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Metrolinx: Finch West LRT

Steve X

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Underground cables may imply underground substations, and they are a different story. There have been a couple of these in recent years in central Etobicoke.… with extra long outages.

- Paul
That reminds me of that transform that shorted out on my street during that flash flood of 2013
 

allengeorge

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Interesting - I don’t think there were any underground transformer blowouts in NYC as a result of Ida. Maybe they hardened their infrastructure to deal with floods?
 

Amare

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Interesting - I don’t think there were any underground transformer blowouts in NYC as a result of Ida. Maybe they hardened their infrastructure to deal with floods?
Simple answer, nope and they are still paying the price for it today:


Let's hope all the conduits they are building under the guideway on Finch will be resilient to any kind of flooding issues.
 

allengeorge

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Simple answer, nope and they are still paying the price for it today:


Let's hope all the conduits they are building under the guideway on Finch will be resilient to any kind of flooding issues.
The article was from Sandy. Ida happened a month ago. Didn’t read that ConEd had cut power to anyone, but admittedly, NYC is very large, and power cuts are probably on a block-by-block basis.
 

allengeorge

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Found the Ida numbers.

Honestly, 32000 customers for some of the worst flooding since Sandy is…pretty damn good, considering that all of NYC’s power lines are underground.
 

Northern Light

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Found the Ida numbers.

Honestly, 32000 customers for some of the worst flooding since Sandy is…pretty damn good, considering that all of NYC’s power lines are underground.

For contrast, I have a transformer substation just a block or two from me, and I hear an explosion there, sometimes associated with a power failure, sometimes just a flicker several times per year.

Ice build up is a huge issue in winter; lightning is an issue in the warmer months, but so are squirrels and raccoons and other creatures getting into and chewing on the equipment, typically to their detriment.

Its all trade-offs; but on the whole, undergrounding typically results in greater reliability/resiliency.


From the above:

1633054011256.png


Lots more detailed info at the linked page!
 

Amare

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The article was from Sandy. Ida happened a month ago. Didn’t read that ConEd had cut power to anyone, but admittedly, NYC is very large, and power cuts are probably on a block-by-block basis.
For some reason I was thinking of a 2001 storm, ive got to get some coffee in me clearly.
 

micheal_can

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Simple answer, nope and they are still paying the price for it today:


Let's hope all the conduits they are building under the guideway on Finch will be resilient to any kind of flooding issues.

A difference between New York and Toronto that people are not realizing is that New York is at sea level. A lot of their infrastructure is below sea level. Toronto isn't nearly that bad. Parts are below the lake level, but not much of it.
 

Northern Light

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A difference between New York and Toronto that people are not realizing is that New York is at sea level. A lot of their infrastructure is below sea level. Toronto isn't nearly that bad. Parts are below the lake level, but not much of it.

The differences are a bit more complex than that, but you are right.

Toronto, however, does have many areas in floodplains.

Now, we don't, for the most part, run continuous underground wire through out valleylands.
But we do have a number of roads that dive low, both into valleys, but also under highways, railways etc, where surface water build up could be a concern.
But there are also several ways to address that, including where your points of entry are to any hydro vault/conduit, drainage design inside same etc etc.

Its important to say, there are different ways to underground.

Simple cable, narrow conduit (not for a human, just space around the cable); trench, but also human-scaled corridor.

All of these come with different costs, and different benefits.
 
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Steve X

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Pumps can fail, concrete can crack after old age. Then there is the extreme case where something new like the Boston Big Dig project was soaking in salty sea water on day one.

Remember that time the Keele to Ossington had to shut down case the transform room was flooded from a fail pump.
 

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