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Bathurst Quay Revitalization: Canada Malting Silos, Ireland Pk, Waterfront Promenade (was Metronome)

bowen

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Wow, you guys really don’t miss anything. That award panel report only went live this morning.

Hoping for an early October mobilization for both the silo rehab project, and the Corleck building by Canada Ireland Foundation. And we’re presenting revised landscape concept plans to our Stakeholder Advisory Committee next week, shortly after which materials will be available on-line.

Finally, we’re working out logistics for a mock up of the up-lighting scheme for the malting silos, which is being designed by Ombrages (our lighting design sub to PFS Studio). Happy to post those details here should anyone wish to go down and see the test on site in person. Testing position, colour, luminosity, etc.
Contract award for the silo rehab was approved yesterday. We're scheduling a kick-off site meeting with our contractor next week, with mobilization set to begin early October. Another puzzle piece falling into place. We're excited to get started.

Also, Wednesday, September 29 at 8pm is confirmed for our up-lighting demonstration for the malting silos. If interested, please come down and check out the test alongside our team and other invited project stakeholders and tell us what you think. Also, I don't want to oversell this. We'll have two fixtures set up at the southwest corner of the south silo to allow us to test out accuracy of our photometric study, and to experiment with location, colours, brightness, etc. So not a complete mock-up, but will be a good indication of what to expect when the full installation (planned for the west, south and east side of the south silo) goes ahead next year as part of the public plaza construction.
 

bowen

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FYI: tonight our team did a dry-run of tomorrow's silo lighting demo . It looks amazing. Check out Jonathan Gazze's instagram and the Waterfront BIA's social media tomorrow for photos. And come check it out in person Wednesday evening at 8pm!

 

irishboy

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i was in the area so dropped by to check out the light test. it looks great. you can really see the potential that these silos can bring this area with effective lighting. kudos to all involved
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and if they can get a restaurant and/or patio on top of these silos, it would have one of the nicest views in the city.

E1A21248-02C1-4EB8-921E-244B3C5F4700.jpeg
 

thenewguy

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i was in the area so dropped by to check out the light test. it looks great. you can really see the potential that these silos can bring this area with effective lighting. kudos to all involved View attachment 352281View attachment 352282View attachment 352283

and if they can get a restaurant and/or patio on top of these silos, it would have one of the nicest views in the city.

View attachment 352284
If I get a vote - I want a Marina Sands cantilevered swimming platform!
 

kotsy

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I do wonder how well the silos would insulate sound. Something like Printworks/Drumsheds in Toronto would be fantastic (as long as it's not run by Muzik/the Rebel group) and the either of the silos would be the perfect venue for it.


That would be outstanding! I've been very anxious to check out Printworks.
 

daniel_kryz

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Just some feedback... I really like this project and am so inspired by how well it's moving along. My concern is that the seating along the water's edge is just blocks of concrete. Isn't it better to have a consistent identity along the waterfront? My idea is to replace the concrete seats with benches found in places like the East Bayfront Water's Edge or Central Queens Quay, designed by West 8 and DTAH.

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bowen

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Just some feedback... I really like this project and am so inspired by how well it's moving along. My concern is that the seating along the water's edge is just blocks of concrete. Isn't it better to have a consistent identity along the waterfront? My idea is to replace the concrete seats with benches found in places like the East Bayfront Water's Edge or Central Queens Quay, designed by West 8 and DTAH.

View attachment 356120View attachment 356121
Hey Daniel, thanks for your support for this project and for your feedback. I'm glad to answer this question.

That particular bench design is found in three other central waterfront locations: 1) the nearest is the immediately adjacent Portland Slip promenade, which uses timber that looks fantastic, though the material has not aged terribly well and the benches are splitting in several areas; 2) granite benches around the perimeter of Harbourfront's Marina Four slip; and 3) granite benches at the perimeter of the York Street slip at Queen's Quay Terminal.

We opted for solid granite benches here (same as the Marina Four and York Street slips) for both durability, and to pick up some of the texture and colour of the limestone in Ireland Park. Further, what works well about this simple design is the flexibility to face in any direction, ie towards the water, the silos/Ireland Park, and/or to straddle the bench and directly face someone you're sitting with. This so far is working as we had hoped, given the many different ways people are already using this new space (even in spite of much work left to do and actively underway on this site).

And there is much more seating on the way. In fact, we have set a goal for this project (as informed by a lot of stakeholder feedback) to provide an abundance of seating options - fixed and moveable, shaded and exposed, at grade and slightly elevated, and multiple orientations (ie an ability to choose to face the water, the silos, Ireland Park, and/or the Corleck). And the combination of wood and concrete materials for those additional seating options will complement the granite bench and help diversify the material palette.

Finally, as for consistency with the West 8/DTAH design, we are relying on the 'maple leaf mosaic' already completed in the new Western Channel promenade to provide that continuity of identity and language. To that end, we used Trinity Masonry for the granite cobble install (who have done much of this work throughout the central waterfront), and retained DTAH for inspection and quality control, to ensure 100% consistency with the original West 8/DTAH/WT mosaic design (which at least in my personal view is really the backbone of the central waterfront's public realm identity that WT has been creating; more so than a need to maintain absolute and rigid consistency with benches and/or lamp standards).

Hoping that helps explain some of the thinking and decision-making here. And thanks again for reaching out on this!
 

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bowen

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Hey Daniel, thanks for your support for this project and for your feedback. I'm glad to answer this question.

That particular bench design is found in three other central waterfront locations: 1) the nearest is the immediately adjacent Portland Slip promenade, which uses timber that looks fantastic, though the material has not aged terribly well and the benches are splitting in several areas; 2) granite benches around the perimeter of Harbourfront's Marina Four slip; and 3) granite benches at the perimeter of the York Street slip at Queen's Quay Terminal.

We opted for solid granite benches here (same as the Marina Four and York Street slips) for both durability, and to pick up some of the texture and colour of the limestone in Ireland Park. Further, what works well about this simple design is the flexibility to face in any direction, ie towards the water, the silos/Ireland Park, and/or to straddle the bench and directly face someone you're sitting with. This so far is working as we had hoped, given the many different ways people are already using this new space (even in spite of much work left to do and actively underway on this site).

And there is much more seating on the way. In fact, we have set a goal for this project (as informed by a lot of stakeholder feedback) to provide an abundance of seating options - fixed and moveable, shaded and exposed, at grade and slightly elevated, and multiple orientations (ie an ability to choose to face the water, the silos, Ireland Park, and/or the Corleck). And the combination of wood and concrete materials for those additional seating options will complement the granite bench and help diversify the material palette.

Finally, as for consistency with the West 8/DTAH design, we are relying on the 'maple leaf mosaic' already completed in the new Western Channel promenade to provide that continuity of identity and language. To that end, we used Trinity Masonry for the granite cobble install (who have done much of this work throughout the central waterfront), and retained DTAH for inspection and quality control, to ensure 100% consistency with the original West 8/DTAH/WT mosaic design (which at least in my personal view is really the backbone of the central waterfront's public realm identity that WT has been creating; more so than a need to maintain absolute and rigid consistency with benches and/or lamp standards).

Hoping that helps explain some of the thinking and decision-making here. And thanks again for reaching out on this!
Hmm. Had attached some photos to my reply that didn't show up. Trying again.
Central plaza view.jpg
CROPPED SOUTH TERRACE.jpg
New waterfront plaza on the Toronto waterfront's Canada Malting property_cropped.jpg
Salsa dancing on new Western Channel Promenade_June 2021.jpg
 

daniel_kryz

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Hey Daniel, thanks for your support for this project and for your feedback. I'm glad to answer this question.

That particular bench design is found in three other central waterfront locations: 1) the nearest is the immediately adjacent Portland Slip promenade, which uses timber that looks fantastic, though the material has not aged terribly well and the benches are splitting in several areas; 2) granite benches around the perimeter of Harbourfront's Marina Four slip; and 3) granite benches at the perimeter of the York Street slip at Queen's Quay Terminal.

We opted for solid granite benches here (same as the Marina Four and York Street slips) for both durability, and to pick up some of the texture and colour of the limestone in Ireland Park. Further, what works well about this simple design is the flexibility to face in any direction, ie towards the water, the silos/Ireland Park, and/or to straddle the bench and directly face someone you're sitting with. This so far is working as we had hoped, given the many different ways people are already using this new space (even in spite of much work left to do and actively underway on this site).

And there is much more seating on the way. In fact, we have set a goal for this project (as informed by a lot of stakeholder feedback) to provide an abundance of seating options - fixed and moveable, shaded and exposed, at grade and slightly elevated, and multiple orientations (ie an ability to choose to face the water, the silos, Ireland Park, and/or the Corleck). And the combination of wood and concrete materials for those additional seating options will complement the granite bench and help diversify the material palette.

Finally, as for consistency with the West 8/DTAH design, we are relying on the 'maple leaf mosaic' already completed in the new Western Channel promenade to provide that continuity of identity and language. To that end, we used Trinity Masonry for the granite cobble install (who have done much of this work throughout the central waterfront), and retained DTAH for inspection and quality control, to ensure 100% consistency with the original West 8/DTAH/WT mosaic design (which at least in my personal view is really the backbone of the central waterfront's public realm identity that WT has been creating; more so than a need to maintain absolute and rigid consistency with benches and/or lamp standards).

Hoping that helps explain some of the thinking and decision-making here. And thanks again for reaching out on this!
Thank you for your thorough and informative reply.

I agree that we should have seating that allows people to face any direction. For that, I would suggest using the West 8 bench that doesn't have back support (as seen in my first image). I respect your vision, but I just think that the West 8 + DTAH design language is very poetic and I wouldn't want to see a simplification in our waterfront's identity. The concrete option works well but, personally, I think it slightly reduces the sense of place of this project.

I love the dark stone seating, because it adds to this site's unique identity. I think the timber deck and the seating around the plaza are also great and complementary to the waterfront's identity. But I always envisioned the poetic benches as being a cross-cutting feature for every part of the Water's Edge, just as the wavedecks are in present and future conditions of Queens Quay. I support your commitment to continuing the maple leaf mosaic and I'm very impressed by your retention of DTAH for quality control! In terms of lighting, I am actually pretty disappointed that the signature 'Olivio' lights aren't being used in every project... and the fact that Toronto Hydro is pushing back against its use. I think that they look very neat with the timber pole and overall elegance that they evoke, so I wouldn't be supportive of different standards or utilitarian lamps. I support artistic creativity, but I am pretty worried that all the different landscape architects won't respect the basic elements that tie everything together, causing the district as a whole to feel messy and inharmonious. For example, the water's edge for the new Villiers Island Promontory Park won't even have the maple leaf mosaic and will instead opt for grey paver stones. The streets will just feature standard concrete sidewalks. That's the kind of thing I'm worried about. We should have unique design, but let's not forget about the overall identity and quality that we're trying to create!

It's a difference in opinion, of course, and I am nevertheless very excited to see the upcoming transformation. I remember biking here with my family when they said the silos are an eyesore and should be demolished. I'm so happy that we're using them to make something special, because much of what we think is worthless can actually become amazing if the right planning & design work is done. I'm so happy to see people dancing on the water's edge and how it's an example of the public realm encouraging people to be spontaneous!

Even though we may not agree about everything, it's okay. Design is subjective and people have different tastes. We still have the same aspirations for our waterfront and certainly not some out-of-touch 1950s vision. I'm excited for the future, and I encourage you to continue building a spectacular waterfront! :)
 
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evandyk

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We often take a bike ride along that stretch of the waterfront with the toddler on the back. We get out and play on the wave decks, check out the fire engine boat, relax in HTO park, etc. It's always a disappointment when you round the silos and have to get off your bike to trudge up to QQ between the silos and the airport. Looking forward to this moving along.

Though it's often a challenge to get this far along the waterfront because as soon as we get near Simcoe, the toddler usually insists on going to Roundhouse Park to see the trains.
 

AlbertC

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City of Toronto launches next phase of the Bathurst Quay waterfront revitalization plan


Nov 2, 2021

Today, Mayor John Tory was joined by Councillor Joe Cressy (Spadina-Fort York), Robert Kearns, Chair and Founder of the Canada Ireland Foundation, and Dr. Eamonn McKee, Ambassador of Ireland to Canada, for a special ground-breaking event to launch phase two construction of the Bathurst Quay Neighbourhood Plan (BQNP).

As part of the event, project partners and stakeholders gathered to officially open a new water’s edge promenade and rebuilt dockwall along the central waterfront’s Western Channel. As part of the announcement, the City of Toronto also officially launched the next construction phase for the BQNP, which includes the transformation of a vacant office building into a new waterfront arts and cultural hub, and rehabilitation and restoration of the heritage-designated Canada Malting silos.

Since the project was approved by City Council in 2017, the City has been leading a multi-project, multi-partner effort, including multiple City divisions, with funding and project delivery from external partners such as the Canada Ireland Foundation, Ports Toronto, the Waterfront BIA, Toronto District School Board and the Waterfront Neighbourhood Centre. The project will ultimately bring improvements to the surrounding Bathurst Quay neighbourhood, as well as to the historic Canada Malting property.

The first phase of construction for the BQNP project broke ground in October 2019 and was completed in early 2021. That phase delivered needed environmental approvals and remediation, more space for public use by working to reduce the footprint of Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, critical dockwall reconstruction and a new water’s edge public promenade along the south edge of the property.

The next phase of construction will begin this fall and includes two significant revitalization projects, both expected to be complete by 2023:

  • Rehabilitating and restoring the heritage-designated Canada Malting silos. This work includes creating a pedestrian “portal” through the silos, containing an interpretive installation on the history and significance of these heritage-designated structures, as well as enabling investments (such as restored hydro connection, water-proofing, and other repairs) in the structures to support their future planned re-use and activation.
  • Repurposing a derelict office building on the site into the “Corleck Building” — a new waterfront hub for arts and culture to be operated by the non-profit Canada Ireland Foundation, a long-standing partner to the City in creating commemorative parks and open spaces.
The third and final construction phase – set to begin in summer 2022 – will deliver a significant new waterfront plaza on the malting property that will include seating areas by the water’s edge, purposefully-designed spaces for hosting occasional special events, and ambient lighting that can transform the malting silos into iconic waterfront beacons. The final public realm design will also include a new parkette and public art mural on nearby Eireann Quay, to connect each of the Bathurst Quay projects to each other, to the Bathurst Quay neighbourhood, and to the water’s edge.

Learn more about the Bathurst Quay Neighbourhood Plan here

Quotes:

“This Bathurst Quay waterfront project has been an enormous undertaking dating back many years. I am thrilled about the progress that’s been made so far and applaud the efforts made by all of our partners who all share the same goal of improving our city’s waterfront. While we move forward in our next phase of construction, residents and visitors are able to continue to enjoy many parts of our beloved waterfront including new and improved facilities.”

– Mayor John Tory

“Our ongoing revitalization work is about opening up access to our city’s waterfront, and creating new, dynamic public spaces. The new water’s edge promenade and rebuilt dockwall at Bathurst Quay have opened up opportunities for community space, which will only be increased as we begin the transformation on an empty office building into a new arts and cultural hub. Along with the restoration of the historic Canada Malting silos, the City of Toronto and our local partners — especially the Canada Ireland Foundation, the Bathurst Quay Neighbourhood Association, The Waterfront BIA, TDSB and Ports Toronto – are helping to transform Bathurst Quay into a vibrant waterfront destination.”

– Councillor Joe Cressy (Spadina-Fort York)

“When the Corleck Building opens in spring 2023, it will become a vibrant hub for arts, culture and heritage on Toronto’s waterfront. The Corleck Building will present new opportunities for the Irish-Canadian community to explore its deep roots and to engage with the many diverse cultures that enrich the city today. The Canada Ireland Foundation is grateful to the City of Toronto for the tremendous ongoing partnership, beginning with the creation of Ireland Park in 2007, and continuing with the opening of Grasett Park earlier this year — and now with the development of The Corleck Building and the revitalization of Eireann Quay.”

– Robert Kearns, Founder & Chair of the Canada Ireland Foundation

“The Embassy of Ireland is delighted to support and be a part of the renovation and transformation of the Corleck building. Once completed, it will be an invaluable asset in representing the Irish in Canada and the strong bonds that connect Ireland and Canada. Those bonds are deeply embedded in our mutual histories and national narratives, providing a wealth of material for the programs and exhibitions at the Corleck. The Canada Ireland Foundation is to be commended for its work on Ireland Park and Grasett Park. Where those rightly recall and honour our history and beginnings in the city of Toronto, this new project looks to the future and the vitality of the links between Ireland and Canada today.”
 

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