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Oakville custom home architecture

xy3

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I prefer precast with elegant proportions and high quality windows, wrought iron details, copper etc over generic poorly thought out designs clad in stone with cheap faux mullion windows or those ugly single-pane mullion-free contemporary window that clash with the traditional homes' design.
 

Memph

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@SunriseChampion not sure if this is a shift that has happened everywhere throughout the GTA, but around a decade ago, builders have largely switched from using Oriented Strand Board to real plywood in SE Oakville.

oOTN2yU.jpg
 

Memph

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OSB has never been used in serious construction in my 22 years in the industry.
Well I'm not sure what you're calling serious but...
 
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lenaitch

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Just front anecdotal observations I have to agree with Meph on residential builds, not just for tract projects but custom builds as well. They each have their pros and cons. OSB takes longer to absorb water (assuming edge sealing) because of its coating, and both will swell, but once OSB swells, the damage is permanent whereas plywood will generally settle back down.
 

SunriseChampion

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@Memph I'm sorry but those links don't show on my browser.....and, no, I won't consider changing browsers.

OSB isn't used by any builder I deal with.

From what I can tell it's weight bearing isn't as good as plywood. It's really not at all "my department" however.
 

Memph

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@Memph I'm sorry but those links don't show on my browser.....and, no, I won't consider changing browsers.

OSB isn't used by any builder I deal with.

From what I can tell it's weight bearing isn't as good as plywood. It's really not at all "my department" however.
Link 1 was a one off SFH developments in Topham Park at 49 Tiago Ave.
Link 2 was a 6 storey wood frame midrise at Sheppard & Markham Rd.
Link 3 were SFHs from a new subdivision under construction at Post Rd & Bowbeer Rd in Oakville.
Link 4 was townhouses at Silver Maple Rd in Oakville, also a new subdivision.
Link 5 was a 6 storey wood frame midrise at Bur Oak & Rustle Woods Ave in Markham.
Link 6 was a pair of SFHs under construction in Topham Park at 85 Furnival Rd.
 

wopchop

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Just front anecdotal observations I have to agree with Meph on residential builds, not just for tract projects but custom builds as well. They each have their pros and cons. OSB takes longer to absorb water (assuming edge sealing) because of its coating, and both will swell, but once OSB swells, the damage is permanent whereas plywood will generally settle back down.
OSB is is twice as strong as plywood in shear. It is often specified by engineers, especially on customs with large atrium type walls, for this reason.
Go take a look at any engineering I-joist product, and note what the core is made up of.
If you see any work on the west coast, where shear walls are a major deal for earthquake, you will notice all the OSB.
 

xy3

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The worst McMansions Ive seen built recently are grubby modern designs , usually with grey stucco and oversized garish picture windows.
 

wopchop

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The worst McMansions Ive seen built recently are grubby modern designs , usually with grey stucco and oversized garish picture windows.
Definitely a lot of these happening in Oakville, especially west of 4th line off Bridge Rd. Warminster drive has a lot, including some atrocious ones.
 

lenaitch

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OSB is is twice as strong as plywood in shear. It is often specified by engineers, especially on customs with large atrium type walls, for this reason.
Go take a look at any engineering I-joist product, and note what the core is made up of.
If you see any work on the west coast, where shear walls are a major deal for earthquake, you will notice all the OSB.
Wasn't aware of that. Good point about engineered products - I just figured it was more cost-based than structural. Tnx
 

Bojaxs

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Definitely a lot of these happening in Oakville, especially west of 4th line off Bridge Rd. Warminster drive has a lot, including some atrocious ones.
People here in Oakville care more about opulence than having something that looks good while also being functional. It makes me wonder how these people even obtained their wealth in the first place. Houses where the wealthy owner practices some form of "humility" usually turn out better than the houses owned by people who simply want to show off. It probably comes down to "new money" vs "old money" mind set.
 

junctionist

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It's true. You see so much architectural mediocrity in the wealthy parts of Oakville and Burlington among the large multi-million dollar houses (just like in many wealthy parts of the GTA), though there are some gems from too. There are many generic modern builds and boring, incoherent, or otherwise uninsightful historicist pastiches.

Many people's goal is mainly to have a big house in a "nice" area and expensive cars. There's too little awareness of architecture and design in our culture beyond the simplistic notion that everything has to look "fresh and updated".

Architectural design and history should be taught in high school (like music and art) to better educate people as to this aspect of our culture. That way, when they build a house for themselves or plan a new building at work, they can do so in a more cultured way.
 

wopchop

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There are many true custom homes in Oakville, but there are also many that are not.

A lot of lots being sold as 'custom homes', are lots owned by developers. Many older bungalows south of the QEW have been owned by developers, renting out these spaces for the interim. When they are ready to redevelop, some actually go ahead and have designs done. They then sell the real estate with the permit drawings to Owners. Some will sell the project to Owners, and offer different packages - so there is some customization but it is customization from developer chosen options. So in many cases, the expressions that you see on buildings do not entirely reflect the Owners.

Always remember that developers and contractors are inclined to limit choices for clients as much as possible. The more choices there are, the more possibilities for delays.
 
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christiesplits

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These three houses are an example of another style that's very popular with custom homes here. I'd say it peaked in popular just before modern architecture took off, although they're still being built today in decent quantities. I believe they mostly use fiber cement/hardie board rather than vinyl, and have elements of what I've seen described as "Nantucket style" or "Cape Cod style" housing. I haven't seen them as much in Toronto though (unlike modern style homes or the more typical neo-classical "chateau" style homes).

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This style pops up quite a bit among new-builds in The Beaches, although typically on a smaller house and lot.
 

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