The Low-Rise Development division of Great Gulf Homes brings Lighthaus to Queen West's Brockton Village. A community of 20 townhomes, Lighthaus is inspired with urban sustainability in mind. The townhomes are designed based on the European “Active House” principles of beauty, comfort, clean, natural light, fresh air, and energy efficiency. 

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

According to Tad Putyra, President and COO of Low-Rise Development for Great Gulf, "The Lighthaus concept is new to Canada...It is designed for a family that likes its space, and likes being close to the action. With Lighthaus Brockton, you don't have to choose between luxury and living responsibly. You can have both." The designers have infused the indoor space with the outdoors in their concept for Lighthaus homes, creating a healthy living environment.

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

Designed in a New Urbanism fashion by STAMP Architecture with families in mind, Lighthaus townhomes are over 20 feet wide — wider and brighter than any townhome on the market in Toronto today — and include a two-car garage and private backyard terrace. The designers have made every effort to infuse air, light and green space to improve the well-being of the occupants. Every unit has the same south exposure. In addition, the site is organized to speak to individuality but also conscious of living side by side. The homes are organized around a central courtyard that ties them all together. Everyone has space, more than you’d find in a typical townhome. 

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

Janet Rosenberg & Associates designed the landscape in a way that is transparent (indoor/outdoor), where outside areas are considered as a second living room. Integrated into the neighbourhood with existing and new trees, Rosenberg has created high standards for outdoor design on a small economical footprint. The walkway behind the homes serves as a social space for the community, where kids can play and neighbours can meet neighbours and foster engagement with the outdoors.

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

This is the first time a developer in Toronto has brought this level of customization to the masses. From architecture to landscape to interior design, the level of specificity for overall concept has not been available on a large scale. Attention to detail is highlighted by the staircase, which displays itself as a feature of the home and is carefully thought through as a design feature rather than just a functional part of the home.

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

Interiors designed by Cecconi Simone serve the way real families live in their homes. The kitchen, as an important gathering place, is outfitted with 12 foot long islands that integrate dining, food preparation, and hosting, and can accommodate 14 people. The many built-in features of the kitchen and living space blend seamlessly with one another, expanding the space of interaction with a variety of surfaces for people to gather around, including prep space, formal dining area and integrated appliances. How the space will be used was taken into consideration with the integrated storage and display spaces, how light is laid out in the rooms, including natural light in the wet/dry areas of the washrooms. The interior flow speaks to design, detail and collaboration.

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus, image by Great Gulf Homes/STAMP Architecture

Light was a primary consideration in the design of Lighthaus. A daylight visualizer was used to produce 3D renderings of light display in each room, allowing the designers to address issues with a nuanced approach by planning natural light to enhance the livability of the space. Most developers charge a premium for natural light. At Lighthause it comes standard. The maximization of natural light is acheived through a combination of sophisticated window and skylight technologies. VELUX Modular Skylight, designed by VELUX and Foster & Partners, adorns a three-storey lightwell that allows natural light to penetrate all levels of the townhome. 

Lighthaus, Toronto Condos, Great Gulf Homes, STAMP Architecture, Cecconi SimoneLighthaus Scale Model, image by Edward Skira

“Bringing the Active House concept to Canada in a Lighthaus community is an important development for the home building sector,” said Mr. Putyra. “It’s a recognition that many families don’t want to have to choose between city and suburban amenities, or between luxurious living and being environmentally responsible."