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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

WislaHD

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I was going through the BCA document for the Relief Line and noticed a number I did not see before:

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The Relief Line is expected to reduce congestion on the Queen and King Streetcars by 69% and 74% heading westbound at rush hour!

Nice to finally have numbers to place next to that point.
 

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Palma

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Then who should be then? If you don't a personal stake in what is being built then why is your opinion any more relevant than those of local stakeholders - like those at serious risk of mass expropriation if Pape alignment south of Gerrard is chosen over Carlaw.
I think TTC should decide as they run the system and know the heavy routes, I do not know the area that well but why would Councillor McMahon not want it along carlaw vs pape
 

Palma

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Worth the delay to avoid an asinine stop location. Seriously where is more suited to a subway stop:



or


?

Where can't be so anxious to get a DRL under construction that we throw common sense out the window in the process.
So is photo #1 pape and photo #2 carlaw
 

Rainforest

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I'm wondering how many of the "NIMBYs" will actually hold onto their homes or sell them to developers (at a good price) for new commercial and/or residential high-rise buildings?
I guess the problem is that developers can choose which parsel of land to assemble. If one homeowner would not cell at any price, they can buy another lot and still build their highrise, as long as the zoning rules allow that.

For a subway station, there is much less flexibility because it has to be on the route, straight, horizontal, have space for exits and meet a few more additional requirements.
 

Rainforest

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Of course, if the housing market crashes after they refuse to sell, and then they expropriate, it'll be "market value" at the time.
It is unlikely that areas around the DRL route will see a major drop in house prices, even if the general market crashes. During the U.S. 2008 crash, average prices in New York dropped by 17% only. Sure Toronto isn't New York, but the point is that in high-demand areas, any price correction will be limited.
 

Palma

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I guess the problem is that developers can choose which parsel of land to assemble. If one homeowner would not cell at any price, they can buy another lot and still build their highrise, as long as the zoning rules allow that.

For a subway station, there is much less flexibility because it has to be on the route, straight, horizontal, have space for exits and meet a few more additional requirements.
thats the problem when you have houses on a major street. At some point, traffic increases, and the street re-develops. Sheppard between Dufferin and bathurst, once homes and some still there but not for much longer. The same on sections of Bayview, St Clair. Lots of major streets still have houses. keele St from south of the 401, Finch Ave, Lawrence Ave, etc. I guess at once point in time, sleepy neighbourhoods before advent of the car. But when those lanes are opened up and you now live on a street with 2 lanes in each direction, its only a matter of time before the houses are bought and turned into condos or commercial buildings
 

WislaHD

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It is unlikely that areas around the DRL route will see a major drop in house prices, even if the general market crashes. During the U.S. 2008 crash, average prices in New York dropped by 17% only. Sure Toronto isn't New York, but the point is that in high-demand areas, any price correction will be limited.
More to the point, I think our zoning bylaws pretty much prevent a serious price correction from taking place in our inner city neighbourhoods.
 

TransitBart

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Expropriation. Everyone here seems to know what that means.

Note 1: Why the hell is everyone talking about it? I attended two of the recent DRL town halls and the Pape Av residents were going on and on about it. No one has suggested that this would be necessary.

Note 2: If anyone has owned property in cottage country, then you may have come across markers on your land. As it turns out, you bought the surface of the land. Not the ground water and not the mineral rights underneath. It's common for property owners to have mines dug and things extracted from under their land. Why the hell hasn't anyone pointed this out to a resident of Pape Av?

Note 3: Given 1 and 2, why hasn't anyone on the planning team taken the time to communicated in a clear and careful manner what might be necessary?

Summary - instead of communicating in a way to minimize concern and downright fear, the communication is leaving plenty open to interpretation which is not helping.
 

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