Hurontario LRT | Metrolinx

DirectionNorth

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I am actually surprised more cyclists aren't killed since a lot of them don't follow the rules of the road (or any rules for that matter). Do they not teach bicycle safety in school anymore? I was taught to dismount the bike to cross an intersection. Wear a helmet is also a good rule. For even better safety, wear a safety vest especially at night, dusk or dawn. You would be surprised how many cyclists wear black at night. I have seen a disturbing new trend along Eglinton Ave. and that is the amount of cyclists on the road when there is a perfectly good bike path completely separated from the road. Not sure why they would go on the road. Since I drive a commercial vehicle, I do change lanes to allow cyclists the full lane but there have been several times (downtown Toronto) when a cyclist in a bike lane darts out into my lane for no reason without looking. I think some people are trying to get killed and the speed won't make any difference.
Sometimes, bikers don't like the fact that the trails are out of the way, or have a destination on the road. I take parallel, less-busy roads whenever I can - but many people don't. What if there is no alternate route? I would not generalize, because people have unexpected circumstances (many a pothole that a car can drive over, a bike cannot). Do we expect cars to take an inconvenient route to protect bikers because "there's a perfectly good road right next to it"?

I see how some cyclists bike dangerously. But there are also poor drivers. You can't just blame an entire group for something caused by a small portion of it. For this reason, I hesitate to blame drivers 100% of the time - poor road design is probably a larger factor.

Anyways, this is off topic. Could a mod move the last few cycling related posts to a cycling thread or the Vision Zero thread?
 

Steve X

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I am actually surprised more cyclists aren't killed since a lot of them don't follow the rules of the road (or any rules for that matter). Do they not teach bicycle safety in school anymore? I was taught to dismount the bike to cross an intersection. Wear a helmet is also a good rule. For even better safety, wear a safety vest especially at night, dusk or dawn. You would be surprised how many cyclists wear black at night. I have seen a disturbing new trend along Eglinton Ave. and that is the amount of cyclists on the road when there is a perfectly good bike path completely separated from the road. Not sure why they would go on the road. Since I drive a commercial vehicle, I do change lanes to allow cyclists the full lane but there have been several times (downtown Toronto) when a cyclist in a bike lane darts out into my lane for no reason without looking. I think some people are trying to get killed and the speed won't make any difference.
Since they don't have a license plate, some think they are entitled to running reds and ploughing through open streetcar doors. Now that the city have timed lights to give pedestrians a head start, bikes take advantage of that. The whole point is for pedestrians to not get run over by turning traffic, not avoiding cyclists.

Bike safety such as dismounting on the "highway" (MTO's definition of any roadway) and wearing a helmet is optional. If it's a pedestrian zone, cyclist should dismount. Lights are required for riding at night on the "highway". Again, no enforcement.

I understand that bikes should be allowed to yield to stop signs and one way roads provided they actually check for surrounding. Natural selection takes cared of stupidity but unfortunate it involves inconveniencing others. If parents don't teach kids not to dart across the roadway in front of traffic, they are terrible parents.
 

sixrings

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I understand that bikes should be allowed to yield to stop signs and one way roads provided they actually check for surrounding. Natural selection takes cared of stupidity but unfortunate it involves inconveniencing others. If parents don't teach kids not to dart across the roadway in front of traffic, they are terrible parents.
I’d just like to say that everyone on Urban Toronto has been so kind to Jason’s sister after his death. Very sensitive to mental health. That said what if the five year old father who witnessed his son die on Elm Avenue was also a member of these forums. As someone whose in-laws live close to Hurontario i can assure you that locals treat this local street like the highway it once was. At the very least, my condolences to the Ali family and forgive us of as We often know not what we do.
 

Northern Light

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Since they don't have a license plate, some think they are entitled to running reds and ploughing through open streetcar doors. Now that the city have timed lights to give pedestrians a head start, bikes take advantage of that. The whole point is for pedestrians to not get run over by turning traffic, not avoiding cyclists.

Bike safety such as dismounting on the "highway" (MTO's definition of any roadway) and wearing a helmet is optional. If it's a pedestrian zone, cyclist should dismount. Lights are required for riding at night on the "highway". Again, no enforcement.

I understand that bikes should be allowed to yield to stop signs and one way roads provided they actually check for surrounding. Natural selection takes cared of stupidity but unfortunate it involves inconveniencing others. If parents don't teach kids not to dart across the roadway in front of traffic, they are terrible parents.

This is a truly offensive post.

A 4 year old boy in Mississauga is dead.........

Period. Full-Stop.

An 11 year old boy in Markham is dead......

Period. Full-stop.

There is no excuse whatsoever for blathering on about 'natural selection'.

What is called for is sympathy, empathy, and decency.

It is possible, in any given case that the child's actions may (or may not) have contributed to what happened.

But that is not 'natural selection'.

Its bad road design, bad driver training; and perhaps, the absence of proper training for young cyclists too.

That's on the adults, not merely the child's parents, but government, educators, transportation planners, driving schools, and a host of others.
 

DirectionNorth

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Since they don't have a license plate, some think they are entitled to running reds and ploughing through open streetcar doors. Now that the city have timed lights to give pedestrians a head start, bikes take advantage of that. The whole point is for pedestrians to not get run over by turning traffic, not avoiding cyclists.
An education program would help; our culture won't allow cycling education.
I understand that bikes should be allowed to yield to stop signs and one way roads provided they actually check for surrounding. Natural selection takes cared of stupidity but unfortunate it involves inconveniencing others.
Do we immediately blame the driver 100% of the time after a fatal car accident? It sounds like you're offloading responsibility to cyclists. Both cyclists and drivers need to take responsibility for road safety. There are both bad cyclists and drivers. We need better driver education and cycling safety courses in school.
If parents don't teach kids not to dart across the roadway in front of traffic, they are terrible parents.
Does that absolve the driver of responsibility? Is it the kid's fault? If it were reversed, so the driver was speeding, does that mean the cyclist has no responsibility in a crash?
 

Northern Light

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An education program would help; our culture won't allow cycling education.

The TDSB has a modest cycling education program, delivered through partner agencies; but its voluntary (and has a price) for schools that wish to offer it.


I would argue for 'mandatory'; CANBIKE 1, plus the course providing bicycles (for the purpose of the class) to any students who don't have or can't bring one.
 

Transportfan

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I don't understand how so many bikers are ok with it. When I drive through the area, I refuse to pass a biker unless the opposing lane is empty and I'm able to cross the yellow line to give the biker space. Many other drivers are not willing to do that and will pass dangerously close!

Because most bikers have been doing it forever and aren't part of the zealous cycling crowd
 

afransen

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I am actually surprised more cyclists aren't killed since a lot of them don't follow the rules of the road (or any rules for that matter). Do they not teach bicycle safety in school anymore? I was taught to dismount the bike to cross an intersection. Wear a helmet is also a good rule. For even better safety, wear a safety vest especially at night, dusk or dawn. You would be surprised how many cyclists wear black at night. I have seen a disturbing new trend along Eglinton Ave. and that is the amount of cyclists on the road when there is a perfectly good bike path completely separated from the road. Not sure why they would go on the road. Since I drive a commercial vehicle, I do change lanes to allow cyclists the full lane but there have been several times (downtown Toronto) when a cyclist in a bike lane darts out into my lane for no reason without looking. I think some people are trying to get killed and the speed won't make any difference.
Making cyclists dismount is anti-cycling. The infrastructure should support people riding across the street as is natural.

A safety vest is not really necessary. You should have good lights, reflective tape and a bell.
 

afransen

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Both cyclists and drivers need to take responsibility for road safety.
I would add those who design infrastructure hold a lions share of responsibility. If you make a roadway that is comfortable to traverse at 80kph and put a speed limit of 30 kph, I would argue it is the fault of the designers that people speed on that road.
 

DirectionNorth

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I would add those who design infrastructure hold a lions share of responsibility. If you make a roadway that is comfortable to traverse at 80kph and put a speed limit of 30 kph, I would argue it is the fault of the designers that people speed on that road.
Agree, but there is no shortage of reckless behavior from both groups. Education is a stopgap while road design catches up.
 

drum118

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June 15
To get thread back on topic, all traffic lights south of Dundas have been converted with the south service Rd not turn on yet.

The east side of Hurontario north of Mineola is construction staked with the stakes a fair distance east of the current property line. Single lane south of Mineola with work taking place in the northbound lanes starting at the RR bridge. Waterline going in first. Don't use Hurontario if you want to go north of the Lakeshore

Happen to run into management for miWay that I have known for 20 years who not happy with the Port Credit LRT station while shooting the area. While we were talking, an employee of Mississauga Transportation Work Transit Capital Division show up who I know for over 15 years as well having a major hand on the LRT. He was also unhappy with the station as he prefer to an surface station than the one that will be 60' below grade as well stop short of the Lakeshore..

The hole for the station and the box is getting deeper and longer.

Photos to follow
 

drum118

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Wait this won’t get all the way to lakeshore? Seems like a massive mistake.
No Kidding and a huge mistake. If the Lakeshore BRT/LRT surface, how do Hurontario riders connect to it other than a walking transfer, wait for a route 8 bus or the X bus still running on Hurontario.

If an LRT is built on Lakeshore you need to push the Hurontario Line underground and create an T for Lakeshore which is no big deal. The question then become how do you service both lines and interchange with the lines using 2 different gauges since Lakeshore will be an TTC line??
 

Coolstar

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No Kidding and a huge mistake. If the Lakeshore BRT/LRT surface, how do Hurontario riders connect to it other than a walking transfer, wait for a route 8 bus or the X bus still running on Hurontario.

If an LRT is built on Lakeshore you need to push the Hurontario Line underground and create an T for Lakeshore which is no big deal. The question then become how do you service both lines and interchange with the lines using 2 different gauges since Lakeshore will be an TTC line??
Yeah. But luckily Port Credit will be built with a future extension in mind from what I've heard.
 

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