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GO Transit Fleet Equipment and other

LemonCondo

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I have been saying since 2007 that GO needs a number of different types of train sets as well the length of them.

My trip to Europe in 2010 reinforced my views and were reinforced again this year.

Every system I saw had both single and double deck trains that range from 2 cars to 20 cars. Most where duel ends with power at both end, power one end with cab car at the other end along with DMU's. Some trains were made up with 2-4 sets of 3 car EMU with power at each ends of the 3 cars set or 2 sets of 5 cars sets. High speed trains work this way as well, but that is another story. Even saw a single and DD cars part of one train with a locomotive at one end.

Some trains that were both single and double deck ran like GO current system as well with power at both ends. Mostly on 8-12 car trains.

We were forced to take other routes to get to are next place to visit as all trains were sold out on the day we were to travel weeks and months in advance in place of waiting 2-4 days for a train. What took place on these trains again reinforced the idea of one train becoming 2 or 3 trains going from A-Z as well another train hooking onto ours going to our station.

We left Copenhagen as one train and became 2 trains part way. My section carry on while the other section when elsewhere in the opposite direction before we departed. This new train became 2 more trains when we had to transfer to an RER train bound for Hamburg. The section we were on became a 2 car DMU going one way while the other 3 car became an EMU going in the opposite direction. The train was single level.

What got me was the fact that a gangway between cars were larger than normal and found out about 10 minutes before our transfer to an RER station why. That gangway became cab control ends that folded out from the side that were lock in place by the train conductor. As the train was to stop at the station, the conductor broke the connect between the 2 cabs and ended up 10 feet apart.

Haft way to Hamburg on the RER, our 5 car EMU took a bang at a station that indicated to me that another train just attached to ours. In Hamburg, we were a 10 car EMU DD train. Again, this train split in 2 with each going in opposite direction and not the only one I saw doing this. Joining trains together was done in route to free up access for more trains to the station at the same time.

Very common to see 2 trains on the same track at the same tome going in opposite direction as well arriving the same way. Something ML has looked at, but gone a different route these days. A few other systems were doing this as well.

If I look at a NF train, it could be duel power one end with 3 cars and attach to another train in Hamilton that would join an EMU in Burlington to become say a 12 cars or less to Toronto.

Sat at a number of tables on various systems that were 2 or 4 seats.

Yeah exactly. I don't know why the people here are convinced that Metrolinx MUST operate only one kind of train or else. Phasing in EMUs as well as operating duel-mode locos with the existing bi-level cars is just so painfully obvious that I don't understand what the opposition to it is.

(It's foamers.)
 

APTA-2048

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GO had tables at one point I think.
They did. They were removed for safety reasons after one of those collisions in California, I believe, showed they caused serious injury. A new table design was devised that is designed to deform and absorb the impact of the body in a collision. I’m actually surprised to see Vancouver still has the older style tables.
 

drum118

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They did. They were removed for safety reasons after one of those collisions in California, I believe, showed they caused serious injury. A new table design was devised that is designed to deform and absorb the impact of the body in a collision. I’m actually surprised to see Vancouver still has the older style tables.
Saw various of types of tables from foldup haft table that became a larger when a leaf was folded out for single seats to 4 seat. Them there was a table that was haft table that was attach to the wall for 2 seaters.

We over kill things based on a single cases or fail to understand the cause of the situations.
 

crs1026

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Yeah exactly. I don't know why the people here are convinced that Metrolinx MUST operate only one kind of train or else. Phasing in EMUs as well as operating duel-mode locos with the existing bi-level cars is just so painfully obvious that I don't understand what the opposition to it is.

(It's foamers.)

I'm sure that new designs are going to arrive. The issue is how fast, and how many.

The foamers are the ones who suggest replacing existing equipment before it's worn out, because they enjoyed a particular type of train in Europe or like the looks of what they see in on railpictures.net. Or have their own fantasy vision of what GO RER intends to become, which is bizarre because ML has not been all that specific with details of its actual vision.

I keep saying, the next generation of whatever is ordered will be determined by a spreadsheet exercise, involving a whole bunch of variables that we enthusiasts have no hard numbers about, and going well beyond what we can imagine or care about. Some variables may be obvious, some may be common sense, but some will demand a whole bunch of engineering data and a Net Present Value calculation.

- Paul
 

lenaitch

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They did. They were removed for safety reasons after one of those collisions in California, I believe, showed they caused serious injury. A new table design was devised that is designed to deform and absorb the impact of the body in a collision. I’m actually surprised to see Vancouver still has the older style tables.
I wonder if they would still be practical for commuter service in our climate. Bulky coats, laptops, shoulder bags, purses that look like the owner is running away from home. I only vaguely recall them but don't recall a whole lot of 'tummy room'.
 

Krypto98

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Yeah exactly. I don't know why the people here are convinced that Metrolinx MUST operate only one kind of train or else. Phasing in EMUs as well as operating duel-mode locos with the existing bi-level cars is just so painfully obvious that I don't understand what the opposition to it is.

(It's foamers.)
Ahhh foamers... who don't understand much about what it takes to operate a railway
 

rbt

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Phasing in EMUs as well as operating duel-mode locos with the existing bi-level cars is just so painfully obvious that I don't understand what the opposition to it is.

EMUs make sense for Metrolinx, but it's not Metrolinx that's making the decisions about rolling stock.

ONxpress is making that decision and they've got a 25 year contract starting 2023. Reality is, if they replaced rolling stock for the core lines, nearly all of it would be under 20 years old when their contract terminates as would any facilities created for their maintenance. I presume they will not receive an end-of-contract bonus from Metrolinx for leaving behind functioning rolling-stock.

A smaller number of general-purpose locomotives is cheaper to manufacture, and potentially resell if ONxpress retains ownership at the end of the contract.


If it was a 40 year operations/maintenance contract, ONxpress may have made different decisions.
 
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APTA-2048

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I wonder if they would still be practical for commuter service in our climate. Bulky coats, laptops, shoulder bags, purses that look like the owner is running away from home. I only vaguely recall them but don't recall a whole lot of 'tummy room'.
‘Tummy room’ was alright. Of course the person on the aisle would have to get up if the person on the window needed to leave. They also got rid of the armrest at seats with a table. They weren’t at every seat, so passengers could sit at a space without one. I don’t think people really cared much when they were removed. I wouldn’t object if they introduced the new table design at some seats, though.
 

SaugeenJunction

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Some points are not worth debating. We know GO is going with electric locos hauling shorter trains for RER (OnCorr). It is going to be a pretty big electric loco order, so that is exciting. We also know GO is ordering more diesel locomotives in the near term, with a supplier TBD.

An opportunity for an early start for EMUs is on the Milton Line IF the solution for that corridor ends up being building dedicated passenger tracks beside the CP ones, so wires can be strung up and it can operate in a unique environment from freight. That corridor would see massive ridership with OnCorr-style frequencies, and could justify some of the EMU infrastructure like specific yards. Lots of “ifs” however.
 

Krypto98

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Careful. There are certainly enough railroaders who's view is so narrow as to also not understand.

Dan
This is extremely true...
Some points are not worth debating. We know GO is going with electric locos hauling shorter trains for RER (OnCorr). It is going to be a pretty big electric loco order, so that is exciting. We also know GO is ordering more diesel locomotives in the near term, with a supplier TBD.

An opportunity for an early start for EMUs is on the Milton Line IF the solution for that corridor ends up being building dedicated passenger tracks beside the CP ones, so wires can be strung up and it can operate in a unique environment from freight. That corridor would see massive ridership with OnCorr-style frequencies, and could justify some of the EMU infrastructure like specific yards. Lots of “ifs” however.
Wouldn't that require a grade separation to go from the south end to North end?
 

drum118

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This is extremely true...

Wouldn't that require a grade separation to go from the south end to North end?
There been talk for years of having GO go from the southside to the northside in a fly under at the west end of Lambton yard.

Its the best place to do it and it keeps GO out of CP way for the route except for Streetsville area. Got the room to put in the 2nd track for GO where the track doesn't exist today.

Lisgar GO Station was built to be a centre platform like Erindale and Kipling station. Cooksville is setup now to be a centre platform once track 1 is built for it over Hurontario St that will connect to the existing track 1 on the westside of Confederation Dr.
 

Deadpool X

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Some points are not worth debating. We know GO is going with electric locos hauling shorter trains for RER (OnCorr). It is going to be a pretty big electric loco order, so that is exciting. We also know GO is ordering more diesel locomotives in the near term, with a supplier TBD.

An opportunity for an early start for EMUs is on the Milton Line IF the solution for that corridor ends up being building dedicated passenger tracks beside the CP ones, so wires can be strung up and it can operate in a unique environment from freight. That corridor would see massive ridership with OnCorr-style frequencies, and could justify some of the EMU infrastructure like specific yards. Lots of “ifs” however.
EMUs generally have a higher floor and you will need a special set of high platforms at Union for Milton line trains. That can be done but that will limit the use of platforms to only one line and reduce the flexibility of switching platforms for other lines if needed.
 

tsm1072

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EMUs generally have a higher floor and you will need a special set of high platforms at Union for Milton line trains. That can be done but that will limit the use of platforms to only one line and reduce the flexibility of switching platforms for other lines if needed.
There are plenty of EMUs with low floors. The GO network is standardizing to a 760mm610mm level boarding height and they will be able to get a variety of emu and non-emu, both single and double level rolling stock with that door height
 
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