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Ontario Line (was Relief Line South, in Design)

generalcanada

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Was this confirmed before or is this the first official word on this?

Platform edge doors on all stations?
Capture.PNG
 

ARG1

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slapped_chicken

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I'd be super surprised if they don't install platform screen doors. Having platform screen doors is one capacity-enhancing component in lieu of using slightly lower capacity trains. After all, we should try and squeeze as much capacity out of this line as possible.

They would allow trains to enter stations at a consistent speed without regard for platform crowding (problem on Line 1 during rush hour), prevent most obstructions on track level delaying service, basically faster service, clear delay-related crowding faster and there's probably more benefits that I can't think of at 3am
 

Northern Light

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as is

perimeter seating 😱


not really sure why there was such opposition to it here, the Ontario Line is the perfect type of line to implement it

The opposition to perimeter seating is multi-faceted.

First, there are people who get motion sick from sideways motion/rocking.

Second, many people, myself included don't like the aesthetic of a cattle car; I'm not livestock, I don't even think livestock should be treated as it is; but that's a digressive tangent I'll avoid.

Suffice to say, I expect a certain degree of comfort, and if that comes as the expense of efficiency, so be it.

I feel the same way about office cubicles of under 100ft 2 being mistaken for 'an office'; and hard plastic seats being mistaken for chairs.

I'm under no illusions that were going to put in all swivel/reclining seats w/luxury materials and personal TVs.

But feel no desire to downgrade the travel experience from what it is today; I would, instead, prefer we aspire to improve upon it, at least modestly, rather than treating comfort as a needless frill.
 
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nfitz

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If perimeter seating is so great, why has Vancouver switched away from perimeter seating on their very narrow Skytrain trains?
 

micheal_can

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The opposition to perimeter seating is multi-faceted.

First, there are people who get motion sick from sideways motion/rocking.

Second, many people, myself included don't like the aesthetic of a cattle car; I'm not livestock, I don't even think livestock should be treated as it is; but that's a digressive tangent I'll avoid.

Suffice to say, I expect a certain degree of comfort, and if that comes as the expense of efficiency, so be it.

I feel the same way about office cubicles of under 100ft 2 being mistaken for 'an office'; and hard plastic seats being mistaken for chairs.

I'm under no illusions that were going to put in all swivel/reclining seats w/luxury materials and personal TVs.

But feel no desire to downgrade the travel experience from what it is today; I would, instead, prefer we aspire to improve upon it, at least modestly, rather than treating comfort as a needless frill.

All mass transit is a form of a cattle car. It is how you move as many people as possible as fast as possible. If you don't agree, ban standing on them while the train is in motion.
 

Northern Light

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All mass transit is a form of a cattle car. It is how you move as many people as possible as fast as possible. If you don't agree, ban standing on them while the train is in motion.

Actually, you are asserting a characteristic of public transit that is in no way inherent to it.

I'm also not clear on how you 'ban' standees unless you move to reserved seating; that seems a bit much.

I would prefer a model that assumed a few standees, rather than packed-in conditions in rush hour.

Packed-in modeling, aside from passenger discomfort, has the downside of larger dwell times as it takes long for people to reach exits, which in turn delays boarding.

In addition it serves to be problematic in emergency situations.

Be that as it may; I don't accept in any way, shape or form, that 'cattle car' culture and public transit are inextricably linked.

I also assert that to the extent they overlap, we should move away from such retrograde notions.
 

micheal_can

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Actually, you are asserting a characteristic of public transit that is in no way inherent to it.

I'm also not clear on how you 'ban' standees unless you move to reserved seating; that seems a bit much.

I would prefer a model that assumed a few standees, rather than packed-in conditions in rush hour.

Packed-in modeling, aside from passenger discomfort, has the downside of larger dwell times as it takes long for people to reach exits, which in turn delays boarding.

In addition it serves to be problematic in emergency situations.

Be that as it may; I don't accept in any way, shape or form, that 'cattle car' culture and public transit are inextricably linked.

I also assert that to the extent they overlap, we should move away from such retrograde notions.

Think of it this way, the only way to have no need to stand is if there is enough seats for all who ride. So, during peak periods, you would need more seats than can fit in the line. Maybe if lines were built faster than demand gets increased, you might get rid of the cattle car motion.
 

TossYourJacket

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Think of it this way, the only way to have no need to stand is if there is enough seats for all who ride. So, during peak periods, you would need more seats than can fit in the line. Maybe if lines were built faster than demand gets increased, you might get rid of the cattle car motion.
Building lines slowly is not an inherent problem of public transit, it's an inherent problem of how much Toronto hates anyone who isn't wealthy.
 

Rainforest

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The opposition to perimeter seating is multi-faceted.

First, there are people who get motion sick from sideways motion/rocking.

Second, many people, myself included don't like the aesthetic of a cattle car; I'm not livestock, I don't even think livestock should be treated as it is; but that's a digressive tangent I'll avoid.

Suffice to say, I expect a certain degree of comfort, and if that comes as the expense of efficiency, so be it.

I feel the same way about office cubicles of under 100ft 2 being mistaken for 'an office'; and hard plastic seats being mistaken for chairs.

I'm under no illusions that were going to put in all swivel/reclining seats w/luxury materials and personal TVs.

But feel no desire to downgrade the travel experience from what it is today; I would, instead, prefer we aspire to improve upon it, at least modestly, rather than treating comfort as a needless frill.

I hear you, but honestly I remember feeling less uncomfortable in a crowded train with perimeter seating than in a crowded train with standard seating.

If I can't move freely anyway, at least I have a better chance of moving at all when the passages are wide.
 

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