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How has gentrification impacted politics in Toronto?

King of Kensington

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Parkdale-High Park and Davenport, the epicenters of creative class hipsterdom in Toronto, have definitely shifted leftward over the past 15-20 years. On the other hand, some NDPers I know blame "gentrification" for the losses of Peggy Nash, Andrew Cash and Craig Scott in 2015 (i.e. these hipsters sipping expensive cocktails at the Gladstone Hotel care more about veganism and bike lanes than working class issues or something like that).

FWIW AOC in NYC did especially well in "hipster" areas against the old school Irish Democrat, better than in the Hispanic areas actually.

CC @mjl08 @adma
 

King of Kensington

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Meanwhile, the gentrification moving politics more toward the liberal center argument holds up more in the East End (more homeowner-dominated). Nowadays Beaches is basically a Liberal riding that goes NDP during swings, it used to be in the top tier.
 

mjl08

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I volunteered for the NDP in the 1990s in Broadview-Greenwood (now Toronto Danforth). North Riverdale and Playter Estates had some of the strongest support for the NDP. 25 years later it is now their weakest area of the riding.

The loss of the middle class, and in particular, public union employees, in the old city limit has definitely hurt the NDP and working class mobilization. The modern Liberal Party of Trudeau speaks the language of the upper-middle class, creative, and bourgeois-left-of-centre types. The type of voter in the Riverdale or Cityplace who supports public transit or gender neutral pronouns, but whose eyes glaze over when the NDP talk about P3s or income inequality. With the odd exception, like the Orange Wave in 2011 and the Strategic Voting of the last provincial election, I predict the NDP will continue to lose support in the old city limits over time.

You are also seeing 'hyper-gentrification' in areas like The Beach and High Park, once upper-middle class areas, which now feel more like North Toronto or Oakville.

As an aside, I always felt like The Beach was like a streetcar suburb with the sensibilities of a suburb suburb. I believe south of Kingston Road has some of the highest levels of car ownership in the old city limits. I recall eating brunch at a packed Beacher Cafe last summer, looking at the customer base, and feeling like I could be in Burlington.

I predict gentrification will also change the way we eat in the city. I think we're less than ten years away from monolithic suburban restaurant groups taking over Queen East, Danforth and Bloor West, as rents continue to increase and small businesses struggle. Toronto's culinary palette will be about as diverse as that of a Milton Smart Centre.
 
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stanko

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You are also seeing 'hyper-gentrification' in areas like The Beach and High Park, once upper-middle class areas, which now feel more like North Toronto or Oakville.
I live in Oakville and I wish any part of this town was even 10% as interesting as The Beaches or High Park

Other than that, I understand where you're coming from and agree 100% with the rest of your post. I grew up in the same riding you were volunteering in and my parents were voting NDP there
 

King of Kensington

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Another thing - Justin Trudeau is more "woke" than Chretien or Martin were (or Mulcair for that matter, whose style appealed neither to the "creative class" types in the Annex or the old blue collar union vote in places like Sudbury).
 

ShonTron

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I live in Oakville and I wish any part of this town was even 10% as interesting as The Beaches or High Park

Other than that, I understand where you're coming from and agree 100% with the rest of your post. I grew up in the same riding you were volunteering in and my parents were voting NDP there
Don't dismiss Oakville entirely. While Lakeshore Road downtown is kinda dull (though it at least has a few good restaurants and street BBQ sausages in the summer) Kerr Street is the type of downtown-ish place where the rents aren't high enough to drive out more interesting businesses.
 

narduch

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I predict gentrification will also change the way we eat in the city. I think we're less than ten years away from monolithic suburban restaurant groups taking over Queen East, Danforth and Bloor West, as rents continue to increase and small businesses struggle. Toronto's culinary palette will be about as diverse as that of a Milton Smart Centre.
This is already happening and its sad.
 

King of Kensington

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Another thing - Justin Trudeau is more "woke" than Chretien or Martin were (or Mulcair for that matter, whose style appealed neither to the "creative class" types in the Annex or the old blue collar union vote in places like Sudbury).
Further to the point, remember which Liberals represented Danforth and Trinity-Spadina then - Dennis Mills and Tony Ianno. Both were terrible fits for the "creative class" professional demographic of the Annex and Riverdale.
 

ShonTron

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I'd argue that Bill Morneau is a terrible fit for Toronto Centre, while Adam Vaughan is a very good fit for Spadina-Fort York, and possibly the only Liberal MP that's truly a comfortable urban rep. Erskine-Smith, though, is the kind of Liberal MP Beachers seem to like. One that would otherwise be most comfortable in a place like Don Valley West.
 

Jonny5

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Another thing - Justin Trudeau is more "woke" than Chretien or Martin were (or Mulcair for that matter, whose style appealed neither to the "creative class" types in the Annex or the old blue collar union vote in places like Sudbury).
Makes sense about the Annex as the Late Millennials there would obsess over out-wokeing each other since that's really only a game for them and they don't care about (and aren't even aware of) actual outcomes. Instamagram and Tweeter likes are all that's about.

This is already happening and its sad.
That happened and was complete 15 years ago.
 

King of Kensington

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I'd argue that Bill Morneau is a terrible fit for Toronto Centre, while Adam Vaughan is a very good fit for Spadina-Fort York, and possibly the only Liberal MP that's truly a comfortable urban rep. Erskine-Smith, though, is the kind of Liberal MP Beachers seem to like. One that would otherwise be most comfortable in a place like Don Valley West.
Agree with your assessment. Morneau wins on the strength of the Trudeau brand, not as a Bay St. guy from Moore Park married to a McCain.

I believe that Morneau wanted to run in DVW initially, but Rob Oliphant wanted his old seat back.
 

King of Kensington

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Interesting. Beaches is indisputably Hillary. I would definitely put Dufferin Grove in Bernie territory though (southern Davenport is "hipster central"). Agree with the rest.
 
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