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GO Transit: Service thread (including extensions)

anb

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During the Metrolinx Board Mtg, Phil Verster reports the following % of pre-COVID traffic levels:
GO Transit Weekend 100%
GO Transit Weekday 45%
UP Express 56%
If the weekday is only 45% they really need to get on a peak train themselves and re evaluate what they’re looking at. The London or Niagara bound train alone will definitely pull a few hairs out. Unless if they’re also counting off peak and evening trains which would make sense but I still see a lot of traffic on some lines. So I still don’t get where its only that number because it feels like its a lot more than that.
 

Northern Light

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During the Metrolinx Board Mtg, Phil Verster reports the following % of pre-COVID traffic levels:
GO Transit Weekend 100%
GO Transit Weekday 45%
UP Express 56%

To which I say, if you won't give me back 15M weekday service on Lakeshore, can we at least get it on the weekends?
 

ShonTron

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Luckily the Welland Canal bridge already has a decent amount of elevation over the Welland Canal due to it being on the escarpment edge and adjacent to a lock (quick measurement appears to be about 12m of clearance).

Maximum ship height on the Canal is 35.5m, so assuming we give an extra few metres of height (say 38m, which seems to align with other bridges) we would need to elevate the existing bridge by about an additional 26 metres in height. That would still require a pretty significant structure, especially on the west side of the Canal where the rail lines already slop up towards the Canal, but wouldn't be as significant as you may think.

There is space to berm most of the grade change as well from a quick glance, which should reduce costs.


Still going to be hundreds of millions of dollars, but at quick glance the project wouldn't be too much larger than the Davenport Diamond project, if anything likely a similar cost point given a less constrained construction environment and likely far less structure involved.

The Davenport Diamond contract was $175 million, for comparison.

Come to think of it, there is one more option, though it would also be expensive: a second rail bridge and approaches, likely north of the existing canal, allowing for continuous rail service, much like the Victoria Bridge on Montreal's South Shore. It would be built on vacant Seaway Authority and GM land.
 

innsertnamehere

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If the weekday is only 45% they really need to get on a peak train themselves and re evaluate what they’re looking at. The London or Niagara bound train alone will definitely pull a few hairs out. Unless if they’re also counting off peak and evening trains which would make sense but I still see a lot of traffic on some lines. So I still don’t get where its only that number because it feels like its a lot more than that.
it feels a lot more because GO Is still running a fraction of the service levels it did pre-pandemic. LSW peak hour service had 13 trains enter Union between 7 and 9am, while current service sees just 6.
 

Bordercollie

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it feels a lot more because GO Is still running a fraction of the service levels it did pre-pandemic. LSW peak hour service had 13 trains enter Union between 7 and 9am, while current service sees just 6.
Do they need to cycle more stored cars Into service? It takes time to inspect them and bring them back into service? How long does that take?
 

innsertnamehere

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Do they need to cycle more stored cars Into service? It takes time to inspect them and bring them back into service? How long does that take?
No Idea.

The frustrating thing is that last summer they had restored 13 peak hour arrivals, albeit with more locals and less expresses, but here we are with far less ridership and less service still.
 

Admiral Beez

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It’s not rocket science, but there are numerous steps and activities.
I understand, but I watch these vids on North American rail, tie and bed replacement and I can help but think, this seems economically doable for connecting Peterborough to Toronto (or Oshawa)by rail.


 

Bordercollie

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I understand, but I watch these vids on North American rail, tie and bed replacement and I can help but think, this seems economically doable for connecting Peterborough to Toronto (or Oshawa)by rail.


But to increase speeds on that line you need to change the curves to be more straight, which will require you to change the profile of the tack bed.

You also need to make the curves longer so you will need to do some engineering in some places.

Does anyone know what the track speed was designed for originally? 50mph?
 

crs1026

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Does anyone know what the track speed was designed for originally? 50mph?

A 1948 Employees' Timetable places the following speed restrictions on passenger trains between Glen Tay and Agincourt

- 50 mph on curves between Glen Tay and Ronaldson
- 55 mph on curve MP 63.55 (west of Tweed)
- 60 mph on curves Ronaldson to Havelock
- 60 mph on curves between Havelock and Peterboro
- 60 mph on curves between Tapley and Claremont
- 2800 class locomotives - 60 mph at any point while handling passenger equipment Glen Tay to Agincourt
- 3100 class locomotives - 50 mph at any point while handling passenger equipment Glen Tay to Agincourt
In theory lighter classes of passenger locomotives (which were more typical of those actually used on this route) could go 75 mph on tangent

I'm not sure what that proves, considering that diesels have very different centers of gravity and would have had their own speed restrictions. Provided, of course, that they were equipped with speedometers - which many didn't have.

- Paul
 
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crs1026

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I understand, but I watch these vids on North American rail, tie and bed replacement and I can help but think, this seems economically doable for connecting Peterborough to Toronto (or Oshawa)by rail.

Sure, replacing the track is a relatively straightforward task that railroads and contractors are knowledgeable and effective about.

(Just bring money).

But it assumes that what's underneath is solid and does not need restoration or modification.

- Paul
 

Bordercollie

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A 1948 Employees' Timetable places the following speed restrictions on passenger trains between Glen Tay and Agincourt

- 50 mph on curves between Glen Tay and Ronaldson
- 55 mph on curve MP 63.55 (west of Tweed)
- 60 mph on curves Ronaldson to Havelock
- 60 mph on curves between Havelock and Peterboro
- 60 mph on curves between Tapley and Claremont
- 2800 class locomotives - 60 mph at any point while handling passenger equipment Glen Tay to Agincourt
- 3100 class locomotives - 50 mph at any point while handling passenger equipment Glen Tay to Agincourt
In theory lighter passenger locomotives (which were more typical of those actually used on this route) could go 75 mph on tangent

I'm not sure what that proves, considering that diesels have very different centers of gravity and would have had their own speed restrictions. Provided, of course, that they were equipped with speedometers - which many didn't have.

- Paul
I guess basically as fast as it would go? Would be the speed limit? (At the time).

I have a question about how the CSA controls the doors on the train, I see that in the accessibility coach there is a tablet that allows them to select which doors open and close. I guess it's either open or doors before or after the accessibility coach?

How did they do this in the old days when the conductor sat at the top?

Also does the CSA tell the engineer when the doors are closed and the train can depart?
 

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