especially if they go single bore
Single bore and smaller trains. Toronto has absurdly wide subway trains, which is definitely a big driver of the high cost of subway expansions here. Most cities in Europe use smaller and much shorter trains, single bore tunnels and side platforms (not to mention that their stations aren't as grand as ours).
 

Kyle Campbell

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Single bore and smaller trains. Toronto has absurdly wide subway trains, which is definitely a big driver of the high cost of subway expansions here. Most cities in Europe use smaller and much shorter trains, single bore tunnels and side platforms (not to mention that their stations aren't as grand as ours).
I wouldn't necessarily say their stations aren't as grand, other than the overly grandiose ones on the Vaughn extension I'd say a lot of the stations I've seen in Europe in Rome, Istanbul, Oslo, and Amsterdam are more grand or at least equivalent to Toronto's. However, a 2.6 m wide train does generally seem to be much more common throughout the world then a 3.2 one.
 

muller877

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I like our wider subway trains. The extra capacity works well too since we build them so infrequently. ;)
But is slows the trains down (longer boarding times). If you have narrower trains you can move them more frequently (and faster) along the line
 

Streety McCarface

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Does it? How does dwell time compare between Montreal and Toronto?
They're about the same, but not on the Azurs. Door numbers and size of entrance are better indicators of dwell times, width actually helps but not significantly. If there's a greater width in the train, there's more room for people to enter at a particular point, as opposed to space running out and people having to rush to other doors, however, this is generally not significant since trains in both cities barely ever go from completely empty to crush loads in regular operations.

Dwell times on the older rolling stock was better than Toronto's because they had 4 doors per 17-meter car (compared to the 4 doors on a 23-meter car (it was worse for the H-Series because those doors were so narrow)), and because doors opened before the train fully stopped. On the rockets, the trains sit there for 1-2 seconds while the door interlocking system (which I don't believe is an interlocking system but rather a computer) ensures that the train is completely stopped before releasing door operations to the guard.
 

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