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Metrolinx: Finch West LRT

smallspy

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Does that mean we can bury all wires in 25ish years?
No.

There's other infrastructure that is associated with those lines - the wires are just one aspect. The towers, for instance....

If everything lines up and it is all up for replacement in one cycle, then maybe it might make sense. Maybe.

Dan
 

turini2

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Some great photos in the September CLC deck - this project is really coming along!

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turini2

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Speaking of wires, are they planning on burying the hydro wires along the street? They did that with the Yonge and Bloor-Danforth subway projects, as well as the Spadina and St. Clair streetcar projects. It improves the public realm significantly and encourages investment.
Not 100% sure, but I think so.
The CLC doc states that “The high voltage switch was moved from the old overhead wires to the new underground duct bank” which is certainly evidence in favour!
 

turini2

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Speaking of wires, are they planning on burying the hydro wires along the street? They did that with the Yonge and Bloor-Danforth subway projects, as well as the Spadina and St. Clair streetcar projects. It improves the public realm significantly and encourages investment.
Yes looks like they are - 2021 Open House
Relocating gas, water, storm and sanitary Road widening is underway pipes, as well as hydro utility (i.e. duct banks, and traffic signals)
 

Amare

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Speaking of wires, are they planning on burying the hydro wires along the street? They did that with the Yonge and Bloor-Danforth subway projects, as well as the Spadina and St. Clair streetcar projects. It improves the public realm significantly and encourages investment.
It does?
 

Amare

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I would guess in the same way that street trees, public art, clean sidewalks and a road not full of holes encourages investment - it makes it look like you care for a place, rather than not giving AF.
Normally I would go on and agree, but then I look at roads like Adelaide St, Queen St, or King St downtown and tend to think developers and others really couldnt care less at to the state of how a public realm looks. There's no doubt that having an LRT encourages investment, but i'm not sure i would stretch that theory out to hydro wires.
 

junctionist

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I think so. It makes the public realm look cleaner, better maintained, less utilitarian, and more attractive overall. That, in turn, attracts business investment. Quality main street businesses tend to look after the public realm and tend to encourage a stronger sense of community. In turn, the area becomes more attractive to mixed-use intensification (developer investment), as people enjoy vibrant main streets and want to live close to them.
 

Amare

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I think so. It makes the public realm look cleaner, better maintained, less utilitarian, and more attractive overall. That, in turn, attracts business investment. Quality main street businesses tend to look after the public realm and tend to encourage a stronger sense of community. In turn, the area becomes more attractive to mixed-use intensification (developer investment), as people enjoy vibrant main streets and want to live close to them.
We're veering off topic here, but I disagree. Sure having utility lines buried makes the public realm looks cleaner and more attractive, but it has very little on businesses being attracted to an area or not. For instance, College St between Ossington and Spadina has above ground hydro poles and it's public realm is generally pretty good despite the fact. Businesses still invest in the area and the BIA is very successful.

The only issue I have is that Toronto's current public realm design for streetscapes is sterile, and all over the place. We had a great template to start off with and improve on with Spadina but instead of following up with that, we've experimented with so many mindnuming designs which have been inferior in one way or another (ie: Finch will have one set of streetscape design, Eglinton another, Queens Quay West yet another, Queens Quay East another, and so on).
 

junctionist

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We're veering off topic here, but I disagree. Sure having utility lines buried makes the public realm looks cleaner and more attractive, but it has very little on businesses being attracted to an area or not. For instance, College St between Ossington and Spadina has above ground hydro poles and it's public realm is generally pretty good despite the fact. Businesses still invest in the area and the BIA is very successful.

The only issue I have is that Toronto's current public realm design for streetscapes is sterile, and all over the place. We had a great template to start off with and improve on with Spadina but instead of following up with that, we've experimented with so many mindnuming designs which have been inferior in one way or another (ie: Finch will have one set of streetscape design, Eglinton another, Queens Quay West yet another, Queens Quay East another, and so on).

Burying utility wires is just one 'tool' to get the job done of keeping commercial areas vibrant and revitalizing those that aren't. It's not a prerequisite or the key ingredient, but it helps. The Junction saw significant revitalization after the hydro wires were buried on Dundas Street West.

St. Clair West saw a revitalization with its streetscape overhaul, which included burying the overhead hydro wires along most of the route. Almost all parts of Bloor, the Danforth, and Yonge Street have buried overhead wires and vibrant retail areas, as well.
 

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