Today we present the fourth installment of UrbanToronto’s series covering the public art atop the new streetcar shelters on the St. Clair route. If you have not already done so, you may have a look at the earlier installments which present the thought-process behind the project, as well as the accompanying photos of fifteen artworks created by talented artists: Parts 1, 2 and 3.

We begin at Northcliffe station with a piece by Susy Oliveira, entitled Digitalis.  Printed on four panels of glass, the piece features dynamic and vivid flora. Most of Oliveira's work includes boxy, polygon-like representations of everyday objects, from people, to flowers in this case.

St. Clair streetcar public art, Toronto'Digitalis' by Susy Oliveira, at Northcliffe (image by Marcus Mitanis)

We continue west along the route today, showcasing another five art installations.

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Digitalis' by Susy Oliveira, at Northcliffe (image by Marcus Mitanis)

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Origami' by Judith Schwarz, at Dufferin (image by Marcus Mitanis)

Judith Schwarz created Origami, which stands above the shelter at the Dufferin stop. It was created in a very similar style to the artwork at Spadina station, which Schwarz is also responsible for. This one is slightly different though, focusing on floral arrangements and origami techniques, a nice complement to Oliveira's artwork at the Northcliffe stop.

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Here Today, Gone Tomorrow' by Sally McCubbin, at Earlscourt (image by Marcus Mitanis, 2011)

Sally McCubbin is another artist who has created more than one piece for the St. Clair Right-of-Way. The Earlscourt stop is graced with four panels that each have a unique colour, shape and subject. Here Today, Gone Tomorrow, depicts several modes of transportation that are commonly used in different settings and environments.  You will find heavy-duty vehicles printed onto an industrial backdrop, as well as bicycles and streetcars representing the city landscape. It is an appropriate piece given the recent struggle in the city to accommodate bicycles, vehicles, transit and pedestrians.

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Generations' by Panya Clark Espinal, at Lansdowne (image by Marcus Mitanis)

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Generations' by Panya Clark Espinal, at Lansdowne (image by Marcus Mitanis)

Yet another piece by a previously-mentioned artist comes in the form of Generations, by Panya Clark Espinal. Also in the metal screens category like her other work, two faces are pictured on a blue background with a transitioning yellow blossom cascading between. One can view the piece as a commentary on the several age groups who depend on public transit for mobility, and it is fairly eye-catching for the Lansdowne crowd.

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Sidewalk Tango' by Sarah Nind, at Caledonia Park (image by Marcus Mitanis)

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Sidewalk Tango' by Sarah Nind, at Caledonia Park (image by Marcus Mitanis)

St. Clair streetcar public art, TTC, Toronto'Sidewalk Tango' by Sarah Nind, at Caledonia Park (image by Marcus Mitanis)

The last photos today display Sarah Nind’s Sidewalk Tango at Caledonia Park. Each panel is staggered due to the topography of the area, but the subject of the art exposes the wide variety of businesses and images of St. Clair Avenue. From shoe-shopping fashion outlets to fruit stands, St. Clair as well as many Toronto neighbourhoods boast attractive storefronts.

You may visit the St. Clair ROW thread in the Transportation & Infrastructure section of the forum to learn more about the Transit Improvement Project.

The final installment of the series appears tomorrow, so be sure to visit once more. Until then, leave a comment below to have your say about the public art.