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Crosstown LRT | Metrolinx

mdu

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The YRT may be chronically underfunded in terms of opex, but the shelters on the Viva BRTs are much better than these. Longer canopy, heated waiting area, and actually look fairly stylish.
 

W. K. Lis

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As someone who has frequently used the heat lamps on iON in waterloo, they don't do jack ****. You're better off with higher frequency trains and just biting the bullet of waiting in the cold for 2-3 minutes.
Some help in keeping fast food warm though.


From link.
 

toronto647

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General Question for anyone to answer - Do you think the Crosstown LRT will open by December 2022. If Yes Why? If no, Why and When do you think so?
 

crs1026

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^I’m not sure more people is the answer. The people who fit out the tunnels and systems are not the same trades as the people who are dealing with finishing the excavating, form and rebar work, and concrete pours. The question is, when will those fit-out trades have adequate access to the tunnels and stations to do the next phase of the work. Until we have all station entrances complete and secure, only so much can get done inside. Many stations are still at the “playing with dirt” stage so there are vulnerabilities beyond Cedarvale and Eglinton-Yonge.

- Paul
 

TheTigerMaster

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General Question for anyone to answer - Do you think the Crosstown LRT will open by December 2022. If Yes Why? If no, Why and When do you think so?
I think late 2022/early 2023 is a realistic timeline for completion.

From my observations, subway projects typically have underground station structures completed about two years prior to revenue service, to allow time for the installation of elevators, escalators, HVAC and other systems installation. If by the end of the year, the structures for Cedervale and Yonge and all the other stations aren't completed, I'd say the December 2021 deadline is at risk.
 

Reecemartin

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The YRT may be chronically underfunded in terms of opex, but the shelters on the Viva BRTs are much better than these. Longer canopy, heated waiting area, and actually look fairly stylish.
Good! You'll be waiting 30 minutes! :D
 

toronto647

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I think late 2022/early 2023 is a realistic timeline for completion.

From my observations, subway projects typically have underground station structures completed about two years prior to revenue service, to allow time for the installation of elevators, escalators, HVAC and other systems installation. If by the end of the year, the structures for Cedervale and Yonge and all the other stations aren't completed, I'd say the December 2021 deadline is at risk.
In your opinion of course... Would it be fair to say 100% ready by December 2023 forsure?
 

Streety McCarface

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Those shelters will be tagged in no time. Probably with the slogan: "A Place To Grow"
To be fair, it's one of the main lines in the song A Place to Stand, a Place to Grow, which is Ontario's unofficial anthem. Not a fan of Ford's meddling, but it's quite a fitting slogan for Ontario.
 

TheTigerMaster

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This NYT article is about the flawed delivery of the O-Train in Ottawa. However, it's directly related to the Crosstown LRT, as SNC-Lavalin is delivering the ECLRT as part of the P3 consortium.

A few excerpts for those too lazy to click the link, but you really should check out the full article.

SNC-Lavalin Is the Talk of Ottawa Again, if in a Very Different Context

But almost from opening day, a slew of problems appeared. Somehow, passengers holding doors open — a not approved but common practice found on nearly every transit system — crippled trains. Parts of trains, including a door, fell off, leading to other disruptions. The system used by the trains, made by the French-owned company Alstom, to pull electricity from overhead wires sometimes creates terrifyingly loud and bright electrical arcsbefore shutting down. Long sections of that wiring have also collapsed. Train control system and computer failures have brought traffic to a halt. The steel wheels on cars developed flat spots, forcing their removal from service. Switches froze when winter came.
The result of all of this is that only 13 trains are in service most of the time, rather than the promised 15. Some days it’s much worse. Last week only six trains were running during one rush-hour period; some rush hours have had no service.
...
building and construction and construction financing of Ottawa’s system was turned over to a specially created company owned by ACS Infrastructure, a Spanish engineering company; Ellis-Don, a construction company based in Mississauga, Ontario; and SNC-Lavalin, the Montreal-based engineering company that was the talk of Ottawa for other reasonsthis time last year. Those three companies also received a second contract from the city to maintain the system for the next 30 years.
...
SNC-Lavalin, ACS and Ellis-Don are also among the members of a different public-private partnership building an extensive light rail line in Toronto. Last month that project announced a major delay in opening.
...​
failure of the private vendors to quickly resolve the problems in Ottawa is puzzling particularly given that the city has refused to pay the consortium millions of dollars in monthly maintenance fees and that the city is attempting to bill the consortium for the cost of things like the parallel bus service — factors that, according to theory, should prompt swift action.​
...
Ottawa, Professor Siemiatycki said, is also demonstrating another drawback of many public-private deals: secrecy. Confidentiality clauses in contracts meant that as the opening was repeatedly delayed, the contractors’ consortium stayed largely silent. More recently, its maintenance company has offered some public comments, but it is hardly a model of transparency. The municipal transit service has been left to do the talking.
 

TheTigerMaster

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SNC-Lavalin Is the Talk of Ottawa Again, if in a Very Different Context
I'm terrified that the Crosstown LRT is destined to go down the same path as the O-Train. Very similar DBFM contracts, involving SNC, are being utilized to deliver both projects. And the secrecy and confidentiality surrounding the ECLRT (and also the Ontario Line) should look very familiar to all of us.

Given how hastily Crosslinx is attempting to deliver the Crosstown, I really have no expectation that they'll be delivering a quality product. Nor do I have any expectation that Metrolinx will be holding their feet to the fire.
 

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