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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

sche

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You seemed to contradict yourself in the Crosstown LRT thread:

"This is the problem, just because the density decreases doesn't mean the speed and quality should decrease - quite the opposite - the low density areas are where you should have less stops so you can actually go fast and get to . . . the *dense* places. Nonetheless, both ends of our lovely surface tramway will be anchored with subway and / or regional rail interchanges - by making the connection between them slow a whole bunch of trips that people could have made (reducing travel time and improving their lives) won't be nearly as attractive. It's also really a lowest common denominator thing, this one section is going to drag on the whole line. That is the problem."

Speed, quality and (and in this case capacity) should not decrease here either.
1. Capacity: The original post didn't even mention capacity. This is just putting words in others' mouths. The only things that should dictate capacity are demand and cost.
2. Speed: Please explain how a grade separated, above ground train is slower than a grade separated tunneled train. Is the Allen Rd section of YUS slower than the rest?
3. Quality: Again, please explain how a grade separated, above ground train is "lower quality" than an underground train.
 

syn

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1. Capacity: The original post didn't even mention capacity. This is just putting words in others' mouths. The only things that should dictate capacity are demand and cost.
2. Speed: Please explain how a grade separated, above ground train is slower than a grade separated tunneled train. Is the Allen Rd section of YUS slower than the rest?
3. Quality: Again, please explain how a grade separated, above ground train is "lower quality" than an underground train.

The point was that the same thing that are cited as benefits for the Ontario Line are being completely ignored for the Crosstown.

"Capacity: The original post didn't even mention capacity. This is just putting words in others' mouths. The only things that should dictate capacity are demand and cost."

That's the point. How can you claim it's worth the cost savings while ignoring such a significant factor? In contrast he claims the Crosstown LRT will be over capacity from day 1, and cost saving seem to be a non-factor.
 

sche

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The point was that the same thing that are cited as benefits for the Ontario Line are being completely ignored for the Crosstown.

"Capacity: The original post didn't even mention capacity. This is just putting words in others' mouths. The only things that should dictate capacity are demand and cost."

That's the point. How can you claim it's worth the cost savings while ignoring such a significant factor? In contrast he claims the Crosstown LRT will be over capacity from day 1, and cost saving seem to be a non-factor.
Again, completely twisting others' words.

How can you claim it's worth the cost savings while ignoring such a significant factor?
I didn't even make such a claim in that post???

In contrast he claims the Crosstown LRT will be over capacity from day 1, and cost saving seem to be a non-factor.
Literally *nobody* is claiming that ECLRT will be over capacity on day 1.
 

officedweller

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At the very least, Toronto should recycle the trees into furniture, flooring, or paper cheques to the developers.

Recycling for furniture or other woodworking sometimes happens in Vancouver.
... and in this case, the community seems attached to the trees, so it would be a goodwill gesture to donate the wood.
 

officedweller

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I watched the Ontario Line Town Hall that just finished and one thing that caught my attention was Malcoms comment saying "The 3 contracts are going to run for around 9+ years". Did I hear that right?
Hopefully that incudes some commissioning time, warranty follow-up and maybe even initial operations and handover.
 

W. K. Lis

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This image is from behind Iqbal Halal Foods, at Thorncliffe Pk Dr..
1638049669454.png

From link.

The powers-that-be don't want to use the hydro corridor because of the possible problems with stray electrical charges from the overhead hydro lines.

Has anyone looked into using a Faraday cage surrounding the rail vehicle yard? A Faraday cage or Faraday shield is an enclosure used to block electromagnetic fields. A Faraday shield may be formed by a continuous covering of conductive material, or in the case of a Faraday cage, by a mesh of such materials. Faraday cages are named after scientist Michael Faraday, who invented them in 1836.

faraday-cage-emf-protection-465x400.jpg.webp
From link.

Would the people opposed to the current proposed rail yard location help in paying for the cage and locating it under the hydro lines?
 

BB ON

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The problem isn't stray EM fields. It's maintenance access and liability for Hydro One, so they don't allow it.
 

syn

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Again, completely twisting others' words.

How can you claim it's worth the cost savings while ignoring such a significant factor?
I didn't even make such a claim in that post???

In contrast he claims the Crosstown LRT will be over capacity from day 1, and cost saving seem to be a non-factor.
Literally *nobody* is claiming that ECLRT will be over capacity on day 1.

 

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