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AODA on individual condo units?

tripwire

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Hey everyone, I'm having my condo PDI very soon but got notified by the builder that the city dictated that my unit (and several others) has to be made "accessible" per AODA and they have turned the master bedroom door to an automatic one (with the push button to open on both sides - hallway and in the room itself). Now, I can understand making X percentage of units accessible in apartments, hotels, senior homes, etc. But this is the first I've heard being imposed in privately purchased residential units?! Apparently the builder had to comply to get release for occupancy.

It just seems like a very poorly thought out decision, as AODA compliance should be planned out in the design/architect phase, not randomly imposed near the end with hacked solutions. I mean, the automatic door does piddly; and because they mandated the door to swing the opposite way, it now actually blocks access to the ensuite bathroom. Honestly, I'm switching between facepalm and table-flipping emotions.

Is the X percentage of privately purchased condo units must be AODA (after it's been designed and in construction) really a thing? I'm trying to get more information from the builder, but is there any recourse to appeal?
 

DSC

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Hey everyone, I'm having my condo PDI very soon but got notified by the builder that the city dictated that my unit (and several others) has to be made "accessible" per AODA and they have turned the master bedroom door to an automatic one (with the push button to open on both sides - hallway and in the room itself). Now, I can understand making X percentage of units accessible in apartments, hotels, senior homes, etc. But this is the first I've heard being imposed in privately purchased residential units?! Apparently the builder had to comply to get release for occupancy.

It just seems like a very poorly thought out decision, as AODA compliance should be planned out in the design/architect phase, not randomly imposed near the end with hacked solutions. I mean, the automatic door does piddly; and because they mandated the door to swing the opposite way, it now actually blocks access to the ensuite bathroom. Honestly, I'm switching between facepalm and table-flipping emotions.

Is the X percentage of privately purchased condo units must be AODA (after it's been designed and in construction) really a thing? I'm trying to get more information from the builder, but is there any recourse to appeal?
Though I have certainly seen buildings being approved with some AODA compliant Units, I have never heard of them suddenly 'appearing' at the last minute. From your posting I assume YOU are not disabled so making your Unit AODA compliant is not helping anyone but simply 'checking-off boxes'. For a Unit to be AODA compliant I suspect there is far more than just automatic openers, door widths are often a problem as is sink and counter height.

I hope you used your own agent and/or lawyer. You need to talk to them ASAP. Let us know what happens, it IS weird!
 

tripwire

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So we got good news from the builder - they were able to change the automatic master door to a regular one, but will still have to keep it swinging inwards to the bedroom - which we are totally fine with and are ecstatic that this is resolved. Apparently it wasn't about being full AODA compliance, but being barrier-free which from my very limited understanding is a smaller subset? https://www.ontario.ca/page/accessibility-ontarios-building-code

Apartment suites

At least 15% of suites within a multi-unit residential building must be designed with basic accessibility features such as a barrier-free path of travel and doorway into the:
  • kitchen
  • bedroom
  • living room
  • full bathroom
Suites with accessibility features must be distributed throughout the building and represent the types and sizes of suites available in the building. For example, if a building has 1 and 2 bedroom suites, accessibility features must be available for both types.

I'm still confused as to how this decision could happen so last minute, and honestly, we didn't hear *anything* about this when we were purchasing. I always thought that this percentage requirement for suite internals only applied to apartment (rental) buildings, hotels, etc.
 
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