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Crosstown LRT | Metrolinx

Richard White

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Actually, people have always thought Metro as being synonymous with Toronto. Even signs on the 401 always signed Metro as if it were one city. While places like Cambridge and Vaughan, which have been amalgamated for decades, are still seen a collection of distinct places (especially the latter). Even Hamilton which has always had a city-and-suburbs relationship, is psychologically disunited.
That's because for years it was called Metropolitan Toronto. Everything from Metropolitan Toronto Police to Metropolitan Toronto Zoo. It was 6 cities but it functioned as one so really.. you were headed to Toronto.
 

TheTigerMaster

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I think this also further drives the point home that Toronto as a single-tier city with only 1 council just doesn't work. However this amalgmation horse has been thoroughly beaten into the ground I see no end in site. Its no wonder why some of the worlds most successful cities tend to be two-tiered or atleast have some sort of regional authority above to handle the big things. The job of a City Councillor is to focus on the local level issues, the problem is that Toronto City Council is expected to perform the jobs of both a lower and upper tier municipality. This would be fine if the City was a single entity from the start, but it's not. The City isn't single tier by nature, but by law and while we can think we are one unified city, the truth is we are still 6 at our core, each with its own culture, and expecting a single Council to be able to handle this is stupid. The obvious solution would be to go back to the former Metro system and let local Councillors deal with the local stuff, while the Metro Councillors deal with the bigger regional stuff like you see in many major cities around the world; however we know the Liberals after 10+ years wouldn't do it, we know the Conservatives certainty won't because they believe they can do no wrong so nothing will change.
If Toronto's system of governance were applied to a similarly sized province, say Alberta, MPPs would be in charge of running the province, while also worrying about the placement of park benches in any random neighbourhood park.
 

rbt

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The city council passed a hotel tax and a DVP toll that the province then stepped in and blocked.
I realize this is semantics, but technically that authority has never been granted to Toronto so the province did not block it, they said "no" to the request for the authority to do so. They did, however, give Toronto $170M/year which is roughly equal to the revenue the proposed toll was expected to generate. Other municipalities combined received $130M/year based on a ridership formula.

Kid asks to borrow the car and the parent says no, but buys them and their siblings a taxi ride to the desired destination instead.
 

White Pine

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I realize this is semantics, but technically that authority has never been granted to Toronto so the province did not block it, they said "no" to the request for the authority to do so. They did, however, give Toronto $170M/year which is roughly equal to the revenue the proposed toll was expected to generate. Other municipalities combined received $130M/year based on a ridership formula.

Kid asks to borrow the car and the parent says no, but buys them and their siblings a taxi ride to the desired destination instead.
Somebody told me that Toronto did get the authority to impose tolls. Didn't hear anything about hotels though. I think they can use alcohol/tobacco taxes, movie taxes, vehicle registration, billboard taxes, and a couple of other things which I forget.
 

rbt

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Somebody told me that Toronto did get the authority to impose tolls.
That's incorrect. It was speculated that Toronto should be allowed to toll the roadway they owned, but that isn't something they can actually do.

Didn't hear anything about hotels though.
Toronto implemented a mandatory 4% hotel tax on April 1st 2018. Prior to that it was a volunteer tax paid by most major hotels as it funded regional marketing that they benefit from.
 

Reecemartin

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View into the pit infront of Eglinton West Station from Saturday night. Subway tunnel running on the left.
View attachment 208135View attachment 208136
Especially at Yonge will they do any work to repair the subway tunnel from the outside? Seems like a good and rare opportunity for some structural repairs and improvements after so many years of service.

TBH, they way it read was that Metrolinx upended the Relief Line, not Ford. It was presented as something that Metrolinx presented to Ford and he ok'd it. OTW, it's likely we would have had the status quo with the relief line. Honestly, I expect a subway to be built for the Ontario line. I believe Metrolinx is doing an RFQ with specific performance requirements. Industry will likely come back and say you need to build a subway.
If by a subway you mean something like the Skytrain or REM, clearly it's not going to be the Canada Line but, if you made the trains on the Canada Line twice as long and added more stations entrances and exits well then you're actually not looking bad. And the capacity would be pretty high. In fact, that meets almost all the mentioned specs: 80m starting upgradeable to 100m platforms, roughly 30,000 ppdph max capacity, etc.

Subway is a vague term, it was always going to be a metro line thing, but the question is how long are the trains and what are the frequency. Both should be high, but it sounds like train length might be low. Other than that, automated or not is less relevant

Given that this is likely to be a p3, then brace for shorter trains and 80m platforms. That's what industry will say, not subway in the traditional sense. Think of all recent p3s in Canada, the Canada line, the Confederation line and the REM. All use smaller trains and make up for it with high frequencies at launch, that's because that's the most cost effective (read cheap) way to build. But when you can't make the frequency the system fails spectacularly as happened last week in Ottawa.

Compare to the subway, which is running high frequencies and long trains , and it's only relying on frequency now 50 years later as it's at its design limit. It didn't launch that way but a new p3 line will look a lot like Vancouver, Ottawa, and Montreal's recent projects rather than the Sheppard subway
To be honest though, that doesn't sound all too bad. The Sheppard subway is grossly overbuilt at least for what is needed there today, and that extra money meant not buying other things that would have made a more material impact sooner. I'd also point out that the Skytrain actually operates down to sub 2 minute headways and doesn't have drivers at all and isn't too frequently dealing with Ottawa level issues (especially with Translinks improved mnagement) it's also much older. I'd chalk Ottawas situation up to teething, inexperienced management, and kinda bad trains.

I think EOD 80m - 100m is a pretty good medium. Not laughably small like the Canada Line, but still not so large that you might as well put the money elsewhere like other lines that actually mean improved coverage.

It actually was ala my source, apparently one of those laser sensors that are set up to ensure things aren't shifting was set off falsely.
 

Johnny Au

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I think this also further drives the point home that Toronto as a single-tier city with only 1 council just doesn't work. However this amalgmation horse has been thoroughly beaten into the ground I see no end in site. Its no wonder why some of the worlds most successful cities tend to be two-tiered or atleast have some sort of regional authority above to handle the big things. The job of a City Councillor is to focus on the local level issues, the problem is that Toronto City Council is expected to perform the jobs of both a lower and upper tier municipality. This would be fine if the City was a single entity from the start, but it's not. The City isn't single tier by nature, but by law and while we can think we are one unified city, the truth is we are still 6 at our core, each with its own culture, and expecting a single Council to be able to handle this is stupid. The obvious solution would be to go back to the former Metro system and let local Councillors deal with the local stuff, while the Metro Councillors deal with the bigger regional stuff like you see in many major cities around the world; however we know the Liberals after 10+ years wouldn't do it, we know the Conservatives certainty won't because they believe they can do no wrong so nothing will change.
It is time Toronto severs itself from Ontario and become its own province. This way, Toronto can control its own destiny.

Ontario can have a new capital.
 

drum118

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New York City has the authority, and does, to impose a sales tax and an income tax. Toronto has to beg the province.
Every city and state we have gone to had hotel fees added to our bill for the city and state.
 

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