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Novel Coronavirus COVID-19 (nCoV-2019)

DirectionNorth

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Fearless Studios: We are so fearless, we serve only unvaccinated clients.

We also offer 100% discounts to anyone who proves that Trump won the 2020 election, the Moon landing never happened, slavery based on one's ethnicity is great, Hitler is innocent, and edgy media are a greater threat to society than COVID-19 ever would be.

Anyone with a brain: Fearless Studios will easily go out of business in less than a year and no reputable banks will finance that health club.
"Health club." In quotes.

Go figure!
Speaking of Conservative hypocrisy, weren't these people complaining about vaccine passport for months? "It will reduce the freedom of people without vaccines" then turn around and reduce freedom.

Paywalled.
 

Videodrome

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In terms of the anti-vax gym, they also likely couldn't be insured against any liability. if/when there is a Delta outbreak.
 

Rufus8

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How is it the IOC thinks it's a good idea to have a major international sporting event in the middle of a pandemic? In the same breath they slam "wealthy" (Western?) countries for not helping with the vaccine - which was developed in the West? Could the message be anymore muddled? How is it people need a sporting spectacle to give them hope but not being free from a deadly disease?
 

W. K. Lis

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More kids are starting to catch colds again. Here’s why

From link.

Clinics and hospitals are seeing an increase in children catching the common cold and other non-COVID-19 viruses since the pandemic began.

The amount of children doctors are seeing for symptoms like fevers and headaches is similar to pre-COVID times, said Dr. Eddy Lau, a pediatrician at St. Joseph’s Health Centre. One possible reason for this uptick in benign viruses could be because kids are seeing each other more often now that they’re out of lockdown.

“This is, I think, within what we expect to be like a normal degree of viral spread among children who will be in contact with each other at let’s say, daycare, even pre-COVID,” said Lau, who is also a board member of the Canadian Paediatric Society.

Lau said that him and his colleagues at St. Joseph’s Just for Kids Clinic started noticing more visits for non-COVID illnesses around two months ago. Pediatricians are seeing more common cold-type illnesses in children with symptoms like runny noses, fevers, headaches, or aches and pains in the body.

“There’s a number of common viruses that are around all the time and when you are around other people in closer contact, you’re more likely to spread them,” Lau said.

Because kids are now getting more exposure to certain viruses that they didn’t encounter during lockdown, their immune systems are being put to work — which, Lau said, is a normal bodily reaction to new environments.

“It’s good for them to get exposed to these less significant viruses because it basically primes their immune systems to develop responses to them so that their immune system gets trained to fight illnesses,” Lau said.

On top of kids coming into contact with each other more frequently, Lau thinks that parents and guardians are more comfortable taking their children to clinics and hospitals now that COVID-19 cases are decreasing. When COVID-19 hospitalization counts were higher, some people wouldn’t bring their kids to the hospital because they were worried about risk of exposure.

“A lot of clinics and the hospitals have appropriate precautions and protocols on how to keep people safe when they come in,” Lau said. “Don’t be afraid to bring your child to get checked — I think that’s one thing we don’t want parents to be afraid to do.”
If a child has a fever for no more than two or three days and they’re eating and drinking well, “they just need some TLC,” Lau said. He suggests giving them some anti-fever medicine like acetaminophen or ibuprofen and making sure they stay hydrated.

But if a child’s fever persists, they have a loss of appetite or have any other concerning symptoms, they should get checked by a doctor. Newborns should also be taken to a doctor immediately since they’re more vulnerable to severe infections compared to older children.

To help prevent children from getting sick in the first place, it’s important to encourage healthy hygiene habits like wearing a mask or washing their hands, though Lau thinks lots of kids are already great at that.
Masks prevent illnesses from spreading by reducing the moisture droplets that people expel from their mouths when they breathe, cough or sneeze. Proper handwashing continues to be one of the best ways to stop the spread of viruses. And if your child is sick, keep them at home until they’ve recovered.

“A lot of younger school-aged kids are really good at wearing masks and they’ve learned a lot about their hand hygiene and things like that,” Lau said. “The precautions that they’re taking now are certainly better than pre-COVID times when a lot of these kids would just be sharing food or coughing on each other and not washing their hands.”

On top of making sure kids are staying healthy, as COVID-19 restrictions loosen, Lau said people need to understand how the pandemic has affected them to ensure they recover from the past year. He notes the “astronomical” mental health issues they’ve seen kids face in the past year. This is why it’s especially important for kids that COVID-19 is controlled so they can go back to being kids.

“For kids, getting back into school, proper social activities, sports, things like that (are) really important to get them back into a regular kind of routine.”
 

Northern Light

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Ontario is reporting 135 cases of #COVID19 and nearly 20,800 tests completed.

A few stats and graphs to join our daily DSC update:

1626878172789.png

From: https://twitter.com/jm_mcgrath

Also:

ICU down to 145

Vents down to 70
 

W. K. Lis

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Fully vaccinated people who got COVID-19 describe their mild symptoms, and their relief that they'd gotten a shot

From link.

Karlee Camme was supposed to see her grandparents for the first time in more than a year. Everyone was fully vaccinated and ready to go, but two days before the visit she lost her ability to taste and smell.

Camme, 24, had gotten the Johnson & Johnson vaccine a month prior. But it turns out she had a mild case of COVID-19.

Looking back, she realized the runny nose and heavy tiredness she'd experienced earlier in the week might have been early symptoms. It was only the loss of taste and smell that signaled it was anything more than a common cold, leading Camme to get a COVID-19 test.

The COVID-19 vaccines have been extremely successful at preventing serious illnesses that could lead to hospitalizations and deaths. But no vaccine is 100% effective at preventing infection, Dr. Lisa V. Adams, an associate dean for global health at Dartmouth College, told Insider.

"We know there are and will be some breakthrough infections in individuals who are vaccinated — at least until we get to a point where there is very little virus circulating," Adams said. "The good news is that their illness should be very mild."

The vaccines are designed to prevent hospitalizations and deaths

In early July, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said new data indicated that 99.5% of COVID-19 deaths in the US were in unvaccinated people.

Out of more than 157 million fully vaccinated Americans, only 733 people had died of COVID-19 as of July 6, according to CDC data. At least 3,554 people had been hospitalized and survived. The CDC is no longer tracking mild breakthrough cases.

About 75% of breakthrough infections occurred in people 65 and older. That included cases in nursing homes, whose residents and staff members were among the first Americans to get vaccinated.

Paul Offit, the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, told Insider that even with a smattering of breakthrough infections taken into account, the vaccines had met the goal of protecting most people from severe illness.

"The goal of these vaccines is to keep you out of the hospital and keep you out of the ICU and keep you from dying. If you have a mild infection where you're PCR positive and have essentially an asymptomatic infection, that's fine," Offit said, referring to a type of COVID-19 test.

'Breakthrough' cases might cause some symptoms, but they're usually mild

Emerging data suggests many breakthrough infections are so mild that they might as well be asymptomatic.

A recent analysis of breakthrough infections in the UK indicated that the top symptoms of Delta-variant COVID-19 were a runny nose and a headache, largely because most people mingling and exposed to the virus were younger or fully vaccinated.

Camme, for instance, was not sick enough to suspect she had COVID-19 at first.

Masha Gessen, 54, a staff writer for The New Yorker, also got sick despite being fully vaccinated. Their illness was fairly mild, they wrote for the magazine — their symptoms included a runny nose, itchy eyes, fatigue, and loss of smell, and they faded in about a week, they said.

In June, The New England Journal of Medicine described two similar cases that both resolved within a week of the people testing positive: a 51-year-old woman who had a sore throat, congestion, a headache, and loss of smell; and a 65-year-old woman who was also congested, fatigued, and headachy.

Travis Dagenais, 35, from Boston, told Boston 25 News that he got COVID-19 in early July, two months after getting his second shot of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine. He said his symptoms started as a cold, then developed into a fever that kept him up at night — but he dreaded to think what might have happened had he been unvaccinated.

"We have to realize that 94 or 95% is not 100%. This vaccine is not a shield. This vaccine is not an invincibility force," Dagenais told Boston 25 News. "To have gone through what I went through, I can't imagine what it would have felt like without the vaccine."

Tony Smith, 31, from Brooklyn, New York, told The New York Times that he developed COVID-19 for the second time on Sunday, months after getting his second dose of Pfizer's vaccine; he said it felt "like the crinkling of aluminum foil in my chest." He tweeted on Monday: "The symptoms I'm feeling right now vs. the symptoms I felt when I got COVID are nothing lol. That's the vaccine working!"

Less contagious to others

Even though Camme is still experiencing some symptoms of her breakthrough infection, she sees a silver lining in the fact that she didn't pass the virus to her loved ones.

"My partner didn't even get the vaccine and he didn't get the virus, and we were sleeping in the same bed until I tested positive," Camme said. "That's the thing — you may still get it, but the chance of you having to feel guilty about spreading it is a little bit less."

People who get COVID-19 despite being fully vaccinated typically have much less virus in their systems, meaning they could be less contagious, studies from Israel have found. The articles haven't been peer-reviewed, but the findings are promising.

More studies from Israel have suggested that Pfizer's vaccine may be 94% effective at preventing asymptomatic infections, reducing the risk of someone unknowingly transmitting the virus.

Vaccinating the majority of people is key

More people need to get vaccinated, Offit said. He estimated that 80% of the population would need to be immunized — through vaccinations or infections — to get the US out of the woods.

The worst of Camme's symptoms started a week after she tested positive. She felt winded walking from her car to work, stopping to catch her breath. She also experienced nausea, migraines, chills, and night sweats for nearly a month after her COVID-19 test, she said in April.

Three months later, Camme told Insider her symptoms are almost entirely resolved. She said she occasionally feels overly tired or run down in a way she did never did before getting COVID, but otherwise she's "pretty back to normal."

She has no doubt her vaccine protected her from a more severe case and the risk of so-called long COVID.

"I'm an advocate for the vaccine," she said. "The only way that we're going to get through this is if everybody or majority of the population gets vaccinated. I think that's the only step forward that we can take to being a more normal world again."
 

Bayer

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It's reassuring, but it all depends on the circumstances. In a month from now, I'm holding a small memorial in Québec for my mother who died in early March (of other causes). Even though my family is fully vaccinated, some are 80+ and vaccine efficacy drops precipitously after 80, and of course I'll return to my 68-year-old fully vaccinated but diabetic husband. So if a new wave is underway by then, I'm cancelling everything.
 

Towered

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How is it the IOC thinks it's a good idea to have a major international sporting event in the middle of a pandemic? In the same breath they slam "wealthy" (Western?) countries for not helping with the vaccine - which was developed in the West? Could the message be anymore muddled? How is it people need a sporting spectacle to give them hope but not being free from a deadly disease?

Are they implying that Japan needs help with the vaccine?
 

PinkLucy

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Rufus8

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Are they implying that Japan needs help with the vaccine?
I'm just wondering how 2 multi-national entities with billions between them suggest ordinary people or even accomplished athletes should risk their health so the event can go ahead.
 

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