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Eglinton West LRT | Metrolinx

Johnny Au

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The NL information is buried somewhere in here:


The Netherlands had an average 2,150 cyclist hospital admissions for head/brain injuries per year from 2003-2007. Per-capita travel by bicycle was 2.5km/day.

Australia had about 1,122 serious head injuries in Australia in 2005/06 for cyclists. Per-capita travel by bicycle was 0.1km/day in that time period.

Australia has a 25% higher population, but even still it's quite clear Australia has far higher number of hospital admissions per km cycled than Netherlands despite most of Australia having mandatory helmet laws at that time. These injury rates were down significantly from the '80's before helmet laws were in place.

I don't have Canadian (or Ontario) numbers but I expect they're much closer to Australia's than NLs.
Not just that, but the Dutch Olympic cycling organization mandates wearing a helmet.
 

Northern Light

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cplchanb

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Short list of bidders is out for the Eglinton West LRT contract.

Likely to be awarded around this time next year.

curious on what the decision making process is. What do they have to review that will take almost a year especially since most of the contractors are well known and have done past jobs?
 

sixrings

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curious on what the decision making process is. What do they have to review that will take almost a year especially since most of the contractors are well known and have done past jobs?
Maybe the feds will send in their covid money and this thing can get bumped up the list just to rub salt on Scarboroughs transit wounds.
 

officedweller

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curious on what the decision making process is. What do they have to review that will take almost a year especially since most of the contractors are well known and have done past jobs?
The process tyically goes as follows:

Request for Expressions of Interest (RFEOI) - Potential consortia (different joint ventures are assembled for each project by various companies, each with an applicable expertise in their field (ie construction operations, engineering, tunnelling, etc)). Each consortium submits documents supporting their expertise, etc. (i.e. a resume). The field of potential proponents is narrowed to the most qualified - this is where the Province/Metrolinx is at now. This is important because a bid proposal can cost several hundreds of thousands of dollars to prepare.

Reqest for Proposals (RFP) - The qualified bidders are invited to submit detailed proposals for the project and how they meet the specifications required by the Province/Metrolinx in the RFP. These will take several months for the bidders to prepare. For a design, build, finance contract it would include all of those aspects, so detailed design and costing (for a fixed price contract) would be prepared by the proponent - i.e. a room full of binders.
In responding to the RFP, each proponent will show how it does or does not meet the requirements (including pricing and costs), specfications and functionality required by the RFP, allowing an "apples to apples" comparison of the bids.
Proposals may also contain alternate submissions or options (separately priced) which deviate from the 'base proposal' under the RFP.
The submitted proposals would then be evaluated by Province/Metrolinx (again, months to do) and compared to one another for costs and benefits. Province/Metrolinx may have to go back to each proponent for clarification of elements in each proposal. Province/Metrolinx would then select a successful proponent with whom to negotiate a contract.

Contract Negotiation - Once a successful proponent is selected, the final contract needs to be negotiated with the proponent (again, this can take additional months). The contractual terms will be negotiated by the legal teams and the design and technical specifications will be finalized by the engineering teams and attached as schedules to the contract (although some contracts allow for ongoing design work on the fly after construction has started, but it would be within the fixed price). This is also where there may be some negotiations and "value-engineering" to get the project into the government-approved funding envelope (ie within budget). The proponent may also contribute additional financing (at a cost) if government sources are not sufficient. Any deviation from the agreed scope would be a Change in the Work and would impact price (this is where contractors try to add costs).

For example, here's the contractual structure for Vancouver's Canada Line, where the proponent (InTransitBC) provided $657 million in financing:


 
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CapitalSeven

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curious on what the decision making process is. What do they have to review that will take almost a year especially since most of the contractors are well known and have done past jobs?
Perhaps they are reviewing why they are boring a deep tunnel beneath a 300 foot wide prairie to carry 4K people an hour.
 

W. K. Lis

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Eglinton Flats is a floodplain of the Humber River, located between what will be the Eglinton Flats Portal, east of Jane Street, to the Scarlett Road Portal, west of Scarlet Road.

From link.

Eglinton Flats includes three of the four corners surrounding the Jane and Eglinton intersection. The fourth corner is the City run Scarlett Woods Golf Course. The area, built on the Humber River Floodplain, was owned and farmed by the Scarlett family in the mid 1800's. It was later turned into a market garden that was flooded out by Hurricane Hazel in 1954. As part of a new floodplain plan the area was turned into parkland. Eglinton Flats is a sports focused park with six soccer fields, four field hockey pitches, a rugby field, a football field and winterized tennis courts. It is also home to a local community garden and playground. In the northeast corner of the park you will find two cricket pitches. The park is a popular place to spend time through the spring, summer and fall.
 

Allandale25

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Amare

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I dont even care anymore, just build something. If they want to pour away billions unnecessarily and leave tax payers on the hook subsidizing the operations for centuries than by all means go ahead. Clearly the mass populous doesn't care if they'll have services cut or taxes hiked substantially to pay this off in the future.

The choice was between a massively overbuilt underground line in this project, or a literal streetcar in ROW with unnecessarily stops littered everywhere. Both options are deeply flawed.
 

crs1026

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Agreed but I want transit built and these guys are moving fast. Meaning that it's likely the transit will be built. Unlike the high hopes I had to be riding on all the transit city lines by now.
Most of us want transit built, and quickly.

Now - How do you feel about paying extra taxes because these guys are overbuilding lines with unneeded capacity that will run half empty and could be built much cheaper if they weren’t going underground? And telling you they won’t be building other things that are badly needed, because they pissed away all the money on these vanity transit projects? And letting time pass redesigning what the City had designed a couple years ago?

Speed is critical, but getting things sized right matters too.

- Paul
 

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