Peel Memorial Centre for Integrated Health and Wellness | ?m | 4s | Plenary Health | Diamond Schmitt

Discussion in 'Buildings' started by unimaginative2, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. unimaginative2

    unimaginative2 Senior Member

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    High-tech hospital, low-tech charm

    [​IMG]

    Canada's newest hospital, Brampton Civic, boasts leading-edge equipment for safety and efficiency
    Oct 12, 2007 04:30 AM
    Prithi Yelaja
    Staff Reporter
    Toronto Star

    If you feel like you've stepped into an opera house or an art gallery when you enter the new Brampton Civic Hospital, it will be mission accomplished for John Christie.

    The lead architect of the high-tech hospital, slated to open Oct. 28, says his goal in designing it was to provide an esthetic rather than an antiseptic ambiance.

    The focal point of the 1.2 million-square-foot building is a soaring, 90-metre-long, three-storey high, light-filled atrium lined with windows on one side and oak and maple woods on the other.

    "The atrium is a space that could be a showcase for the hospital. The nice aspect is it can, on occasion, be a community space," says Christie, who exclusively designs health care facilities. With city halls, opera houses and art galleries, only some of the population will be lucky enough to take advantage of that space and visit those buildings, he adds.

    Located off the main entrance, by day the atrium will be the waiting area for one of the hospital's busiest areas – diagnostic imaging – as well as a major corridor anchoring the emergency department at one end.

    The building is also environmentally friendly.

    "To try to use less lighting during the day, we've put into place access to natural lighting wherever possible," says Christie. The natural light from the atrium, for example, penetrates three corridors deep into the building, through the use of various glass technologies and the placement and design of interior windows.

    "It's not only green but it also has a healthy psychological effect. ... Many people will come to the hospital early in the morning. The light in the atrium provides a welcoming gesture ... ."

    The glass used in the atrium has a reflective surface and is interspersed with solid panels that create shading, so as not to unduly burden the air-conditioning system.

    In parts of the building primarily used during the day, air, heat and light systems are on timers that turn down automatically at night. Storm water will be collected to irrigate outside landscaping.

    The floors are made of natural fibres – linseed oil, cork and jute – instead of the more typical vinyl.

    A grass and tree-filled courtyard features a children's playground.



    Paperless care

    Brampton Civic aims to be as paperless as possible. Electronic patient charts will begin when it opens Oct. 28. Old paper records will be scanned so they are instantly available online.

    "It completely eliminates the need for large storage rooms for paper charts and also reduces the resources needed for filing and retrieving those charts. The benefit to patients is their records are available immediately within the hospital or those physician offices or hospitals connected to the system," says Roseann Pacheco, project co-ordinator.

    "The most obvious benefit for clinicians is they don't have to call for a patient chart to come to them. It can be viewed by any number of clinicians at the same time."

    The hospital will also have 500 handheld wireless devices that integrate a range of calls, including bedside calls, codes and alarms, so nurses and doctors can see wave patterns and vital signs from anywhere in the hospital.

    It's all possible because of the powerful computer centre in the hospital's basement and A-class wireless coverage, which will include hot spots for patient use.


    ER tracking

    A "greet nurse" is your first point of contact. She logs you on to the PulseCheck system, the hospital's central database, and then sends you to the triage nurse who will take your vital signs and decide how urgently you need to be seen.

    The department is divided into five zones: fast track for minor cases: a secure pediatric unit; an acute area for trauma patients; a mental health unit and an isolation unit.

    PulseCheck, which electronically tracks patients through the hospital and gives personnel instant access to their records, is a godsend, says manager Marilyn Coons.

    "We see somewhere between 180 and 250 patients a day, and right now in our department it's very difficult to keep track of patients. With our new system we'll always know where everybody is all the time."

    Employing a fingerprint scan to sign on, PulseCheck provides nurses and doctors with details such as a patient's name, gender, age and complaint; staff assigned to care; lab orders; test results; and length of stay – tracked from the time the patient enters emergency.


    Self-serve kiosks

    Brampton Civic is the first hospital in North America to use a self-serve patient registration for outpatients. Ten booths will offer the service in eight languages, including Italian, Hindi, French and Punjabi, via a touch-screen.

    After you choose your language, you swipe your health card, which is linked to the Ministry of Health and immediately verified or rejected. The screen then asks you to confirm what treatment you are scheduled for that day. It prints a map to take you to the treatment area. It asks you to answer a few questions for infection-control purposes.

    Total time: 60 seconds.

    It then directs you to the fast lane, where a clerk checks your photo identification before issuing an ID bracelet. By next year, the bracelet will include a scannable bar code.


    Robot with pills

    A gigantic two-headed robot in the hospital's basement called PillPick – the largest such device in a North American hospital – stores and dispenses medications in single-dose packets with a bar code.

    "It has a 99.9 per cent accuracy in delivery. It was chosen for patient safety as well as efficiency, to ensure the right patient is getting the right pill at the right time, " says consultant Carol Dueck. Pharmacy technicians deliver the drugs to nursing stations and stock medication cabinets, called MedCOWs, with drugs for each patient for a 24-hour period.

    The hospital will have 53 automatic dispensing units – like an ATM for pills – so nurses can access narcotics and other controlled drugs they need to give as symptoms arise.

    Currently nurses manually record drug administration, but by next year they'll be able to scan the bar code on the pill packet to enter that information into the computer and cross-check it with the bar code on the patient's ID bracelet.

    For intravenous drugs the hospital will have 990 SmartPumps, which have electronic drug libraries.
     
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  2. Hydrogen

    Hydrogen post-young

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    Robot with pills?

    Sounds like the dream of every pharmaceutical company.
     
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  3. ShonTron

    ShonTron Moderator

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    This hospital bugs me for many reasons.

    Brampton - Population 450,000. Persons per hospital: 450,000.
    I lived in the southwest part of Brampton, near Shoppers World. The new hospital is almost the exact opposite side of the city.

    Peel Memorial Hospital (where the nasty, overworked ER nurses make Nurse Ratched look like Florence Nightingale) will close for a year before any rehab works start. No promise on what the renovated Peel site will do, but Brampton needs to ERs. Mississauga got Credit Valley Hospital (and its second full-service hospital) finished before it got to 400,000.

    Thanks to Tony Clement and the conservatives, the P-3 delayed the construction for years. McGuinty tweaked the formula, making it somewhat more platable, and getting it finally finished, but is still controversal.

    But the new one is huge and impressive. Too bad it took so long, and that SW Brampton residents are screwed.
     
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  4. p5connex

    p5connex Active Member

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    I am not so keen on the idea of P3 funding- they make it seem so harmless, but in reality it is just another method by which the government doesn't have to pay or as much in this case. Look, I understand that building hospitals is expensive, but as a government they have certain responsibilities and some come with larger price tags that others- rather than, essentially privatising healthcare they should just pay for the buildings themselves. It would make a lot of people feel more at ease.

    p5
     
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  5. lordmandeep

    lordmandeep Banned

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    its a nice hospital really but they should re make the old hospital really.
     
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  6. doady

    doady Senior Member

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    At least Brampton has at a hospital, unlike Vaughan.

    Mississauga actually has three hospitals, if you count the Queensway hospital. But even those are too far apart, imo.
     
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  7. ShonTron

    ShonTron Moderator

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    I don't count Queensway as it doesn't have an emergency room or acute care facilities after Harris let loose on the healthcare system.

    Still, you have to admit that one hospital for 450,000 people is terrible. Vaughan has had to rely on York-Finch, Etobicoke General, York Central Hospital, each of which are not far outside its boundaries, though that's one place that's badly underserved as well. With Sorbara being the most powerful man in cabinet, I thought that would be different, but Vaughan's getting a subway instead.
     
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  8. allabootmatt

    allabootmatt Senior Member

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    Well, that subway will link Vaughan directly to the Univ/College/Dundas hospital cluster...and hey, at rush hour that might be faster than an ambulance to York Central.
     
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  9. Jdot

    Jdot Active Member

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    I guess the NE residents have always been screwed then.
     
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  10. JasonParis

    JasonParis Moderator

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    FYI...the hospital has now been open 2 weeks!
     
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  11. FutureMayor

    FutureMayor Active Member

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    3rd Hospital in Mississauga & Peel Memorial Should Remain Open

    There was a plan around the late 1999's to build a 3rd Hospital in North Mississauga which would have also served southen Brampton.

    It was slated near the intersection of Hurontario and Derry Road I recall. The land was sitting there for the hospital, the Region of Peel had the money in the bank to purchase the land, but the province dropped the ball and the plan never got off the ground.

    I believe the biggest mistake was the simultaneous closing of Peel Memorial with the Opening of Brampton Civic. Peel Memorial's ER department should have remained opened for at least another month to three months to ease the transition into the new hospital. As a result, I'm hearing reports that Brampton Civic is already overcrowded.

    What a shame better funding and planning didn't go into place.

    Louroz
     
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  12. simply Dan

    simply Dan Active Member

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    I could sit in Emergency in a 905 hospital all night, or I could wait 30 mins or less in a downtown Emergency room like at St. Mikes... the drawback is of course that crazy homeless people harass you downtown while you wait!
     
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  13. ShonTron

    ShonTron Moderator

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    But at Brampton's ER, you get the benefit of crazy nasty nurses harrasing you after waiting for 6 hours.

    I once had to help my brother who could barely walk due to severe cramps to the exam area after he was called. The nurse had the gall to bark at me to get lost, as it was patients only. I was afraid that if I told her where she should go (which she obvously needed), the paid-duty cop there would have escorted me out.

    And as a Bramptonian, you were harassed when seeking an alternative facility, like Georgetown, Etobicoke General (which were also Osler), and given the third degree for not going to Peel Memorial.

    And that is one reason why Brampton deserves two full-service hospitals. Spare the "ambulatory care centre" crap, as might happen to the Peel site. As if day dialysis or a glorified doctors' office would be of much use to the 450,000 in Brampton crowding a new emergency department in a hospital that might as well be in another city for those west of Kennedy and south of Queen or west of McLaughlin north of Queen.
     
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  14. ganjavih

    ganjavih Senior Member

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    There ain't no downtown hospital where the usual waiting time in Emerg is 30 min or less... you must have gone on good days. Here in Montreal, people spend days in the ER.
     
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  15. billy corgan

    billy corgan Active Member

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    Unless you say you know the famous Dr.Ganjavih. Then you get right in.
     
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