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Metrolinx: Presto Fare Card

W. K. Lis

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It sounds like the paper cards needs to be activated and added to the system before they could be successfully tapped. Hence the 90 days expiry time. Stores would need a machine and software to physically activate the card and load it onto the system. I can see this happening with any smart card system to prevent fraud. Otherwise people would just clone those presto cards and sell on the black market.

The mom-n-pop stores work fine activating the lottery gift cards. Why not PRESTO?
 

rbt

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Hence the 90 days expiry time. Stores would need a machine and software to physically activate the card and load it onto the system.

There are 2 types of card. 90 day and 1 year, where the 1 year model is intended for other government agencies and not-for-profits to distribute.

I think most mom & pop shops can safely rotate their TTC ticket stock once a month, particularly when they're single-trip tickets. IIRC, they currently order by mail and can do so in fairly low volume.
 

W. K. Lis

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Meanwhile...


MTA shows off new tap-based OMNY pay system that will replace MetroCard

From link.

The MTA showed off its new tap-based payment system, known as OMNY, at a board meeting in Lower Manhattan Wednesday.

The system, short for One Metro New York, will eventually replace the MetroCard and will allow riders to pay with a fare card linked to a bank account, a mobile wallet payment, or the MTA app.

"We anticipate having some variances, not large, because we have done such extensive testing already," OMNY executive director Al Putre said. "But that's the goal, to eliminate any potential variances."

The system will allow riders to tap their way into the subway system, and it is scheduled to debut at 16 subway stations along the 4, 5 and 6 lines in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as all Staten Island buses, by the end of May.

"You don't have to wait in line to fill your card all the time," straphanger Keith Gilman said. "It's like an E-ZPass for the train."

Readers are also being installed at the Bowling Green subway station, across from MTA headquarters, for testing.

While many say they like the new approach, others had concerns about security.

"A little bit, because, you know, with all the hacking that goes on," rider Jessica Burrowes said. "So that's a little nerve-racking."

MetroCards will still be around until 2023.
 

littlewill1166

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They are real ahead of the technology curve. Sad
Not really, the TTC took credit cards when they had grey Thales readers installed on turnstiles a couple of years back. Can't find a photo though.
182259

Found the photo, turns out they were parkeon readers. They are made by the same company that makes the red fare vending machines on the new streetcars.
 
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Jonny5

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Tuscani01

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Not really, the TTC took credit cards when they had grey Thales readers installed on turnstiles a couple of years back. Can't find a photo though.

Found the photo, turns out they were parkeon readers. They are made by the same company that makes the red fare vending machines on the new streetcars.

TTC also accepted credit cards on the early Presto machines that were installed at Union, Dundas, and College. I used it several times when living at the Met.

It’s a shame that those readers were replaced with ones that don’t have debit/credit activated.
 

Andy T

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Not really, the TTC took credit cards when they had grey Thales readers installed on turnstiles a couple of years back. Can't find a photo though.
View attachment 182259
Found the photo, turns out they were parkeon readers. They are made by the same company that makes the red fare vending machines on the new streetcars.
From page 144 of this topic:
Has anyone tried using the new PRESTO reader at College Station?

j54j2BXl.jpg


Apparently it charges $3.00 instead of the usual $2.60...
Also does anyone know the progress with PRESTO integration with the TTC? I haven't heard of anything new being added since the master agreement announcement.
 

MetroMan

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Even though they're just starting, I'm kind of jealous. PRESTO is slowly slinking along towards possibly accepting credit/debit at some point in the indeterminate future. Meanwhile, New York's system accepts debit, credit, and ApplePay from the start.

Also, their terminals are intuitive and descriptive. I see people tapping on the PRESTO screen and of course it does nothing; the screens serve no purpose. There are small details in the MTA's system that make it intuitive. The blue lights frame the tapping area (the entire screen) and turn green when accepted. The Go arrow points up and diagonally to the turnstile. I've seen left handed people tapping on PRESTO terminals and entering through the wrong gate. On PRESTO there are 2 arrows pointing in different directions (!!). A down arrow has traditionally meant behind you, up means forward.

I really appreciate good design from a usability and intuitive understanding perspective and the MTA has got that nailed down. The TTC, not so much.
 
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littlewill1166

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Even though they're just starting, I'm kind of jealous. PRESTO is slowly slinking along towards possibly accepting credit/debit at some point in the indeterminate future. Meanwhile, New York's system accepts debit, credit, and ApplePay from the start.

Also, their terminals are intuitive and descriptive. I see people tapping on the PRESTO screen and of course it does nothing; the screens serve no purpose. There are small details in the MTA's system that make it intuitive. The blue lights frame the tapping area (the entire screen) and turn green when accepted. The Go arrow points up and diagonally to the turnstile. I've seen left handed people tapping on PRESTO terminals and entering through the wrong gate. On PRESTO there are 2 arrows pointing in different directions (!!). A down arrow has traditionally meant behind you, up means forward.

I really appreciate good design from a usability and intuitive understanding perspective and the MTA has got that nailed down. The TTC, not so much.

Their gates aren't wheelchair accessible. We could have had something similar if the TTC decided to retrofit the old turnstiles rather than get new fare gates.
 

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