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Cycling infrastructure (Separated bike lanes headed downtown)

ADRM

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From Mike Layton's staff, on the now-delayed Davenport bike lane/road safety upgrades:

I checked in with Staff to get the latest on their timeline, and they sent me the following. Phase 1, between Bay and Yonge, is actually starting next week, but Bay to Dupont has been delayed until May/June of 2022. Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,

Aviva

From the timeline standpoint, nothing has changed since my last email on June 22, 2021. However, due to the continuous conflict with the active development work zone on the north side of Davenport Rd between Dupont St and Bedford Rd, we had to scope down the installation work a bit. The most recent update is that we are planning for installation of phase 1—the new cycle tracks on Davenport Rd between Bay St and Yonge St—starting next week (weather dependant). The construction notice for phase 1 has gone out already (please see attached for your reference).

This phase might also include an upgrade to the existing NB shared cycling facility on Bay St between Scollard St and Davenport Rd to a dedicated bike lane, for which, we are currently in the discussion with TTC on resolving some minor issues.

As I know many others are increasingly pointed out, I'm getting right sick and tired of councillors perpetually deferring to Staff. Off the top of my head, in Mike's ward in the last 12 months, this is at least the third major bike safety improvement project that has been delayed, in addition to him listening to Staff tell them why they can't or shouldn't do anything in response to the literal deaths of people on Christie and Avenue in two separate incidents.

Time for so-called progressiveness to find their feet and do some f***ing work or get out of the way for people who actually know how to get shit done.
 

Northern Light

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From Mike Layton's staff, on the now-delayed Davenport bike lane/road safety upgrades:



As I know many others are increasingly pointed out, I'm getting right sick and tired of councillors perpetually deferring to Staff. Off the top of my head, in Mike's ward in the last 12 months, this is at least the third major bike safety improvement project that has been delayed, in addition to him listening to Staff tell them why they can't or shouldn't do anything in response to the literal deaths of people on Christie and Avenue in two separate incidents.

Time for so-called progressiveness to find their feet and do some f***ing work or get out of the way for people who actually know how to get shit done.

Agreed. Without diminishing the above at all; I would share that a major management plan for a major park in Toronto is more than 2 full years overdue..........

That, in turn, is the excuse for others to delay implementing capital projects " because we're waiting on the plan"

The problem of excuses from staff and consultants is mind-blowing...........

****

Likewise, the endless delays for the new stairs from Dundas which were held up by Mx for years.

Councillors/The Mayor put up with BS from staff, who abide it from each other, and other agencies.........to no end.

The idea of actually saying to someone 'Not later, now, or else' seems beyond the reach of too many.
 

torontocolin

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Agreed. Without diminishing the above at all; I would share that a major management plan for a major park in Toronto is more than 2 full years overdue..........

That, in turn, is the excuse for others to delay implementing capital projects " because we're waiting on the plan"

The problem of excuses from staff and consultants is mind-blowing...........

****

Likewise, the endless delays for the new stairs from Dundas which were held up by Mx for years.

Councillors/The Mayor put up with BS from staff, who abide it from each other, and other agencies.........to no end.

The idea of actually saying to someone 'Not later, now, or else' seems beyond the reach of too many.
This was an inevitable consequence of the cut to council. The wards are too big, so individual councillors can't be experts on the nuance of every project in their ward. This leads to them deferring to staff advice because they don't have the time to understand the issue well enough to push back.
 

Northern Light

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This was an inevitable consequence of the cut to council. The wards are too big, so individual councillors can't be experts on the nuance of every project in their ward. This leads to them deferring to staff advice because they don't have the time to understand the issue well enough to push back.

I didn't agree with the cuts to Council.............

But this was most certainly an issue before then, I've been dealing with this for a long time.............as have many others here!
 

ADRM

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I didn't agree with the cuts to Council.............

But this was most certainly an issue before then, I've been dealing with this for a long time.............as have many others here!

Exactly. And you get a sense of exactly that if and when you have genuine, off-the-record conversations with those councillors; they defend their deference to Staff on attitudinal/ideological grounds, not practical/operational ones (which is actually the most frustrating part of it).

New blood needed on Council, simple as that.
 

DSC

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Exactly. And you get a sense of exactly that if and when you have genuine, off-the-record conversations with those councillors; they defend their deference to Staff on attitudinal/ideological grounds, not practical/operational ones (which is actually the most frustrating part of it).

New blood needed on Council, simple as that.
Though I too think Council needs some new blood, there ARE advantages in having a Councillor who 'knows the history" and (maybe more importantly) has a long-serving staff who have built up the personal contacts that are so useful in dealing with an organisation like the City that is separated into many silos! Despite the increase in Ward size, I still see Councilors trying to get TOO involved in things that they really should stay out of, either because they are of interest to some vocal constituents or to their political base.
 

Northern Light

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1632441068130.png
 

W. K. Lis

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Coming to Toronto by the 22nd century...

Bill Legalizing the Idaho Stop in California Waits for Governor's Signature



The Idaho Stop—allowing people on bikes to treat stop signs in empty intersections as yield signs—is gaining popularity around the country. Next (not quite) stop: California.

From link.

California Assembly Bill 122, also known as the Safety Stop Bill, is awaiting Governor Gavin Newsom's signature after passing the State Legislature. The bill would legalize the "Idaho Stop"—or the practice of allowing people on bikes to treat stop signs as yield signs. The Idaho Stop is a favorite cause of bike safety advocates, who argue that keeping momentum through an intersection is often safer than stopping for people on bikes.

In a (paywalled) article on AB 122, Ricardo Cano provides background on the Idaho Stop and the legislation, noting that Idaho Stops are illegal, though many people on bikes already treat stop signs as yield signs.

"Under the bill, bicyclists approaching a stop sign would be allowed to instead treat it as a yield sign by slowing down and proceeding if it’s safe to do so and there are no pedestrians or car traffic approaching or entering the intersection," explains Cano.

"Lawmakers and supporters of AB122 say the bill would improve cyclists’ safety, encourage more people to ride bikes and bring state law up to speed with the behaviors and best practices already used by experienced cyclists."

According to Cano, "the bill passed both the state’s legislative chambers with strong support," but the bill has been waiting for the governor's signature since the beginning of the month. Newsom has until Oct. 10 to decide on the bills.

As also noted by Cano, "Two other traffic-related bills are awaiting a signature or veto from Newsom. The Legislature also passed AB43, which would give cities more flexibility in reducing speed limits, as well as AB1238, which removes fines and penalties for jaywalking when there are no cars present."

Washington was the most recent state to make the Planetizen newsfeed for legalizing the Idaho Stop, in September 2020.

See also https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/California-cyclists-could-treat-stop-signs-as-16468180.php
 

Admiral Beez

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Another change I would like to see is a law that all single lane one way streets are open to bicycles in the opposite direction. It seems silly to get from Wellesley and Sumach to my mate’s house located slightly south on Sumach at Wellesley that I must cycle down Sackville to Winchester and then back up Sumach to essentially Wellesley.

 

W. K. Lis

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Another change I would like to see is a law that all single lane one way streets are open to bicycles in the opposite direction. It seems silly to get from Wellesley and Sumach to my mate’s house located slightly south on Sumach at Wellesley that I must cycle down Sackville to Winchester and then back up Sumach to essentially Wellesley.



From link.
In Belgium since about 2005, and in France since 2010, the default position in towns has been for one-way streets to be available for cycling in either direction, known in French as sens unique limité (SUL) in Belgium and double sens cyclable (DSC) in France. In this case, a contraflow cycle lane is often marked in paint, with dotted white lines and ideograms of a bicycle, either all the way along the street if busy, or more commonly just at junctions.

In the Netherlands, most one-way streets are two way for cyclists, although this is not always marked by a counterflow lane.[7] This is presented as a 'one-way street, except for cyclists'. One-way streets that do not include contraflow for bicycles are rare and are usually only found as pairs of a single street (with very large median) that are too far apart to be presented as a single street. It is not uncommon for cyclists to fail to notice a one-way street that does include contraflow for bicycles, because they are too accustomed to all one-way streets including bicycles.

In the United Kingdom, it is standard since 2020 to encourage highway authorities to allow cycles to take a shorter and perhaps safer routes on narrow one-way residential streets. On streets with less than 1000 vehicles a day and a speed limit of 20mph, contraflow lanes do not require lane markings where, although appear on upright signage. As part of new or improved one-way road layouts, contraflow cycle lanes should be considered. [8]

In the United States, the town of Provincetown, Massachusetts on Cape Cod has long allowed cycling in both directions on its 3-mile long main street, Commercial Street. There is no marked cycle lane. This unusual condition required special state legislation in 1977 to give the local government permission to set its own rules for the street.[9][10]

Contraflow cycling is often assumed to be associated with higher accidents risks, but where it has been properly evaluated, contraflow cycling actually seems to reduce the accidents risk.[11]
800px-Cycle_contraflow_Rennes_2.jpg
 

Admiral Beez

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Signage and especially paint (as we see in examples of this in downtown west) should not be necessary. Just change the HTA so that bicycles are exempt from single lane one way streets and requiring that cars must yield space to oncoming bikes.
 
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DSC

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A City contractor is busy today putting up additional traffic light fixtures all along Mill Street and The Esplanade (so far they seem to have done to Lower Sherbourne). No doubt part of: https://www.toronto.ca/community-pe...de-mill-street/esplanade-mill-whats-proposed/

Phase 1, east of Lower Sherbourne Street is proposed to be installed toward the end of 2021 to maintain a cycling connection between the downtown and the waterfront during planned construction.

Phase 2 is proposed to begin west of Sherbourne Street in 2022. This allows for the planned removal of the St. Lawrence Market Tent.

For most of the corridor, road level, bi-directional cycle tracks with concrete curbs, paint and new signal timing is proposed to be implemented over the next two years.
 

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