News   Feb 26, 2021
 431     0 
News   Feb 26, 2021
 936     0 
News   Feb 26, 2021
 1.8K     7 

Cycling infrastructure (Separated bike lanes headed downtown)

W. K. Lis

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
18,594
Reaction score
7,480
Location
Toronto, ON, CAN, Terra, Sol, Milky Way
There is a cycling path north of Eglinton Avenue. Except for the missing section over Allen Road.


From link.
 

H4F33Z

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 11, 2019
Messages
317
Reaction score
633
Location
Thorncliffe Park
There is a cycling path north of Eglinton Avenue. Except for the missing section over Allen Road.


From link.

That's not the point. Trails do not equal on-street cycling infrastructure. Trails are mainly used for recreation and is not on Eglinton. A gravel path has a different purpose than a vibrant main street filled with shops, restaurants and other buildings.

Cycle tracks directly on Eglinton will provide a safe route on the road that people want to ride on. It also provides an alternative for transit users to hop on to a bike instead of taking the train during busy times. Eglinton is a major corridor outlined in the 10-year cycling plan, and main street plan. Bike lanes usually provide a safer road for everyone, and Eglinton Connect's plan is to provide parking, raised cycle tracks, wider sidewalks, green and patio space all in one package.

1611605691599.png
 

afransen

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 22, 2007
Messages
3,753
Reaction score
2,038
Off-street trails aren't necessarily bad. They just need to be fairly direct (minimal unneeded meandering) and provide reasonable access to points of origin and destination. In some ways they are desirable because there are less conflicts with cars and thus safer/more comfortable.
 

W. K. Lis

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Dec 24, 2007
Messages
18,594
Reaction score
7,480
Location
Toronto, ON, CAN, Terra, Sol, Milky Way
That's not the point. Trails do not equal on-street cycling infrastructure. Trails are mainly used for recreation and is not on Eglinton. A gravel path has a different purpose than a vibrant main street filled with shops, restaurants and other buildings.

Cycle tracks directly on Eglinton will provide a safe route on the road that people want to ride on. It also provides an alternative for transit users to hop on to a bike instead of taking the train during busy times. Eglinton is a major corridor outlined in the 10-year cycling plan, and main street plan. Bike lanes usually provide a safer road for everyone, and Eglinton Connect's plan is to provide parking, raised cycle tracks, wider sidewalks, green and patio space all in one package.

View attachment 296228

Isn't that the same excuse given for not using the hydro corridor north of Finch Avenue for a LRT?
 

sche

Active Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 5, 2019
Messages
173
Reaction score
364
Off-street trails aren't necessarily bad. They just need to be fairly direct (minimal unneeded meandering) and provide reasonable access to points of origin and destination. In some ways they are desirable because there are less conflicts with cars and thus safer/more comfortable.
Off road multi use trails are great, but for them to be as useful as on-street cycling infrastructure they need to be paved, lit, maintained in the winter, and go to actual destinations. Needless to say, almost all Toronto trials don't meet that description.
^^^
If you go on Google Maps and look around the Netherlands, you see off-road bike trails all over the place. They are usually direct, often grade separated or have signal priority at crossings, and well integrated with the rest of the cycling network.

Really, the mentality with these off-road trails needs to just shift from being "recreational trails" to being real transportation routes. When we start recognizing these corridors as actual transportation assets, many things become no-brainers. Things like providing robust road crossing options (ahem, Beltline at Bathurst), direct routings (instead of meandering paths), separate paths for pedestrians and cyclists, and continuity over rail lines, river valleys, and highways. Pedestrian and cycling routes are really not that expensive compared to other projects.

Our trails in river valleys might always be purely recreational due to the topography. However, routes like the hydro corridors, the Belt Line, the path beside Eg West, and the W Toronto Raipath have real potential as commuter cycling highways (just the hydro corridors would connect NYCC, UTSC, York U, ECLRT, FWLRT, Kipling, Kennedy, Lawrence East, Finch, Finch West, and Old Cummer GO). They just don't perform as such right now because of poor design resulting from this recreational trail mentality.
 

afransen

Senior Member
Member Bio
Joined
Apr 22, 2007
Messages
3,753
Reaction score
2,038
Lighting is a big one. I have quite a bright light on my bike as some off-street trails are pitch black at night. Worse, I've had oncoming cyclists come right at me and I didn't see them until they were upon me (no lights, and a tiny reflector).

It kind of kills me that this stuff has largely been figured out but its 'not invented here', so we have to wait decades to see change that should be possible sooner. Never mind the tens of billions that will be invested over those intervening decades on inferior designs. I kind of laugh at the 'fashion bike lanes' you seen in marketing materials for new developments that don't actually look that usable, with car parking right on the lane for perfect dooring opportunities. Vancouver at least has a couple protected bike intersections, I'm not aware of any in Toronto. We pat ourselves on the back for having protected bike lanes. Most injuries and conflicts happen at intersections and we are still basically as bad as we were 20 years ago despite the improvements in mid block protection.
 

Northern Light

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
10,369
Reaction score
14,962
Location
Toronto/EY

DSC

Superstar
Member Bio
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Messages
12,216
Reaction score
8,483
Location
St Lawrence Market Area
A new link onto Lower Don trail:


Tender
Solicitation
number:
Doc2780898047
Commodity:Construction Services, Landscape Construction
Description:Request For Tender - Lower Don Trail Phase 2 Improvements
Ariba Public Posting: http://discovery.ariba.com/rfx/9618709

Posting Summary

The Work of this Contract involves the new sloping ramp structure, improvements to the existing Lower Don Trail, steel staircase connecting the Dundas Street Bridge to the Lower Don Trail and the East Path accessibility improvements. The Work includes all appurtenances, fixtures, equipment, systems, building and civil services and municipal connections, to the extent and as documented and elaborated in the Construction Drawings and in the Construction Specification Project Manual, which constitute a fundamental component of this Tender Package.
Issue date:January 20, 2021
Closing date:February 17, 2021
at 12:00 Noon
Pre-bid meeting:Site Meeting Info -

A Site Information Bulletin will be published as an Addenda ASAP in lieu of a Mandatory Site Meeting.
Buyer:Suits, Martin
Phone number:416-392-7172
Email:Martin.Suits@toronto.ca
Location:City Hall, 19th Floor West Tower
Client Division:Parks, Forestry & Recreation
 

Top