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Mayor John Tory's Toronto

That's not the point though. The speed limit's upper value is set to reflect safety concerns for all conditions.

Regardless, being able to ignore limits *safely* isn't reason to give ploughing priority to cars. If it is, it truly is a nanny state.

And someone in a car has armour, seatbelts and (now) multiple airbags around them if they crash. Someone on the street does not.
When they increased the speed limit on some Ontario highways from 100 km/h to 110 km/h, what changes to the road was made? Nothing, except the signs. Because the highways are already DESIGNED for speeders doing more than 120+ km/h.

From link.

Beginning April 22, 2022, the speed limit will be raised permanently to 110 km/h on the following sections of provincial highways in southern Ontario:

  • Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) from Hamilton to St. Catharines (32 km)
  • Highway 402 from London to Sarnia (90 km)
  • Highway 417 from Ottawa to the Ontario/Quebec Border (102 km)
  • Highway 401 from Windsor to Tilbury (approximately 40 km)
  • Highway 404 from Newmarket to Woodbine (approximately 16 km)
  • Highway 417 from Kanata to Arnprior (approximately 37 km)
In addition to raising the speed limit permanently on sections of highways in southern Ontario, at the same time, the province is also raising the speed limit to 110 km/h on a trial basis on the following sections of provincial highways in Northern Ontario:

  • Highway 400 from MacTier to Nobel (approximately 55 km)
  • Highway 11 from Emsdale to South River (approximately 45 km)
 
Walter,

Travelling between 110 KM per hour and 140 KM per hour is alot more dangerous when any amount of snow is on the road. It is alot harder to stop and someone is more likely to crash.

Sidewalks and windrows are not as big of a deal because people are not going as fast and can handle the conditions better.

Try going 130 KM per hour and hitting a patch of snow.. watch what happens.
Rick Mercer: Winter Driving
 
First agenda, November 23, 2022...
http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/decisionBodyProfile.do?function=doPrepare&meetingId=23057#Meeting-2023.CC1

First Meeting - Organization of the Council - Meeting 1
FM1.1 Call to Order (Ward All)
FM1.2 Confirmation of Election Results (Ward All)
FM1.3 Declaration of Office by the Mayor and Presentation of the Chain of Office (Ward All)
FM1.4 Declarations of Office by the Members of Toronto City Council (Ward All)
FM1.5 Confirmation of the Declarations of Office (Ward All)
FM1.6 Introduction of the Members of Council and Presentation of the Declarations of Office by Mayor John Tory (Ward All)
FM1.7 First Meeting Address by Mayor John Tory (Ward All)
FM1.8 Election of the Speaker and Deputy Speaker (Ward All)
FM1.9 Appointment of the Striking Committee (Ward All)
FM1.10 City Council Recess (Ward All)
Routine Matters - Meeting 1
RM1.1 Moment of Silence (Ward All)
RM1.2 Introduction of Striking Committee Report and New Business from the Mayor and City Officials (Ward All)
RM1.3 Declarations of Interest (Ward All)
RM1.4 Petitions (Ward All)
RM1.5 Presentations, Introductions and Announcements (Ward All)
RM1.6 Review of the Order Paper (Ward All)
New Business - Meeting 1
CC1.1 Extension of Alcohol Sales and Service Hours during 2022 FIFA World Cup Qatar (Ward All)

A revised Appendix 1 was posted on November 18, 2022.
CC1.2 Update on Bill 23, More Homes Built Faster Act, 2022 (Ward All)
CC1.3 Multi-Year Debenture and Temporary Borrowing Authorities - Current Term of Council 2022 to 2026 (Ward All)
CC1.4 Demolition of Designated Properties at 1196-1204 and 1206-1210 Yonge Street (Ward 12)

The Toronto Preservation Board has submitted a transmittal on this Item (CC1.4a with recommendations).
CC1.5 415 Broadview Avenue - Notice of Intention to Designate a Property under Part IV, Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act (Ward 14)

The Toronto Preservation Board has submitted a transmittal on this Item (CC1.5a with recommendations).
Bills and By-laws - Meeting 1
BL1.1 Introduction and Enactment of General Bills and Confirming Bills (Ward All)
 
This is the official explanation of Schedule to Bill 23 that, if passed, would allow the Mayor and 8 Councillors to pass by-laws. As revealed by the press, Mayor Tory suggested this change - to his eternal shame!

SCHEDULE 1
CITY OF TORONTO ACT, 2006

The Schedule amends the City of Toronto Act, 2006 by adding section 226.9.1. Section 226.9.1 provides that if the head of council is of the opinion that a by-law could potentially advance a prescribed provincial priority, the head of council may propose the by-law and require city council to consider and vote on the proposed by-law at a meeting. The by-law is passed if more than one third of the members of city council vote in favour of the by-law.
 
This is the official explanation of Schedule to Bill 23 that, if passed, would allow the Mayor and 8 Councillors to pass by-laws. As revealed by the press, Mayor Tory suggested this change - to his eternal shame!

SCHEDULE 1
CITY OF TORONTO ACT, 2006

The Schedule amends the City of Toronto Act, 2006 by adding section 226.9.1. Section 226.9.1 provides that if the head of council is of the opinion that a by-law could potentially advance a prescribed provincial priority, the head of council may propose the by-law and require city council to consider and vote on the proposed by-law at a meeting. The by-law is passed if more than one third of the members of city council vote in favour of the by-law.
I thought the province would have to OK the by-law to confirm it does advance provincial priorities...
This wording seems to suggest that the Mayor simply has to be of the opinion that it does so
 
The priority on Toronto streets needs to change. Currently, it seems that the almighty automobile get priority in decisions made at city countil.

European Commission prioritises cyclists and pedestrians in cities for "first time in history"

From link.

The European Commission has proposed an overhaul of urban infrastructure to encourage more walking and cycling as part of the EU's aim to become a net-zero continent by 2050.

If passed, the Efficient and Green Mobility package would require the 424 largest cities in the Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) to hash out sustainable urban mobility plans (SUMPs) centred on these kinds of "active mobility" modes by 2025.

Supported by increased funding, this would help the EU wean its cities off fossil fuel vehicles, ease congestion and noise pollution as well as working towards the decarbonisation goals set out in the European Green Deal, which require emissions from cars to be cut by 55 per cent come 2030.

The EU has already tripled its spending on cycling and walking projects in recent years, investing €2 billion between 2014 and 2020.

But the Efficient and Green Mobility package is unprecedented, according to the European Cyclists' Federation, in that it elevates walking and cycling to an EU-wide policy priority.

"This is the first time in history that the European Commission prioritises investment in these modes as the backbone of urban mobility," the federation said.
Proposals could cut emissions by 90 per cent

The package includes four proposals aimed at decarbonising the European transport system.

These focus on overhauling the TEN-T system of interconnected railways, waterways and roads across the continent, increasing long-distance and cross-border rail traffic, updating and developing smart mobility services such as mobility apps, and improving urban mobility by focusing on public transport, walking and cycling.

By moving people and goods from fossil fuel-powered cars and trucks onto a cleaner "multimodal transport network", the European Commission says these measures could cut transport emissions by up to 90 per cent.

As part of the proposed legislative overhaul, the SUMPs originally introduced as a voluntary initiative in the EU's 2013 Urban Mobility Package would be made mandatory for hundreds of large and medium-sized cities in the TEN-T.
In addition, the guidelines for formulating these plans would be revised to prioritise expanding and improving infrastructure for bikes, pedestrians, e-bikes, scooters and public transport.

This would include creating quality road infrastructure that protects users from fatal accidents, maintaining the "continuity and accessibility of cycling paths" and, eventually, formulating rules to improve the safety of micro-mobility vehicles, which have been responsible for a growing number of accidents in recent years.

Local and regional authorities would be supported by targeted funding in order to implement their plans.
Cycle lanes save money

According to the EC, this would not just generate emissions reductions but also help to improve the health of local residents.

"Active mobility modes such as walking and cycling are low-cost and zero-emission forms of mobility which can also bring about health co-benefits associated to more active lifestyles," reads the Urban Mobility Framework of the Efficient and Green Mobility package.

"In order to develop their full potential, they should be properly addressed in urban mobility policies at all levels of governance and funding, transport planning, awareness-raising, allocation of space, safety regulations and adequate infrastructure."

Installing bike paths can even lead to economic benefits for cities as medical costs and travel times are reduced, the EC argued.

In Helsinki, for example, a study found that for every euro invested in cycle lanes, the city saved €3.60.
Later this year, the EC is set to recommend that member states roll out a national programme for all their cities to adopt a SUMP "with public transport and active mobility at its heart".

The news comes after a number of cities including Paris, Milan and London took street space away from cars and reallocated it to cyclists and pedestrians in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, while New York established cycle paths on its Brooklyn and Queensboro Bridges.
 

London, New York, Paris and Milan give streets to cyclists and pedestrians

From link.

Cities across Europe and the Americas are drawing up plans to take street space away from cars in favour of cyclists and pedestrians in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Urban spaces are being temporarily remapped to prioritise people walking and cycling while maintaining social distancing of up to two metres in major cities around the world including London, New York, Paris, Berlin, Milan and Bogata.

The initiatives come amid growing support for measures to make cities more friendly to pedestrians and cyclists.

"Whenever feasible, consider riding bicycles or walking," the World Health Organisation has advised.

"The way to enhance freedom of movement without raising the risk of infection is to create more space," said environmentalist George Monbiot. "Shutting streets to cars, so pedestrians can use them instead, is a good start. So is opening up golf courses, locked squares and other exclusive green places."

Today London has announced Streetscape, an action plan for rapidly building temporary cycle lanes and blocking vehicle traffic on residential streets.
London plans may become permanent

Mayor Sadiq Khan and Transport for London (TfL) announced that temporary cycle lanes are being planned for major routes around the city, and on-street parking and car lanes will be commandeered to create wider pavements.

"Many Londoners have rediscovered the joys of walking and cycling during lockdown and, by quickly and cheaply widening pavements, creating temporary cycle lanes and closing roads to through traffic we will enable millions more people to change the way they get around our city," said the mayor.

TfL predicts that the city's public transport system will only be able to run at a fifth of pre-coronavirus capacity, so residents who cannot work from home still will need to walk or cycle. The WHO has warned that people should avoid public transport at peak times, keep one metre away from passengers at all times. Bus and train users should avoid touching handrails and wash their hands as soon as possible after their journey.

"The capacity of our public transport will be dramatically reduced post-coronavirus as a result of the huge challenges we face around social distancing," continued Khan.

TfL said the scheme, while temporary, could become permanent.
New York creates more space for cyclists

New York mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to close 40 miles of road in the city to cars during the month of May. Seven miles have already been given over to people walking, jogging or cycling, according to a report by NPR.

Eventually the city government wants to have 100 miles of road temporarily turned into "open streets" near its parks for cyclists and pedestrians.

On the other side of the country, Oakland in California has enacted a scheme called Oakland Slow Streets, which consists of 15 corridors, totalling 14 miles in length, where people can walk, cycle and run while social distancing.

Soft closure barriers, such as signs and traffic cones, mean that emergency vehicles can still access the roads closed to vehicle traffic.
Paris forges ahead with plans for car-free city centre

The Rue de Rivoli, one of Paris' most famous shopping street, was closed to cars on 30 April and will continue to be pedestrian and cyclist-only for the summer.

To ease pressure on existing public transport routes, cycling lanes that follow the Paris Metro's most popular routes are also being considered. In total, 400 miles of temporary cycle routes are planned for post-lockdown Paris.
Paris' mayor Anne Hidalgo had already been enacting a long-term plan to make the French capital greener before coronavirus struck, planting "urban forests" and phasing out older and more polluting cars from the city centre.

She doubled down on this commitment at a council meeting last week about France's plans to ease its lockdown on 11 May.

"It is out of the question that we allow ourselves to be invaded by cars and by pollution," said Hidalgo, warning "it will make the health crisis worse".
Milan limits cars in the city after coronavirus

Milan, which has started to ease its strict lockdown this week, plans to gradually introduce 22 miles of temporary cycle lanes over the summer.

Called Strade Aperte, or Open Roads, the plan lays out new road layouts with wider pavements. A 20 mile per hour speed limit will also be imposed on some roads and bridges.

Some neighbourhoods will be temporarily pedestrianised so children can play outside and people can use the streets for exercise.

The city is also considering requisitioning some public space for bars and cafes to place tables for customers to make up for those lost space indoors now that people have to social distance.
Berlin pushes through temporary cycle lanes

In Berlin, local officials have used the crisis to push through measures such as temporary cycle lanes much faster than usual as car traffic has dropped by 40 per cent.

"Road traffic regulations state that if there is a change in traffic volume, we can act quickly and create new, perhaps temporary, cycling lanes," Berlin Roads and Parks Department official Felix Weisbrich told German broadcaster Deutsche Welle.

Lines on the roads now mark the new boundaries of cycle lanes that have been widened by a metre to allow people, especially key workers, to move around while maintaining a safe distance.

"As a cyclist, should be well protected during this pandemic," added Weisbrich. "When you pass other bikers you need to be at least one-and-a-half-meters away from them."
Bogota increases cycle lanes for commuting key workers

In South America, Colombian capital Bogota is using cycle lanes to keep people moving. Colombia's president Iván Duque announced yesterday that the country would extend its lockdown until 26 May.

Bogota's local government has introduced 200 miles of temporary cycle lanes for key workers to use for commuting. Cyclists using the routes must wear personal protective equipment such as face masks, gloves and goggles.

"We expanded the number of kilometres so that the citizens who go out to work can use these new corridors," said Bogota director of recreation Blanca Inés Duran.

Temporary hand-washing stations have also been erected at public transport stations.
 
Toronto can start by giving streetcars and light rail vehicles (and buses) first priority with their own signal at right-of-ways, such as Spadina, The Queensway, and Eglinton East. Currently, the single-occupant motor vehicles turning left go ahead of the 70+ people on board streetcars, who have to wait.
 
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Toronto can start by giving streetcars and light rail vehicles (and buses) first priority with their own signal at right-of-ways, such as Spadina, The Queensway, and Eglinton East. Currently, the single-occupant motor vehicles turning left go ahead of the 70+ people on board streetcars, who have to wait.
Howabout making Yonge, King, Queen and Bloor in the core pedestrian-only? Most of these have wider/higher speed "bypass" streets already.
 
I was looking at the City Directory today ( https://www.toronto.ca/city-governm...aff-directory-divisions-and-customer-service/ ) It was 'interesting' to see how many fax machine numbers were still listed. Does anyone still use fax - even the provincial government is phasing them out. This despite this 2021 motion

City Council consideration on May 5, 2021
MM32.23
ACTION​
Adopted​
Ward: All​
The Last Time Internet Regulations Were Passed, People Said, “Fax It To Me” - by Councillor Paul Ainslie, seconded by Councillor Stephen Holyday
1. City Council direct the City Manager, in consultation with the Chief Technology Officer, to draft a plan by the end of 2021 to phase out traditional telephone fax lines for City Divisions.

I have emailed the acting City manager and copied the two Councillors, we will see - or not!
I got a response!

"The current plan to transition to virtual fax will be completed by the end of March 2023. Fax lines with low to no usage will be decommissioned by the end of 2022, public information will be revised by January 2023, and the remaining fax numbers required by City divisions to address their operational needs will be converted by March 2023."
 
Recall a study done by the TFD that looked into getting smaller vehicles, and the result was it would be more expensive in the long run. They would need multiple specialized trucks to replace the current fleet and still provide the same level of service. That our varying density and large service areas make it hard to accommodate all possible calls with smaller vehicles.
 
Recall a study done by the TFD that looked into getting smaller vehicles, and the result was it would be more expensive in the long run. They would need multiple specialized trucks to replace the current fleet and still provide the same level of service. That our varying density and large service areas make it hard to accommodate all possible calls with smaller vehicles.

Hmmm, you don't think TFS might have put their thumb on the scale do you? LOL

Here's a report on Ottawa's experiment with smaller trucks.


From the above:

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