Laneway Housing | Page 7

Discussion in 'Design and Architectural Style' started by AlvinofDiaspar, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. Avenue

    Avenue Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2017
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    206
    I want laneway housing to happen as soon as possible mainly so that I can stop hearing about it. The discussion around it is extraordinarily large compared how insignificant an impact it will actually have in terms of relieving the housing situation in this city.
     
    #91

  2. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    It is already happening. Your sense of time is relative to your sense of proportion. It was never touted to totally relieve the supply shortage, which, btw, is arguable. There's indication now that the increase in supply is proportionate to rate of population growth. What's gotten skewered is demand based on hysteria not supported by the market fundamentals, but that besides, you miss the essential point. Why rip down perfectly wonderful neighbourhoods to put up gargantuan high-rises when they can be put on open space and brownfields?

    I think we should rip down your house and replace it with a high-rise parking lot. How's that sound?

    Meantime, a sensible approach can be taken to increase density and yet add to the quality of an existing neighbourhood by doing laneway development, and mid-rise infill.
    https://www.planetizen.com/node/67761

    Avenues & Mid-Rise Building Study - Consultant’s Report (pdf)
    A note on the author:
    Robert Freedman, MRAIC, AICP, LSUC, ULI, CanU, is Principal of Freedman Urban Solutions and an Urban Design, Planning and Development Advisor with over 25 years of experience working in a variety of urban and suburban environments in both the public and private sectors.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
    #92
  3. Avenue

    Avenue Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2017
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    206
    I wouldn't care because I'm renting month to month where I am and it may be a matter of months before I'm priced out of there. That is the reality for the majority people in Toronto and that is why the middle-class oriented laneway housing discussion is so tone deaf. "Perfectly wonderful neighbourhoods" mean nothing to majority of the people in Toronto as they don't live in or visit one. They don't have proportional voice or representation - that's a different issue.
     
    #93
  4. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    So you want to pizz on everything else out of spite? Hey, I came to this nation with barely the clothes on my back...don't get me started. Do you think for a moment tearing down other housing to put up high-rise is going to offer you something more affordable? You'd best do some reading. The opposite is happening, like adding fuel to a chimney fire. But I digress, the Globe and Star (as well as many other media) have had stories on that within the last few weeks, and Toronto's problem is far from being a supply-driven one, it's from people like you lighting fires at the drop of a match.
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...tame-torontos-housing-market/article34271252/
    http://www.bnn.ca/real-estate/video/toronto-s-housing-woes-a-demand-problem-not-supply-study~1077675


    Meantime:
    upload_2017-3-17_14-46-3.

    Lots of info here: http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=f3064af89de0c410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2017
    #94
  5. LUVIT!

    LUVIT! Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    161
    A question. Will this bylaw be for only lane ways? What I mean is if one is on a decent sized corner lot could the back of the property, with full access to the side street, possibly be considered?
     
    #95
  6. Avenue

    Avenue Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2017
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    206
    I found the rest of the post not the quite relevant or responding to anything I've said... but out of curiosity what do you even mean here?
     
    #96
  7. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    In answer to your writing this:
    It's no wonder it's incomprehensible to you...

    I wrote:
    In answer to your claiming lack of supply is all that's behind the ridiculous price of renting in Toronto. It isn't. Rampant speculation of buyers, almost half of them not resident in Toronto, or intending to be, is the major force behind the bubble pricing.

    A foreign-buyers tax would help to cool Toronto's housing market ...
    https://www.thestar.com › Opinion › Editorials
    6 days ago - A levy on foreign buyers would help to cool the Toronto housing market as the politicians work on longer-term solutions.

    Ontario reconsidering a foreign buyers' tax to cool housing market ...
    www.theglobeandmail.com › Real Estate › Toronto
    Mar 9, 2017 - Brad Henderson, CEO of Sotheby's International Realty Canada, said foreign buyers are a tiny proportion of the Toronto market and any move ...

    A foreign-buyers housing tax in Toronto? Bring it on - and fast - The ...
    www.theglobeandmail.com › Globe Investor › Personal Finance › Household Finances
    Mar 10, 2017 - The Toronto market must be tamed because it's turning into a laboratory experiment on how obsessional thinking about a particular kind of ...
    You visited this page on 16/03/17.

    Biggest factor in Ontario's red-hot housing market is demand: finance ...
    globalnews.ca/.../ontario-foreign-buyer-tax-would-not-address-soaring-prices-toronto...
    Mar 10, 2017 - Ontario's finance minister said Friday that while he is considering a tax on foreign home buyers for Toronto and beyond, it's not the biggest ...
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017
    #97
  8. innsertnamehere

    innsertnamehere Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    8,514
    Likes Received:
    1,486
    Location:
    Hipsterville
    They have done this a lot in Cornell in Markham. All the new houses are laneway access, and they gave buyers the option to construct a rental unit on top of the rear garage. Lots of them scattered around the subdivision, and creates a healthy mix of affordable rental housing in the neighbourhood. Rent is typically $1000-$1200 judging by craigslist

    laneway housing.
     
    #98
    Ottawan and steveintoronto like this.
  9. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    Excellent! Thanks for the rental price too. I'm a bit late catching it, but NOW mag had an extensive piece on Laneway Housing two days ago:
    https://nowtoronto.com/lifestyle/real-estate/Toronto-laneway-housing-future/
    I'm literally in the midst of an email debate with an architect/lecturer friend and one of his assistant architects at this moment, albeit I'm sure he's now hit the sack, and to save time transcribing, I'm just going to paste this in after slight editing:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/toronto-has-more-than-99000-unoccupied-homes-2017-2

    I have to make clear, he supports the concept of laneway housing, but feels the premise of necessity due to a "housing crisis" is baseless. Our discussion continues tomorrow...
     
    #99
  10. wopchop

    wopchop Building Toronto

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    1,378
    Likes Received:
    204
    Location:
    Oakville
    Doesn't mean that it is not a 'housing crisis'. It just means that it is not an issue of supply.

    If there are 100,000 uninhabited dwellings in Toronto, and they are uninhabited either because their rents are too high for market, or because speculators are hanging onto properties, or some combination of both, then I would certainly call that a crisis.
     
  11. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    Absolutely agreed. We're up against semantics and definition of "supply"...which in actual units being built, matches the rate of increase in population.

    A better term might be *available supply*...and by realizing why that availability is stymied would go a long way to addressing the 'bubble' in prices, which of course is a related issue.
    Avenue's lament is spiteful as well as badly aimed, and I answered quite curtly to him/her prior. This is an issue of *quality* of community expansion, not quantity.

    I've got to get more details on Insert Name's Markham example, because if Markham can do it, so can Toronto. The "100,000" un-inhabitated units can be addressed better in the "bubble" string, and that's something many cities have done. It looks like Toronto is lagging badly on that.
     
  12. narduch

    narduch Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2014
    Messages:
    363
    Likes Received:
    111
    I don't understand how people get away with leaving homes unnocupied.

    When my wife's grandmother moved into a nursing home the insurance company told us to either put the house on sale or rent it. They wouldn't insure an empty house.
     
  13. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    I was shocked at the "100,000" figure for uninhabited units for Toronto. I knew it was substantial, had no idea it was *multiples more than Vancouver!*

    I'm going to dig into the federal government stat later, but this topic is becoming a hot one, been a number of opening page articles on it in the Globe and Star just within the last few days. The following is interesting:

    https://www.biv.com/article/2016/7/testing-murky-legal-waters-urban-empty-homes-tax/
     
  14. steveintoronto

    steveintoronto Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2016
    Messages:
    3,537
    Likes Received:
    952
    This brings up the related point of insuring laneway housing:
    http://www.ctvnews.ca/business/grow...ses-raises-concerns-about-insurance-1.2569389

    As to uninhabited residential property and insurance:

    [Vacant and Unoccupied Properties: What Does Your Insurance Cover?]
    http://www.brokerlink.ca/blog/vacant_and_unoccupied_properties/
     
  15. innsertnamehere

    innsertnamehere Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    8,514
    Likes Received:
    1,486
    Location:
    Hipsterville
    They are uninhabited by Census Canada standards, which means nobody responded to the census from that unit. I Can tell you that the vast majority of students would not respond to the census, as most of them would likely still fill it out in their childhood home. Illegal immigrants would likely also not fill theirs out, people who own second homes in Toronto would not fill it out, etc. An unoccupied dwelling does not automatically mean it is sitting empty due to speculation or oversupply.

    If you looked at the occupied dwelling rate in Muskoka, its only 55%. Cottages mean that most dwellings are "unoccupied". Toronto is 94% occupied. London is 94%. Waterloo is 95%. Kingston is 88%. Are you telling me that there is large amounts of speculation in those markets too?
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017

Share This Page