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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

11th

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Latest Metrolinx blog post on the Ontario Line. Includes station footprint maps for Exhibition, King/Bathurst, and Queen/Spadina.


View attachment 326719

View attachment 326718
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The Exhibition station building looks way bigger than just a bridge. If they are smart, they'd make that the concourse with shops, sort of like what they do at some Asian stations; maybe add a roof top park while at it.
 

officedweller

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Is that transit corridor meant to encourage densification in the blue areas?

No, it's just impacted areas during construction - so basically it's where there will be road closures and work areas
(so they don't want people doing work/wanting access over those areas).
That's why the radii don't meet in people's backyards - it's focussed on the roads.
 

superelevation

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The "MYTH" seems a lot more sensible.

I wonder why they can't just provide some more concrete plans to the community to assuage their fears. The use of vague language isn't helping.
Ah yes, Metrolinx bulldozing a park in a neighborhood already screaming about a new electric transit service seems sensible . . .
 

Steve Munro

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Ah yes, Metrolinx bulldozing a park in a neighborhood already screaming about a new electric transit service seems sensible . . .
Metrolinx has sent many conflicting signals about property that will be affected as opposed to "taken". They are evasive about land they might occupy (having to tear down the current trees, etc) in order to build on their corridor. When they show finished versions of the line these do not reveal what will occur for construction. There was a recent event at Small's Creek (east of the OL territory) where a crew came in at midnight to cut down trees in an area they had previously said would be protected. They wanted it for an access road to the corridor. It turned out that this was for a separate contract (new signalling cable) that the project team assuring the residents all was safe didn't know about. It is fairly common to discover that spokespeople for Metrolinx do not know all of what the organization is up to. They might have the best of intentions, but it is precisely this type of event that makes any "promise" or "plan" Metrolinx might produce utterly untrustworthy.

On the subject of electric service, when the total number of trains is planned to go up by a factor of 9x and the combined headway will be <60 seconds all day between GO and OL operations, people have every reason to distrust Mlx who have still not published any noise projections for the area in question. "Trust us, it will be quieter" rings hollow.

The compound effect of the evasions, the lack of detailed plans, and what I will generously call "staff who don't know what they are talking about" undermines Metrolinx' credibility on any issue.
 

generalcanada

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so dumb question here but why couldnt they use the millwood bridge and viaduct like they did with the bloor street/prince edward viaduct?

Does it not support trains running below it?
 

ARG1

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so dumb question here but why couldnt they use the millwood bridge and viaduct like they did with the bloor street/prince edward viaduct?

Does it not support trains running below it?
Pretty much. The Prince Edward Viaduct was specifically built to support a subway under it, 50 years before BD was built (the concept of foresight existed back then). The leaside bridge was not.
 

smallspy

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so dumb question here but why couldnt they use the millwood bridge and viaduct like they did with the bloor street/prince edward viaduct?

Does it not support trains running below it?
The Millwood Bridge was built with a plan to build streetcar tracks down the middle of it, in the middle of the road.

It was also built as a 4 lane bridge, and was widened later in its life. There seems to be some confusion/dissension as to whether it is still capable of handling streetcars today.

But to put anything underneath the road deck? That's not possible without some very, very major rebuilding, and the piers may not be strong enough to handle the additional weight in any case.

Dan
 

generalcanada

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Pretty much. The Prince Edward Viaduct was specifically built to support a subway under it, 50 years before BD was built (the concept of foresight existed back then). The leaside bridge was not.

The Millwood Bridge was built with a plan to build streetcar tracks down the middle of it, in the middle of the road.

It was also built as a 4 lane bridge, and was widened later in its life. There seems to be some confusion/dissension as to whether it is still capable of handling streetcars today.

But to put anything underneath the road deck? That's not possible without some very, very major rebuilding, and the piers may not be strong enough to handle the additional weight in any case.

Dan
thanks
 

W. K. Lis

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Even with an untrained eye, the Prince Edward Viaduct even LOOKS robust when the Leaside Bridge, formerly the East York Leaside Viaduct, and officially commemorated as the Confederation Bridge LOOKS fragile in comparison. Looks like they wanted to save money, but will now cost us in having to build a separate bridge.
 

syn

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Ah yes, Metrolinx bulldozing a park in a neighborhood already screaming about a new electric transit service seems sensible . . .

I was referring to the layout in the most general sense.

It really points to the poor planning behind this project. The most sensible approach is not possible due to space constraints and their commitment to the community (which as @Steve Munro pointed out, is dubious at best).
 

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