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Crosstown LRT | Metrolinx

TheTigerMaster

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This doesn’t make a ton of sense to me at all. Riders care about where the lines are taking them. The type of vehicles used to transport them is almost immaterial. I don’t care if it’s an LRV or helicopter transporting me, as long as it gets me to where I’m going

Under this system, commuters entering Don Mills Station will only know this is a bus/streetcar/LRT/subway station. Where this station will actually take you is unknowable until you’re inside the station complex.

Further, this appears to not take into account that there are dozens of entrances to stations across the region that might only provide access to a subset of the lines servicing any given station.
I really don’t understand why Metrolinx thinks it’s necessary to complicate things by imposing a second totally different wayfinding standard on the city that has nothing to do with the existing standard. The TTC already has a brand new wayfinding standard which by all accounts is working well for customers. Complaints I’ve seen about the TTC’s wayfinding has more to do with the inconsistency of its application (a lot of the legacy signage still remains), rather than problems with the design standard itself.

Now customers have to deal with Metrolinx’s poorly designed wayfinding system, on top of the legacy TTC system and the new TTC system. What a mess.

B35489BD-51B6-4661-923A-2DE811C2F9D3.png
 

Coolstar

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I don't understand why we're reinventing the wheel here. We had an excellent new wayfinding standard already done by the TTC. All those years developing the standard put to waste. The only thing that made sense from that article is replacing the TTCs CLRV streetcar logo with a new one which actually makes sense since the CLRVs were retired back in 2019. The ARTM in Montreal has done a far better job at this.

 
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TheTigerMaster

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I see the logic in it as this looks like a copy and paste of London's wayfinding standards. However, I agree that the transport modes iconography seem difficult to distinguish from a distance unlike TfL's roundel which are distinguishable through their colours.
I wonder how many of the designers involved in the creation of the design systems in Metrolinx have actually lived in Toronto for any significant portion of time. Both the station naming and the wayfinding standard appear to be a copy of the Transport for London system, with little regard for local customs. I specifically look to how Metrolinx has named many stations after neighbourhood names that see little real-world usage outside of official maps.

Just overall this whole design system seems poorly conceived and sloppily implemented. Metrolinx needs to do better than this. They’ve spent too much of our money for this poor level of quality to be acceptable.
 

EnviroTO

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idk about you guys but I always found mixed case harder to read especially on signage. Also mixed case looks really weird and awkward when placed on a banner especially on an entranceway.
Mixed case, if the right font, is easier to read because the letter shapes are more distinct with bdfhklt being taller and gjpqy going below the line. When capitalized letters are more visible it is only because they are massive.
 

W. K. Lis

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I wonder how many of the designers involved in the creation of the design systems in Metrolinx have actually lived in Toronto for any significant portion of time. Both the station naming and the wayfinding standard appear to be a copy of the Transport for London system, with little regard for local customs. I specifically look to how Metrolinx has named many stations after neighbourhood names that see little real-world usage outside of official maps.

Just overall this whole design system seems poorly conceived and sloppily implemented. Metrolinx needs to do better than this. They’ve spent too much of our money for this poor level of quality to be acceptable.
When the subway opened in Toronto in 1954, they used words. No pictographs, other than the TTC logo.

subway1.jpg
From link.

The logo itself has undergone many variations over the years.
 

robmausser

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Bit of an aside, but my favourite example of this is that in 2008, at a world electricity convention, the IEEE came out with a universal power outlet standard for the world to incorporate, Type N. The hope was to create a single standard that the world would use, negating the complicated mess of different plug types. Just two, one for 110v and one for 220v, very similar in standard.

Brazil at the time was looking for a new outlet to standardize the several different outlet types and voltages found around the country. So, they thought "hey, heres this new universal standard outlet that the world is going to use, lets jump on this and be early adopters, but then we will be poised to be compatible with this new world standard." Rather than use the European outlet type, (Type C) which is really the most widely adopted.

As of 2021 the number of countries using the new universal world stanard type N plug: One. Brazil.
 

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