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Cycling infrastructure (Separated bike lanes headed downtown)

W. K. Lis

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It upsets me that such streetscape plans suggested for a "downtown" neighbourhood cannot be applied to a "suburban" neighbourhood. Instead the "suburban" neighbourhood has streets with wide lanes, creating a want-to-be expressway running through a zoned "residential low-density" neighbourhood, with little regard for cyclists or pedestrians.

I think the title of thread should be expanded not just to "downtown", but to the entire "city" and even into the "905".
 

jelbana

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It upsets me that such streetscape plans suggested for a "downtown" neighbourhood cannot be applied to a "suburban" neighbourhood. Instead the "suburban" neighbourhood has streets with wide lanes, creating a want-to-be expressway running through a zoned "residential low-density" neighbourhood, with little regard for cyclists or pedestrians.

I think the title of thread should be expanded not just to "downtown", but to the entire "city" and even into the "905".


Indeed, the fact that Overlea Boulevard was the only one of the activeTO temporary COVID-19 bike lanes that was NOT implemented speaks to that.
 

DSC

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Not sure if this has been discussed here before but the City is moving ahead on bike lanes on both The Esplanade and Mill Street to create a 'through route' from Yonge to Bayview. While one can quibble about some of the details, I think the plan is basically sound There is a public consultation on 25th February between 6.30 and 8.30. See details of the plan and info about signing up for the meeting at toronto.ca/EsplanadeMill

Apart from concerns about enforcement of one-way only blocks on The Esplanade and maybe pushing more vehicles onto residential streets like George and Frederick, my cycling concern is the proposal to add a separate bike track through Parliament Square park NORTH of the existing shared pathway. This seems bizarre to me as it will create a big problem when this reaches Parliament Street. Probably better to move the bike path south of the pedestrians at the Berkeley/Hahn Place intersection.
 

W. K. Lis

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Meanwhile, outside of the old city of Toronto, where they consider bicycle infrastructure "recreational" and not "transportation"...


From link.
 

afransen

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What makes you say that? The suburbs are making similar, slow progress on improved cycling infrastructure.
 
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ear2ear

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Apart from concerns about enforcement of one-way only blocks on The Esplanade and maybe pushing more vehicles onto residential streets like George and Frederick, my cycling concern is the proposal to add a separate bike track through Parliament Square park NORTH of the existing shared pathway. This seems bizarre to me as it will create a big problem when this reaches Parliament Street. Probably better to move the bike path south of the pedestrians at the Berkeley/Hahn Place intersection.

My initial thoughts were similar to yours. However the more I looked at the diagrams, it became apparent to me that the design intention was to minimize cyclist-pedestrian crossings in that stretch. Assuming the majority of east-west foot traffic is on the south side of the Parliament and Mill St. intersection (between park/path and Distillery District), cyclists won't often cross paths with east-west pedestrians in the proposed configuration. The slight jog in the cycle track at Parliament seems unavoidable given the Mill St. reconfiguration, so best to keep some mode separation at that intersection. Hopefully there's some way finding and other design choices made that encourage pedestrians to that south side crossing too.

Admittedly though, I tend to stick to Front for my east-west cycling routes through the area, so maybe I'm overlooking something. But I agree that overall this looks like a great plan.
 

robmausser

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What makes you say that? The suburbs are more similar, slow progress on improved cycling infrastructure.

If the bike lane doesnt use up a lane previously meant for cars then its not a success for bicycle infrastructure! Death to cars! /s
 

W. K. Lis

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If the bike lane doesnt use up a lane previously meant for cars then its not a success for bicycle infrastructure! Death to cars! /s

Sure the right lanes downtown are NO STOPPING, but drivers still park there to get their emergency latte. Makes no difference if the lane is taken by parked automobiles or a bicycle lane.
 

Northern Light

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A reported headed to the next TRCA Board of Directors meeting on February 26th indicated that the tender has been issued to the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment for the Mid-Humber Gap Trail.

Report here:


From said report:

1614014285634.png


So we should know late next year or in early 2022 when the project will proceed.

Also from the report; and rather disappointing, is that it appears the decision has been made not take land from the Golf Course across the river; which could be done quite efficiently without compromising the course in any substantial way.

The result means that any trail will either be just above the water on a viaduct/boardwalk or hug and likely climb the steep slopes of the east river bank.

Also noted is that depending on the alignment chosen, it may include an on-road component (presumably on Weston Road); presumably, as a physically separated bi-directional path, but that is not clear at this time.

The cost range is 3.5M-9.5M depending on the route chosen and design choices.

1614014533835.png
 

robmausser

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In 2013, the City contacted TRCA to request assistance in planning and implementing a trail connection project to close the gap, via a multi-staged approach.

Man, some of this stuff takes forever...
 

H4F33Z

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Are you hoping 2021, will be an exciting year for cycling expansion, and new bike lanes. Well prepare to get your hopes down. It's not looking good. These are all the new bike lanes, cycle tracks, contraflows, and boulevard trails planned for this year. If you remember this map having more stuff, You would be correct! Most major routes got pushed back (in toronto fashion.) This map doesn't include sharrows, or bike lane upgrades. Only new installations. This map also doesn't include Yonge, as it's an ActiveTO installation which is a seperate initiative. It is planned for Summer 2021.

1614740641337.png
 

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