Diamond Corp. and Tricon Capital made a big splash in 2017 with their proposal for 8 and 26-storey buildings just across from North Toronto Station (now the Summerhill LCBO). Designed by Copenhagen's COBE Architects, the proposed rental building at Yonge and Scrivener Square— and dubbed Scrivener Court—has since evolved following public consultation and and feedback from Toronto Planning. Despite an appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board for lack of a decision by City Council, a resubmission to the City earlier the month now seeks zoning amendments for a tweaked and scaled-back version of the original proposal.

Scrivener Court, Diamond Corp, Tricon, COBE, Claude Cormier, Toronto2017 and 2018 iterations of Scrivener Court, images via submission to City of Toronto

This new version incorporates significant alterations to the massing, with an overall reduction in height and a consolidation of the 8 and 26-storey volumes into a single 21-storey tower mass with several stepbacks along the way. This has resulted in the previously-proposed 97-metre height dropping down to 85.4 metres.

Scrivener Court, Diamond Corp, Tricon, COBE, Claude Cormier, TorontoFacing southeast to Scrivener Court, image via submission to City of Toronto

New renderings show that the plan's exterior expression has been simplified while retaining the basics of avant-garde style that made the initial proposal such a hit. Scrivener Court is proposed to be clad in glazed white terracotta 'lamellas' and aluminum framing around the windows. The lower levels retain the brick finishes seen on the previous version, but with stepbacks adjusted to be more in scale with the existing context, specifically that of the heritage buildings where the food merchants popularly known as the 'Five Thieves' are located.

Scrivener Court, Diamond Corp, Tricon, COBE, Claude Cormier, TorontoFacing northeast to Scrivener Court, image via submission to City of Toronto

One stumbling block in the previous plan was the loss of a green space at Yonge and Scrivener Square. This has been addressed in the latest plan with an ambitious plan by Claude Cormier + Associés, proposing a public space with cohesive landscaping that would reach across Scrivener Square and include the forecourt of the former North Toronto Station/current Summerhill LCBO. A large circular granite band of 1x1-metre slabs surrounding granite cobble pavers of multiple sizes would encompass both sides of Scrivener Square and the road between. A Cormier-designed courtyard at the interior of the site would form a dialogue between the development's public and private outdoor realm.

Scrivener Court, Diamond Corp, Tricon, COBE, Claude Cormier, TorontoFacing east to Scrivener Court, image via submission to City of Toronto

The building is now proposed with a gross floor area (GFA) of 23,530 m², consisting primarily of residential space, at 19,807 m². This space is spread across 141 units in a mix of 49 one bedrooms (35% of total), 85 two-bedrooms (60% of total), and 8 three-bedrooms (5% of total). The remaining area includes 3,626 m² of non-residential space, and 97 m² of TTC-related uses.

Scrivener Court, Diamond Corp, Tricon, COBE, Claude Cormier, TorontoFacing south to Scrivener Court, image via submission to City of Toronto

The project site has been identified as a preferred location for Summerhill Subway Station's proposed second exit, with a 97 m² rough-in for a new entrance facing the square. Along with the convenience, the second access point would fulfill the TTC's commitment to improving the safety on the system by adding second exits to stations without them.

The Scrivener Court building is proposed with a four-level underground garage containing 137 spaces, with 93 for residents and 44 visitor/commercial spaces. Parking for 164 bicycles would be included across the development, with 135 long-term spaces (127 resident and 8 visitor) and 29 short-term spaces (15 resident and 14 non-resident).

Additional information and images can be found in our database file for the project, linked below. Want to get involved in the discussion? Check out the associated Forum threads, or leave a comment in the field provided at the bottom of this page.